Regional Boards > Canada

British Columbia's Highways

<< < (13/17) > >>

Kniwt:
The CBC has a long report, with lots of photos and video, showing how the Coquihalla Highway (BC 5) was reopened after November's storm.
https://www.cbc.ca/newsinteractives/features/coquihalla-repaired-35-days


--- Quote ---B.C.’s transportation minister Rob Fleming described the Dec. 20, 2021, reopening of the highway to commercial traffic and buses as “one of the most remarkable engineering feats in recent memory in the province of British Columbia.”

... The cost of the temporary repairs required to reopen the Coquihalla, also known as Highway 5, was between about $45 million and $55 million, according to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure.

It took more than 300 workers and 200 pieces of equipment 35 days to reopen the highway.

--- End quote ---

Alps:

--- Quote from: Kniwt on February 05, 2022, 07:24:46 PM ---The CBC has a long report, with lots of photos and video, showing how the Coquihalla Highway (BC 5) was reopened after November's storm.
https://www.cbc.ca/newsinteractives/features/coquihalla-repaired-35-days


--- Quote ---B.C.’s transportation minister Rob Fleming described the Dec. 20, 2021, reopening of the highway to commercial traffic and buses as “one of the most remarkable engineering feats in recent memory in the province of British Columbia.”

... The cost of the temporary repairs required to reopen the Coquihalla, also known as Highway 5, was between about $45 million and $55 million, according to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure.

It took more than 300 workers and 200 pieces of equipment 35 days to reopen the highway.

--- End quote ---



--- End quote ---
https://goo.gl/maps/23r79yFU8UT8e6wYA

Bruce:
North end of the Granville Bridge will look a bit different by next year: the northern loops will be demolished to make way for development.

City of Vancouver is seeking a contractor to demolish the north loops of the Granville Bridge in downtown. Work could begin later in 2022.

It'll be replaced with a new H-shaped street grid, and 6 towers with ~1 million sq ft of housing. #vanpoli #vanrehttps://t.co/dy0OWP1Sbi pic.twitter.com/pp3SNsau1o— Kenneth Chan (@iamkennethchan) March 25, 2022
--- End quote ---

jakeroot:

--- Quote from: Bruce on March 25, 2022, 06:36:12 PM ---North end of the Granville Bridge will look a bit different by next year: the northern loops will be demolished to make way for development.

[clipped]

--- End quote ---

Definitely a bit overdue. I don't think it's imperative to improve Drake St for traffic coming off the bridge, but I would imagine it may be worth installing an advanced left turn from Drake onto the bridge, as I think that will be the main access route for traffic from Pacific; going around via Hornby and Drake may clog up quick with the change to protected right turn phasing due to improvements to the cycle path along Hornby.

Edit: never mind, looks like Drake is being converted to one-way. Didn't know that. Perhaps they can add the advanced left turn at Davie and Granville instead. Traffic travelling beyond Davie likely isn't trying to access the Granville Bridge, so no reason to make large-scale changes besides that.

andrepoiy:
I just visited the Vancouver Area + Southern Vancouver Island for a week.

Man, as someone from Ontario, I find that BC roads are so... strange.

For routing:

Going up and down Highway 99 to Whistler, why isn't this at least RIRO? It seems like this corridor is busy enough/unsafe enough to at least warrant that. Same for Highway 1 on Vancouver Island between Victoria and Nanaimo, and Highway 17 between the ferry and Victoria.

Lions Gate Bridge - why is there no direct connection to Hwy 1? On the other end, it becomes West Georgia Street, which was so slow. Perhaps it might be better if this end was routed onto a one-way pair?? The Howe/Seymour combination that Highway 99 later becomes, I found to be a lot quicker in the same distance.

Highway 99 in Richmond - why isn't there an exit at Blundell Road?

Following Highway 99 in Vancouver during rush hour on Granville Street was so slow. Jesus. And the part of 99 that goes on West 70th Street to get to the bridge took me 20 minutes. For a distance of 700m. Insane.

For road design:

The turn arrows to me look weird, like they were drawn by kids...
Some signs are also strange (such as a "MERGE" sign as opposed to just, using the pictoral sign of a lane ending)
And don't get me started on the traffic signals!! Why do the signals on the side look rather neglected (with no backplates), and why are they 8-8-8-12???? Ahhhhhh


Some things I did find interesting though:

The "Prepare to Stop" signs/lights that turn on before a light turns yellow, people seem to start braking when they go on, and they seem to act as an extension of a yellow light. I found that to be quite interesting, and maybe beneficial for Ontario to consider those as well, as it clearly could reduce rear-end crashes.

The extensive use of pedestrian crossovers (flashing green lights). I guess it's good for the thru traffic to flow more efficiently, as in Ontario those same intersections would just be a regular light config, and therefore a lot of time wasted to stop thru traffic for 1 car.

Highway 4 to Tofino had "slow vehicle pullouts" which seems to be a good idea for areas where the ROW would be too narrow to get passing lanes. Not to mention the signs directing slow vehicles to pull out were black-on-white regulatory signs, and not suggestions. Ontario should take note.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version