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Author Topic: Corridor H  (Read 478353 times)

cpzilliacus

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1300 on: August 02, 2021, 03:18:11 PM »

On my family's vacation to DC in the early 1980s, we used the northern route. I don't think the four-lane was finished past Cumberland, but it still wasn't a bad route even then.

You are correct.  From Cumberland west, the road looked much like it does today.

But Hancock to east of Sideling Hill had some pretty rough spots, especially the switchback at the top of Sideling Hill and between Rocky Gap and Flintstone.  There was also an isolated and short freeway segment on what is now I-68 that included the interchange at Exit 64 (Orleans Road). 
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sparker

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1301 on: August 02, 2021, 08:54:26 PM »

On my family's vacation to DC in the early 1980s, we used the northern route. I don't think the four-lane was finished past Cumberland, but it still wasn't a bad route even then.

You are correct.  From Cumberland west, the road looked much like it does today.

But Hancock to east of Sideling Hill had some pretty rough spots, especially the switchback at the top of Sideling Hill and between Rocky Gap and Flintstone.  There was also an isolated and short freeway segment on what is now I-68 that included the interchange at Exit 64 (Orleans Road). 

I can attest to that as well; my first time using that corridor (WB) was in mid-1989 when the western portion was signed as US 48.  Saw the Sideling construction in progress up the hillside; that portion reminded me of the effort on I-80 in the Sierras circa 1959-60, with long gashes carved out of hillsides above the original highway.  Less impressed with the narrow Cumberland "snake" freeway, but the section into WV, including the long/high bridge over the Youghiogheny River made up for that.  Did the trip in reverse about two and a half years later after it was completed and signed as I-68; got to see Sideling "freshly cut" as it was -- a geologist's playground!   
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cpzilliacus

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1302 on: August 03, 2021, 12:59:57 AM »

I can attest to that as well; my first time using that corridor (WB) was in mid-1989 when the western portion was signed as US 48.  Saw the Sideling construction in progress up the hillside; that portion reminded me of the effort on I-80 in the Sierras circa 1959-60, with long gashes carved out of hillsides above the original highway.  Less impressed with the narrow Cumberland "snake" freeway, but the section into WV, including the long/high bridge over the Youghiogheny River made up for that.  Did the trip in reverse about two and a half years later after it was completed and signed as I-68; got to see Sideling "freshly cut" as it was -- a geologist's playground!

The Cumberland Thruway section of I-68 is pre-Interstate engineering and design.  It was originally the U.S. 40 bypass through the downtown area of Cumberland (not sure if it was signed as bypass U.S. 40) and opened to traffic about 1962. When U.S. 48 and then I-68 came along, it was incorporated into those freeways with little or no modification.
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SkyPesos

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1303 on: August 03, 2021, 01:04:55 AM »

Is US 48 the most used 2dus number on separate routings at this point? First in San Jose, then on I-68/Corridor E, and now on Corridor H.
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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1304 on: August 03, 2021, 03:43:33 AM »

I can attest to that as well; my first time using that corridor (WB) was in mid-1989 when the western portion was signed as US 48.  Saw the Sideling construction in progress up the hillside; that portion reminded me of the effort on I-80 in the Sierras circa 1959-60, with long gashes carved out of hillsides above the original highway.  Less impressed with the narrow Cumberland "snake" freeway, but the section into WV, including the long/high bridge over the Youghiogheny River made up for that.  Did the trip in reverse about two and a half years later after it was completed and signed as I-68; got to see Sideling "freshly cut" as it was -- a geologist's playground!

The Cumberland Thruway section of I-68 is pre-Interstate engineering and design.  It was originally the U.S. 40 bypass through the downtown area of Cumberland (not sure if it was signed as bypass U.S. 40) and opened to traffic about 1962. When U.S. 48 and then I-68 came along, it was incorporated into those freeways with little or no modification.

And yet FHWA signed off on its Interstate status (obviously with waivers) circa 1991.  Since it appears they've tightened up their standards as of late, I wonder if the Cumberland Thruway would be approved today. 
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hbelkins

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1305 on: August 03, 2021, 10:18:53 AM »

I can attest to that as well; my first time using that corridor (WB) was in mid-1989 when the western portion was signed as US 48.  Saw the Sideling construction in progress up the hillside; that portion reminded me of the effort on I-80 in the Sierras circa 1959-60, with long gashes carved out of hillsides above the original highway.  Less impressed with the narrow Cumberland "snake" freeway, but the section into WV, including the long/high bridge over the Youghiogheny River made up for that.  Did the trip in reverse about two and a half years later after it was completed and signed as I-68; got to see Sideling "freshly cut" as it was -- a geologist's playground!

The Cumberland Thruway section of I-68 is pre-Interstate engineering and design.  It was originally the U.S. 40 bypass through the downtown area of Cumberland (not sure if it was signed as bypass U.S. 40) and opened to traffic about 1962. When U.S. 48 and then I-68 came along, it was incorporated into those freeways with little or no modification.

And yet FHWA signed off on its Interstate status (obviously with waivers) circa 1991.  Since it appears they've tightened up their standards as of late, I wonder if the Cumberland Thruway would be approved today.

Seems like it would be hard not to approve it, given that there are modern interstates touching either side of a very short piece of elevated freeway. I suppose the alternative would be to post "To I-68" signs along it if it wasn't considered to be an actual part of the interstate. It's not like NY 17 where you have sections with at-grade intersections.
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Mapmikey

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1306 on: August 03, 2021, 10:23:22 AM »

Is US 48 the most used 2dus number on separate routings at this point? First in San Jose, then on I-68/Corridor E, and now on Corridor H.

Yes...

Very few have even been used twice:
US 46, US 96

Note that the first US 46 and first US 48 were never posted...
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Rothman

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1307 on: August 03, 2021, 10:46:00 AM »



I can attest to that as well; my first time using that corridor (WB) was in mid-1989 when the western portion was signed as US 48.  Saw the Sideling construction in progress up the hillside; that portion reminded me of the effort on I-80 in the Sierras circa 1959-60, with long gashes carved out of hillsides above the original highway.  Less impressed with the narrow Cumberland "snake" freeway, but the section into WV, including the long/high bridge over the Youghiogheny River made up for that.  Did the trip in reverse about two and a half years later after it was completed and signed as I-68; got to see Sideling "freshly cut" as it was -- a geologist's playground!

The Cumberland Thruway section of I-68 is pre-Interstate engineering and design.  It was originally the U.S. 40 bypass through the downtown area of Cumberland (not sure if it was signed as bypass U.S. 40) and opened to traffic about 1962. When U.S. 48 and then I-68 came along, it was incorporated into those freeways with little or no modification.

And yet FHWA signed off on its Interstate status (obviously with waivers) circa 1991.  Since it appears they've tightened up their standards as of late, I wonder if the Cumberland Thruway would be approved today.

Seems like it would be hard not to approve it, given that there are modern interstates touching either side of a very short piece of elevated freeway. I suppose the alternative would be to post "To I-68" signs along it if it wasn't considered to be an actual part of the interstate. It's not like NY 17 where you have sections with at-grade intersections.

Depends on the FHWA Division Office.  I suspect if NC's was in NY, I-86 would be further along.
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SkyPesos

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1308 on: August 03, 2021, 10:48:06 AM »

I can attest to that as well; my first time using that corridor (WB) was in mid-1989 when the western portion was signed as US 48.  Saw the Sideling construction in progress up the hillside; that portion reminded me of the effort on I-80 in the Sierras circa 1959-60, with long gashes carved out of hillsides above the original highway.  Less impressed with the narrow Cumberland "snake" freeway, but the section into WV, including the long/high bridge over the Youghiogheny River made up for that.  Did the trip in reverse about two and a half years later after it was completed and signed as I-68; got to see Sideling "freshly cut" as it was -- a geologist's playground!

The Cumberland Thruway section of I-68 is pre-Interstate engineering and design.  It was originally the U.S. 40 bypass through the downtown area of Cumberland (not sure if it was signed as bypass U.S. 40) and opened to traffic about 1962. When U.S. 48 and then I-68 came along, it was incorporated into those freeways with little or no modification.

And yet FHWA signed off on its Interstate status (obviously with waivers) circa 1991.  Since it appears they've tightened up their standards as of late, I wonder if the Cumberland Thruway would be approved today.

Seems like it would be hard not to approve it, given that there are modern interstates touching either side of a very short piece of elevated freeway. I suppose the alternative would be to post "To I-68" signs along it if it wasn't considered to be an actual part of the interstate. It's not like NY 17 where you have sections with at-grade intersections.
Considering MD have no shortage of “To I-68” signs on WB I-70 (and even one on I-270 I think) right now, they’re probably fine with that to encourage drivers to shunpike.
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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1309 on: August 04, 2021, 12:40:41 AM »

Is US 48 the most used 2dus number on separate routings at this point? First in San Jose, then on I-68/Corridor E, and now on Corridor H.

Yes...

Very few have even been used twice:
US 46, US 96

Note that the first US 46 and first US 48 were never posted...
There are a couple of 3-digit routes that have also moved around. US 117 is one, US 121 now (well, soon) is another.

mvak36

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1310 on: August 04, 2021, 10:05:38 AM »

https://www.wvnews.com/news/wvnews/west-virginia-sen-manchin-infrastructure-package-includes-200m-for-corridor-h/article_588f3d5a-f46c-11eb-9d0b-4bb5aa169e4f.html

Quote
WASHINGTON (WV News) — West Virginia could receive nearly $200 million to support the completion of Corridor H as part of the infrastructure package currently before Congress, according to Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va.

On Tuesday, Manchin, along with Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, announced the inclusion of their bipartisan, bicameral Finish the Appalachian Development Highway System (ADHS) Act in the $1 trillion infrastructure bill.

...

Currently, 101 miles of Corridor H are open to traffic in West Virginia, with 31 miles left to open, including the section from Kerens to Parsons. To date, an estimated $1.93 billion has been spent on Corridor H. However, an estimated $1.10 billion worth of work remains.

According to information from the West Virginia Encyclopedia, development of West Virginia’s Appalachian Corridor highways began in 1965 when Sen. Jennings Randolph, D-W.Va., helped to create the Appalachian Regional Commission.

The Appalachian Development Highway System was created under the Appalachian Regional Commission to attract industry and diversify the economic base by building good roads throughout the previously isolated region.

Originally including 23 individual corridors designated alphabetically from A to W, the 3,285-mile system was designed to link the interstate highways of the 13 Appalachian states.

Of West Virginia’s six routes, designated D, E, G, H, L and Q, Corridor H is the only corridor highway that remains incomplete.
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sparker

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1311 on: August 04, 2021, 12:53:44 PM »

https://www.wvnews.com/news/wvnews/west-virginia-sen-manchin-infrastructure-package-includes-200m-for-corridor-h/article_588f3d5a-f46c-11eb-9d0b-4bb5aa169e4f.html

Quote
WASHINGTON (WV News) — West Virginia could receive nearly $200 million to support the completion of Corridor H as part of the infrastructure package currently before Congress, according to Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va.

On Tuesday, Manchin, along with Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, announced the inclusion of their bipartisan, bicameral Finish the Appalachian Development Highway System (ADHS) Act in the $1 trillion infrastructure bill.

...

Currently, 101 miles of Corridor H are open to traffic in West Virginia, with 31 miles left to open, including the section from Kerens to Parsons. To date, an estimated $1.93 billion has been spent on Corridor H. However, an estimated $1.10 billion worth of work remains.

According to information from the West Virginia Encyclopedia, development of West Virginia’s Appalachian Corridor highways began in 1965 when Sen. Jennings Randolph, D-W.Va., helped to create the Appalachian Regional Commission.

The Appalachian Development Highway System was created under the Appalachian Regional Commission to attract industry and diversify the economic base by building good roads throughout the previously isolated region.

Originally including 23 individual corridors designated alphabetically from A to W, the 3,285-mile system was designed to link the interstate highways of the 13 Appalachian states.

Of West Virginia’s six routes, designated D, E, G, H, L and Q, Corridor H is the only corridor highway that remains incomplete.

With Manchin in the "catbird" position in the Senate, this was a no-brainer on his part.  Wouldn't be at all surprised to see money for Coalfields earmarked as well before the final bill's approval. 
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hbelkins

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1312 on: August 04, 2021, 01:05:04 PM »

Wonder if the Portman/Manchin bill includes any work for getting US 119 (Corridor F) finished in Letcher County? The state had talked about making improvements to the section already finished (parts of it four lanes, the rest 2+1) between Whitesburg and Jenkins, but isn't moving on finishing the rest of the "valley floor" portion or the Pine Mountain crossing.

Since McConnell has acquiesced to supporting parts of the infrastructure bill, seems like this is something he could get behind.
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seicer

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1313 on: August 04, 2021, 01:45:44 PM »

Wonder if the Portman/Manchin bill includes any work for getting US 119 (Corridor F) finished in Letcher County? The state had talked about making improvements to the section already finished (parts of it four lanes, the rest 2+1) between Whitesburg and Jenkins, but isn't moving on finishing the rest of the "valley floor" portion or the Pine Mountain crossing.

Since McConnell has acquiesced to supporting parts of the infrastructure bill, seems like this is something he could get behind.

Potentially: https://www.kentucky.com/news/politics-government/article253253363.html#storylink=topdigest_latest

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1314 on: August 07, 2021, 10:20:27 AM »

I haven’t paid attention to Corridor H that much, but looking at a map, it sort of looks like an eastward continuation of the OH 32 Corridor D to DC. This seems like a nice alternative routing from Cincinnati to DC to I-70, and I might try it out next time going to DC.

But U.S. 50 east of I-79 (not part of Corridor D) has a lot of sharp curves and steep grades.


Note that Google shows an alternative routing using CR 25 from US 48-219 to make a straight line from Davis to WV 38 them over via WV 57 that is a couple minutes faster than using WV 42 to US 50.  WV 38/57 is nowhere near as bad as US 50 for curves.

Weather permitting I am going to try the CR 25 routing next weekend to see how it is.

I did get out that way yesterday...

CR 25 has good pavement, but the road is mostly 1.5 lanes wide, mostly unstriped, steep and twisty.  Larger passenger vehicles would find this uncomfortable as a through route and I'm pretty sure I won't use it again either.

Super impressed with the bridge being built southwest of Parsons which as CP mentioned has the piers essentially done but no horizontal pieces.
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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1315 on: August 28, 2021, 02:31:15 AM »

On my family's vacation to DC in the early 1980s, we used the northern route. I don't think the four-lane was finished past Cumberland, but it still wasn't a bad route even then.

You are correct.  From Cumberland west, the road looked much like it does today.

But Hancock to east of Sideling Hill had some pretty rough spots, especially the switchback at the top of Sideling Hill and between Rocky Gap and Flintstone.  There was also an isolated and short freeway segment on what is now I-68 that included the interchange at Exit 64 (Orleans Road).

So I have this map https://raisedrelief.com/products/cumberland-usgs-regional-3d-map, what portions of it on the I-68 and US 48 corridors are accurate?
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Bitmapped

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1316 on: November 02, 2021, 10:02:03 PM »

The original signage installed on the US 219 portion of Corridor H between Elkins and Kerens had an empty steel post at each set of reassurance markers to accommodate signs for another route. I assumed this was done in preparation for US 48 eventually to be extended over the highway.

I found some plans for this section of road from the 1990s at https://www.bidx.com/wv/attachment?filekey=6c8e3451-c479-11eb-a0d8-aa18e2af2746/files/a3f44ec5-c47a-11eb-a622-b2cce3f6d0f8.pdf&drive=1. It appears the plan was originally to move WV 55 onto this route, having Elkins-Kerens signed as US 33 and WV 55. It appears the second set of posts were intended for WV 55 markers.
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seicer

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1317 on: November 03, 2021, 11:11:12 AM »

Where would US 33 have connected to? It would have required a reroute in VA.

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1318 on: November 03, 2021, 12:01:59 PM »

Where would US 33 have connected to? It would have required a reroute in VA.

I think US 33 was supposed to have gone to around Harrisonburg, but keep in mind Elkins-Kerens was designed and built after the US 33 alignment east of Elkins had already been cancelled.
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hbelkins

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1319 on: November 03, 2021, 01:01:02 PM »

Where would US 33 have connected to? It would have required a reroute in VA.

I think US 33 was supposed to have gone to around Harrisonburg, but keep in mind Elkins-Kerens was designed and built after the US 33 alignment east of Elkins had already been cancelled.

Yes, and I've seen maps (WVDOT official) with a proposed routing of US 33 that indicated as such.
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seicer

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1320 on: November 04, 2021, 02:01:38 PM »

Interesting.

Also from a recent trip up that way, US 48 is being asphalted west of Elkins for a number of miles. That segment is older than I had thought (1994) and the concrete joints were all deteriorating. WVDOH has invested a lot to replace practically every joint. I'm surprised they just didn't diamond grind it down afterward.

And it's good to see the state investing in recessed reflective markers. Kentucky recessed its markers decades ago and only recently began doing it state-wide. I noticed Virginia doing the same on newly paved routes.

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1321 on: November 04, 2021, 06:08:22 PM »

Interesting.

Also from a recent trip up that way, US 48 is being asphalted west of Elkins for a number of miles. That segment is older than I had thought (1994) and the concrete joints were all deteriorating. WVDOH has invested a lot to replace practically every joint. I'm surprised they just didn't diamond grind it down afterward.

And it's good to see the state investing in recessed reflective markers. Kentucky recessed its markers decades ago and only recently began doing it state-wide. I noticed Virginia doing the same on newly paved routes.
I find it interesting that the joints didn't even last 30 years. I can't swear to it, but the joints of the same age along I-287 here appear to still be original and those see much heavier traffic and similar freeze/thaw.

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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1322 on: November 05, 2021, 10:07:21 AM »

Also from a recent trip up that way, US 48 is being asphalted west of Elkins for a number of miles. That segment is older than I had thought (1994) and the concrete joints were all deteriorating. WVDOH has invested a lot to replace practically every joint. I'm surprised they just didn't diamond grind it down afterward.

The Randolph County section had concrete rehab and diamond grinding a couple years ago. There were still issues with panels settling. I'm not sure if the joints lacked dowels or what.

And it's good to see the state investing in recessed reflective markers. Kentucky recessed its markers decades ago and only recently began doing it state-wide. I noticed Virginia doing the same on newly paved routes.

Not really in any sort of widespread manner. They get installed on Interstates, Corridors, and multilane highways but aren't really maintained. There's been some limited testing with installing them on a couple stretches of 2-lane, like US 219 around the Randolph/Tucker line.
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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1323 on: November 05, 2021, 10:10:03 AM »

The Elkins-Kerens portion of Corridor H is going to be closed for about a year due to reconstruction of the ~20-year old bridges over Pearcy Run and Harpertown Road (Randolph CR 1). The bridges have failing abutments. Traffic will be detoured using Old US 219 during the closure.

https://www.wdtv.com/2021/11/01/corridor-h-close-bridge-reconstruction/
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Re: Corridor H
« Reply #1324 on: November 05, 2021, 11:19:31 AM »

Yikes. For reference, it's at https://goo.gl/maps/hMgyxMhc842Uzutp6

 


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