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Cities Along A Freeway Where Scenery Changes

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roadman65:
I-5 in Northern California has a drastic change passing through Red Bluff.  North of that particular city is a mix of trees and rolling hills, but south of it, you experience flat agricultural plains.

Name other cities of small size that the land around an interstate or other major freeway designation changes and is very noticeable when driving through it.

Dirt Roads:
It's not considered a single freeway, but taking the straight north-south route across Charleston, West Virginia using I-64 eastbound across the Fort Hill Bridge and then staying straight onto I-77 northbound shows how narrow the city is along the Kanawha River.  After crossing that river, you first run parallel to the Elk River with downtown on the east side and a semi-commercial zone on the West Side.  After the I-64/I-77 interchange, you enter the Elk River trench with an older residential section along the Interstate and a narrow industrial corridor on the east side.  But once you get to the I-77/I-79 interchange, its almost completely forested (with a glimpse of the Yeager Airport atop the ridge to the east.

It's about 3 miles from Corridor G -to- I-79.

Should I mention that going the other way, I-64 runs alongside the huge former Union Carbide chemical complex (now Dow) in South Charleston.  A drastic change in scenery, but probably not what the OP was looking for.

Hobart:
I'm gonna go for the low hanging fruit here!

Literally any road that runs east and west through Denver is a great example of this. Heading east into Denver, you drive through eastern Colorado, which is still relatively flat like Kansas or Nebraska, but once you start going west out of Denver, you hit the Rockies almost immediately.

My dad lived in Aurora for a few months back in the 80's, and he said it was a lot like that. Aurora is quite flat, but you can see the mountains a relatively short distance away.

TheHighwayMan394:
I-90 in Chamberlain, SD, where you cross the Missouri River. West side (known as "West River") is more arid ranch land typical of Plains scenery, while "East River" is the more traditional, greener rolling farmland of the Midwest.

JayhawkCO:

--- Quote from: Hobart on November 21, 2022, 01:55:41 PM ---I'm gonna go for the low hanging fruit here!

Literally any road that runs east and west through Denver is a great example of this. Heading east into Denver, you drive through eastern Colorado, which is still relatively flat like Kansas or Nebraska, but once you start going west out of Denver, you hit the Rockies almost immediately.

My dad lived in Aurora for a few months back in the 80's, and he said it was a lot like that. Aurora is quite flat, but you can see the mountains a relatively short distance away.

--- End quote ---

More specifically in the mountains though, I'll pick Vail. East of Vail, it's the typical alpine Colorado that people picture. Once west, immediately more "Utah style" red rock is visible.

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