Lane End Signs on Expressways

Started by Mergingtraffic, March 16, 2010, 08:16:12 PM

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Mergingtraffic

What bugs me is that on signs that say "Lane Ends Ahead," "Lane Ends 1500 Feet" that don't have down arrows pointing to that lane.  Sometimes the signs are exactly overhead the proper lane.

Here is an example...wouldn't it be clearer to have a down pointing arrow?


Doesn't it look better with the drop arrow as viewed in the link?
http://www.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=old+lyme,+ct&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=30.544155,56.162109&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Old+Lyme,+New+London,+Connecticut&ll=41.372123,-72.199101&spn=0,359.978113&z=16&layer=c&cbll=41.372194,-72.199007&panoid=w3JFzbFQuTE37BvjTFZs2g&cbp=12,225,,0,-14.68


Even though the following is not a "Lane Ends Sign" the "Prohibited in This Lane" sign is clearer with the down arrow.
I only take pics of good looking signs. Long live non-reflective button copy!
MergingTraffic https://www.flickr.com/photos/98731835@N05/


TheArguer

Where I live, they say "Right Lane Ends. Merge Left". I thought all signs specified which lane is ending. Guess not.
Proud to be AARoad's youngest member.

agentsteel53

I am borderline dyslexic, so I always mix up "lane ends, merge RIGHT" with "RIGHT lane ends, merge"... a potentially disastrous mistake, because while both have the same keyword, they mean precisely opposite things.

I really like the graphical solution because it leaves me not having to use my higher, slower consciousness to reason through which lane ends and which lane continues to exist.

that said, I'm the guy who thinks the lane markings mean "BUS TO YIELD", not "YIELD TO BUS" and have cut off many a bus in my time.
live from sunny San Diego.

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jake@aaroads.com

Bryant5493

The arrow pointing down to the lane that will be ending is a good thing to do. What I hate about Georgia Interstates, freeways, etc. is that they don't have the dashed lines all the way to the end of the pavement or an arrow pointing left or right, when a lane is ending. Some lanes do, but I'd like Georgia to be more like Alabama. Alabama at least has the dashed line all of the way to the end of the lane that has to merge. Also, Georgia doesn't always have signage when a lane ends, and, sometimes, the signage is erroneous.


Be well,

Bryant
Check out my YouTube page (http://youtube.com/Bryant5493). I have numerous road videos of Metro Atlanta and other areas in the Southeast.

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shoptb1

I personally like how Maryland signs the ending of a lane best.  In addition to down arrows, they also always provide a side-mounted sign on rural freeways that indicates the direction of the lane-end.  Not the same situation as shown below, but a nice graphic as opposed to just 'Lane Ends' in text.




Bryant5493

^^

Funky little sign that is. I like it.


Be well,

Bryant
Check out my YouTube page (http://youtube.com/Bryant5493). I have numerous road videos of Metro Atlanta and other areas in the Southeast.

I just signed up on photobucket -- here's my page (http://s594.photobucket.com/albums/tt24/Bryant5493).

froggie

There's a few scattered around Northern Virginia as well.

Ian

Quote from: shoptb1 on March 16, 2010, 09:07:51 PM
I personally like how Maryland signs the ending of a lane best.  In addition to down arrows, they also always provide a side-mounted sign on rural freeways that indicates the direction of the lane-end.  Not the same situation as shown below, but a nice graphic as opposed to just 'Lane Ends' in text.





I really do like that design.

In Rhode Island, they just install giant yellow diamond signs over the lane ending like so...



UMaine graduate, former PennDOT employee, new SoCal resident.
Youtube l Flickr

shoptb1

Here's a picture of this sign (right-land ends) on I-68 West of Cumberland, MD.




thenetwork

Back in the 70's, Michigan had a "cousin" sign to Maryland's LANE ENDS sign that was called FORM x LANE(s).  It looked something like this:


FORM
<-2--
LANES

That one, IMHO, fit the bill perfectly.  It told you which way to merge and how many lane(s) will be remaining after the merge.

(Anybody got a pic of those vintage signs?)

joseph1723

Ontario has two different styles of lane ends signs, the first ones were text signs that are no longer installed now but to bilingual issues. Both style had a ground mounted and a overhead version which had a down arrow to point to the lane that in ending.

Old style overhead version:


Old style ground mounted version:

The distance was placed on a seperate tab sign underneath the main sign. There was also a similar sign that had the text "RAMP ENDS HERE" instead to signify the ramp ending. 


Current overhead version:


The current ground mounted version of the lane ends sign is the standard lane ends symbol sign in the MUTCD.

roadfro

Quote from: shoptb1 on March 16, 2010, 09:07:51 PM
I personally like how Maryland signs the ending of a lane best.  In addition to down arrows, they also always provide a side-mounted sign on rural freeways that indicates the direction of the lane-end.  Not the same situation as shown below, but a nice graphic as opposed to just 'Lane Ends' in text.


I've never been a fan of this sign. I think it has something to do with the arrows, and how their use is different from arrows on most other warning signs.
Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

LeftyJR



I've been seeing W4-2 showing up in PA a lot lately.  I can't remember these being used much before about 2005.  What about everyone else?

shoptb1

Quote from: LeftyJR on March 17, 2010, 10:35:39 AM


I've been seeing W4-2 showing up in PA a lot lately.  I can't remember these being used much before about 2005.  What about everyone else?

These have been used in the Mid-South for a long time.  (Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, etc).  I personally DO NOT like this sign...mainly for the reason that it is unclear to people as to whether the left-hand solid black line represents the other side of the freeway, or a lane on the current side of the freeway.  This sign is confusing IMO.

Bryant5493

W4-2: I've started seeing this more recently. The older one didn't have the three broken lines.

W4-5: Haven't seen this one much, if at all.

The others I have seen.


Be well,

Bryant
Check out my YouTube page (http://youtube.com/Bryant5493). I have numerous road videos of Metro Atlanta and other areas in the Southeast.

I just signed up on photobucket -- here's my page (http://s594.photobucket.com/albums/tt24/Bryant5493).

Chris

#15
There are no such signs in Europe, we usually show this sign:

original

Scott5114

If people can't figure out what W4-2 means, then they are stupid. Really stupid. Unbelievably stupid. I mean dumb. Extremely dumb. Too dumb to be driving a car. Idiotic. Too idiotic to be on a reality television show. Very, very idiotic.
uncontrollable freak sardine salad chef

corco

Exactly- W4-2 is about as straightforward as a diagrammatic sign can get, plus it's a situation that happens really, really frequently! Even if there were some questions at the beginning, you'd expect people would catch on within a couple sightings. 


roadfro

#19
Quote from: shoptb1 on March 17, 2010, 10:53:48 AM
These <signs displayed above> have been used in the Mid-South for a long time.  (Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, etc).  I personally DO NOT like this <W4-2> sign...mainly for the reason that it is unclear to people as to whether the left-hand solid black line represents the other side of the freeway, or a lane on the current side of the freeway.  This sign is confusing IMO.
Quote from: corco on March 17, 2010, 12:32:09 PM
W4-2 is about as straightforward as a diagrammatic sign can get, plus it's a situation that happens really, really frequently! Even if there were some questions at the beginning, you'd expect people would catch on within a couple sightings.  

The W4-2 has been around for a while. As a kid who knew a lot about roads and signs, I have to say that the W4-2 sign was one of the few that confused me growing up. With just a straight line and a crooked line, it was one symbol that wasn't intuitive to me. However, this was before the broken lane line was added to the symbol.

Now, with the broken line, I agree that the meaning is quite clear. Not sure how the straight line could be interpreted as the other side of a freeway, especially given that the sign sees plenty of use on non-freeway facilities...

Quote from: Bryant5493 on March 17, 2010, 11:07:46 AM
W4-5: Haven't seen this one much, if at all.

The W4-5 and W4-6 signs are relatively new additions. They are meant to indicate the merge/added lane condition from the perspective of the ramp. I haven't seen either of these in the field--a couple of situations in Nevada where these could be applied, a W4-1 or W4-3 was posted on the left side of the ramp instead.
Roadfro - AARoads Pacific Southwest moderator since 2010, Nevada roadgeek since 1983.

shoptb1

Quote from: Scott5114 on March 17, 2010, 11:26:06 AM
If people can't figure out what W4-2 means, then they are stupid. Really stupid. Unbelievably stupid. I mean dumb. Extremely dumb. Too dumb to be driving a car. Idiotic. Too idiotic to be on a reality television show. Very, very idiotic.

The older version of W4-2 DID NOT have a dotted line, and as such was much more confusing.

Bryant5493

Here's an example W4-5, I think.

I-185 North transition ramp to I-85 North (Troup County, Georgia).

PHOTO


Be well,

Bryant
Check out my YouTube page (http://youtube.com/Bryant5493). I have numerous road videos of Metro Atlanta and other areas in the Southeast.

I just signed up on photobucket -- here's my page (http://s594.photobucket.com/albums/tt24/Bryant5493).

Michael

#22


Quote from: Bryant5493 on March 17, 2010, 11:07:46 AM
W4-2: I've started seeing this more recently. The older one didn't have the three broken lines.

Quote from: roadfro on March 17, 2010, 01:49:39 PM
The W4-2 has been around for a while. As a kid who knew a lot about roads and signs, I have to say that the W4-2 sign was one of the few that confused me growing up. With just a straight line and a crooked line, it was one symbol that wasn't intuitive to me. However, this was before the broken lane line was added to the symbol.

Quote from: shoptb1 on March 17, 2010, 02:00:00 PM
The older version of W4-2 DID NOT have a dotted line, and as such was much more confusing.

I've never seen the W4-2 with dashed lines.  I always assumed that the two lines were lanes in the same direction on the road.

Quote from: roadfro on March 17, 2010, 01:49:39 PM
Quote from: Bryant5493 on March 17, 2010, 11:07:46 AM
W4-5: Haven't seen this one much, if at all.

The W4-5 and W4-6 signs are relatively new additions. They are meant to indicate the merge/added lane condition from the perspective of the ramp. I haven't seen either of these in the field--a couple of situations in Nevada where these could be applied, a W4-1 or W4-3 was posted on the left side of the ramp instead.

Same here.  The only place I can think of where I've seen one is at the northern terminus of NY 174:

Credit: Gribblenation

This photo was taken at the western end of the NY 5 Camillus Bypass, which could use a W4-6 on the NY 5 West ramp.

On both freeways/expressways and surface roads, I like a W9-1 followed by a W4-2.  I also like a yellow overhead sign on freeways and expressways like the ones mentioned earlier in the thread. Here's one on the Camillus Bypass:

Credit: AARoads

The lane ends at the curve in the distance, but there are no rapid dashes or arrows pointing in the direction that you need to go.

NY 13/34 In Ithaca have a "LANE ENDS" sign over the far-right lane, and there are merge arrows on the pavement.  Here's a Street View image; I couldn't find anything better.

Here's an interesting "LANE ENDS" sign in Binghamton:

Credit: AARoads

@Revive: That's a weird diamond interchange at that first link!

joseph1723

The current lane ends sign that Ontario used is exactly like W4-2. I find the sign quite easy to understand but I agree the older one looks more like lane narrows to me. I've only seen one still left in the wild though. I've also seen W4-1 and W4-3 in Ontario although W4-1 is a lot more common than W4-3 here. I haven't seen the rest in the wild before. 

codyg1985

Quote from: Revive 755 on March 17, 2010, 12:41:56 PM
Here's a sign in Missouri warning of I-55 narrowing to two lanes in a few miles (though two of the lanes drop as exit only's);
http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=38.44564,-90.379093&spn=0,359.972534&z=16&layer=c&cbll=38.445555,-90.379112&panoid=i7mLAojGkMqz1-EUNrRfKA&cbp=12,186.51,,0,-12.3

There's another one at the next interchange:
http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=38.42041,-90.387397&spn=0,359.972534&z=16&layer=c&cbll=38.420328,-90.387422&panoid=WLsSnnX7eiYI357ElF71jA&cbp=12,209.06,,0,-21.09

That is a really nice idea to warn of lanes ending miles ahead of the actual merge.

Alabama does this and this with overhead sign gantries and the end of a lane. Unfortunately, no down arrow is present.

I like what Tennessee does better. They do a similar overhead sign as Alabama, except they put in a down arrow on the sign as well.
Cody Goodman
Huntsville, AL, United States



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