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Author Topic: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot  (Read 2461 times)

JoePCool14

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2021, 05:31:33 AM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.
Working together in-person with others does tend to make it easier though. I had several group projects this past semester, and the ones where I was able to actually meet with my group at the library at least partially turned out better.

Virtual collaboration can be done, especially if those engaging in it are prepared with dual monitors, good microphones, and good Internet, but again it's just not ideal. It's more of a backup when meeting is not possible.
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Rothman

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #26 on: June 14, 2021, 06:54:42 AM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.
Working together in-person with others does tend to make it easier though. I had several group projects this past semester, and the ones where I was able to actually meet with my group at the library at least partially turned out better.

Virtual collaboration can be done, especially if those engaging in it are prepared with dual monitors, good microphones, and good Internet, but again it's just not ideal. It's more of a backup when meeting is not possible.
One collaborative project does not necessitate people being together 8 hours a day, five days a week.

Have no problem with coming into the office when it would be more efficient to get a project done or two.  But, people whining about social interaction is starting to grate on me.  Go get your own friends instead of forcing me to come into the office so you can satisfy a need for attention.
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GaryV

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #27 on: June 14, 2021, 07:54:10 AM »

Given the conditions that they are talking about for my company, I'd rather stay WFH.  Even though the commute to the office is only 8-10 minutes.

- Hybrid model (part onsite, part WFH)
- No fixed location in the office - you "reserve" a "hotel" desk.
- Daily app check-in at home before going to work for COVID screening (typical "have you ever coughed" questions and temp check - are they going to give me a thermometer?), and then check in again once you arrive (please plan to arrive early to accommodate)
- Wear a mask whenever you are not in your cubicle

No thank you.  I'll collaborate online.
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formulanone

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2021, 08:20:23 AM »

Does Captain Obvious work for the NYT now?

It doesn't take much of a genius to figure out that if less people are going in to work, traffic will be lighter.



I think projections that this will have a significant impact on traffic are going to look pretty back in five years.

...probably all offset by all the delivery drivers, freight trucks, and task-runners who cannot literally work from home.

...that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.

May I borrow this line? I encounter some people who really need to hear that bit of advice.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2021, 08:24:55 AM by formulanone »
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SEWIGuy

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2021, 11:17:12 AM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.
Not if one member is an unwilling participant.

Well then they won't be working for me for long.
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SEWIGuy

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #30 on: June 14, 2021, 11:19:02 AM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.


I am in an industry that requires creativity and communication throughout the day.  We are much better in person.  I think it's cute that you know how to do my job.
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Rothman

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #31 on: June 14, 2021, 11:22:02 AM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.


I am in an industry that requires creativity and communication throughout the day.  We are much better in person.  I think it's cute that you know how to do my job.
Yep, you've got some staff that needs babysitting.
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kalvado

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #32 on: June 14, 2021, 11:22:46 AM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.
Not if one member is an unwilling participant.

Well then they won't be working for me for long.
Good luck with getting your team running in current labor situation, though.
Did you consider making ties mandatory part of office dress code as well?
Things are changing, and more remote may become an expected part of office operations.
Of course, assembly line folks have to be on site - but that not is the job that requires creativity, though. 
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SEWIGuy

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #33 on: June 14, 2021, 11:27:05 AM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.
Not if one member is an unwilling participant.

Well then they won't be working for me for long.
Good luck with getting your team running in current labor situation, though.
Did you consider making ties mandatory part of office dress code as well?
Things are changing, and more remote may become an expected part of office operations.
Of course, assembly line folks have to be on site - but that not is the job that requires creativity, though. 



My team is fine.  We have no dress code.  And I am expecting remote to an exception not the rule. 

And if people want to work full remote, they can work elsewhere.  The requirement to work almost entirely on-site has not hindered any of the searches we have had recently.
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Rothman

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #34 on: June 14, 2021, 11:30:34 AM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.
Not if one member is an unwilling participant.

Well then they won't be working for me for long.
Good luck with getting your team running in current labor situation, though.
Did you consider making ties mandatory part of office dress code as well?
Things are changing, and more remote may become an expected part of office operations.
Of course, assembly line folks have to be on site - but that not is the job that requires creativity, though. 



My team is fine.  We have no dress code.  And I am expecting remote to an exception not the rule. 

And if people want to work full remote, they can work elsewhere.  The requirement to work almost entirely on-site has not hindered any of the searches we have had recently.
So, as long as you can hire someone, your team is fine.

We are back into tripping hazard standards again.
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SEWIGuy

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #35 on: June 14, 2021, 12:25:38 PM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.
Not if one member is an unwilling participant.

Well then they won't be working for me for long.
Good luck with getting your team running in current labor situation, though.
Did you consider making ties mandatory part of office dress code as well?
Things are changing, and more remote may become an expected part of office operations.
Of course, assembly line folks have to be on site - but that not is the job that requires creativity, though. 



My team is fine.  We have no dress code.  And I am expecting remote to an exception not the rule. 

And if people want to work full remote, they can work elsewhere.  The requirement to work almost entirely on-site has not hindered any of the searches we have had recently.
So, as long as you can hire someone, your team is fine.

We are back into tripping hazard standards again.


No you aren't understanding my point.  We largely require people to work here.  The vast majority of people who work here, want to work in person.  If you don't want to do that, this probably is not the best place for you to be.
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kalvado

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #36 on: June 14, 2021, 12:52:50 PM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.
Not if one member is an unwilling participant.

Well then they won't be working for me for long.
Good luck with getting your team running in current labor situation, though.
Did you consider making ties mandatory part of office dress code as well?
Things are changing, and more remote may become an expected part of office operations.
Of course, assembly line folks have to be on site - but that not is the job that requires creativity, though. 



My team is fine.  We have no dress code.  And I am expecting remote to an exception not the rule. 

And if people want to work full remote, they can work elsewhere.  The requirement to work almost entirely on-site has not hindered any of the searches we have had recently.
So, as long as you can hire someone, your team is fine.

We are back into tripping hazard standards again.


No you aren't understanding my point.  We largely require people to work here.  The vast majority of people who work here, want to work in person.  If you don't want to do that, this probably is not the best place for you to be.
There are certainly in-person only jobs. There are situations. where in-person is not required, but beneficial. Or acceptable.
There are certainly people who prefer one or the other.

It is hard to tell without knowing exactly what this is about. 
Point is, everyone may benefit from more flexibility. Once anyone switches to rigid rules - one way or the other, one side or the other -  things may backfire at some point. The best course of action is to keep eyes open and look at the situation beyond simple "yes" and "no". ANthing new about that, though?
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vdeane

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #37 on: June 14, 2021, 01:32:47 PM »

Early on in the pandemic, I realized that this was probably going to be for the long-haul.  I bought myself 2 monitors to hook up to my laptop so I would have a home set-up as if I was in the office. It was $210 well spent.  I know not everyone had the means to do this, but many people figured if work won't provide them with the tools to work, then they weren't going to bother.  These people put themselves in a situation where helping themselves and spending just a few dollars would've been beneficial for the next year (and longer, at this point).
In my case, buying monitors wouldn't help.  My work computer is a desktop that on WFH days I need to access with a remote connection, either the Pulse Secure remote desktop, back when it still supported my (ancient, used only for this) Windows 7 laptop, or via the VMware Horizon VDI in browser.  As in both cases the remote connection is a window, I'd still only have one monitor available for my work computer.  Not that I have room for a second monitor on my desk anyways.  My desk dates back from the 2000s when such was not common, and between the raised platforms on the sides and the cabinets on top, I only have room for one.  I was going to try putting a second in close at an angle when I got my current desktop at home, but when I realized how much more problematic that was than I thought, I abandoned the idea and the monitor I bought became a replacement for the old one rather than a supplement.  I'd love to replace the desk, for more reasons than just that, but I'd not only need to figure out where to put all the stuff that's up top, I'd also need to figure out how to assemble the new desk and get the old desk out of my apartment on my own, as I have nobody to help.  My combined living room/office doesn't really have a ton of extra space, either.

Newer computers issued at work tend to be laptops for this reason, so maybe it will get easier in the future.  That said, my desktop was issued in January 2020, so it might be a while.

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.


I am in an industry that requires creativity and communication throughout the day.  We are much better in person.  I think it's cute that you know how to do my job.
Yep, you've got some staff that needs babysitting.
Now you're starting to remind me of the manager here who used to talk about "hard planning" and "soft planning".  Some jobs are just more spontaneous/collaborative.  And it's often easier to just ask someone something rather than send an email.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2021, 01:54:28 PM by vdeane »
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cpzilliacus

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #38 on: June 14, 2021, 01:40:17 PM »

Getting back to the original article, I think that there will be significant telework for the indefinite future.  Teleworking may impact transit more than highway commuting (at the TRB Annual Meeting in January, there were some presenters that predicted that transit has permanently lost about 1/3 of its pre-COVD19 ridership. 

Long-range transportation plans should probably include telework as a mode of transportation (and one that has little or no tailpipe emissions associated with it).
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SEWIGuy

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #39 on: June 14, 2021, 02:14:15 PM »

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.


I am in an industry that requires creativity and communication throughout the day.  We are much better in person.  I think it's cute that you know how to do my job.
Yep, you've got some staff that needs babysitting.

Nope.  Good lord you are close-mided.



Some jobs are just more spontaneous/collaborative.  And it's often easier to just ask someone something rather than send an email.

Yep.
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Scott5114

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #40 on: June 14, 2021, 02:56:32 PM »

...that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.

May I borrow this line? I encounter some people who really need to hear that bit of advice.

Go for it, I shamelessly stole it from elsewhere on the internet anyway. :-D
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bing101

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #41 on: June 14, 2021, 04:45:05 PM »

Early on in the pandemic, I realized that this was probably going to be for the long-haul.  I bought myself 2 monitors to hook up to my laptop so I would have a home set-up as if I was in the office. It was $210 well spent.  I know not everyone had the means to do this, but many people figured if work won't provide them with the tools to work, then they weren't going to bother.  These people put themselves in a situation where helping themselves and spending just a few dollars would've been beneficial for the next year (and longer, at this point).
In my case, buying monitors wouldn't help.  My work computer is a desktop that on WFH days I need to access with a remote connection, either the Pulse Secure remote desktop, back when it still supported my (ancient, used only for this) Windows 7 laptop, or via the VMware Horizon VDI in browser.  As in both cases the remote connection is a window, I'd still only have one monitor available for my work computer.  Not that I have room for a second monitor on my desk anyways.  My desk dates back from the 2000s when such was not common, and between the raised platforms on the sides and the cabinets on top, I only have room for one.  I was going to try putting a second in close at an angle when I got my current desktop at home, but when I realized how much more problematic that was than I thought, I abandoned the idea and the monitor I bought became a replacement for the old one rather than a supplement.  I'd love to replace the desk, for more reasons than just that, but I'd not only need to figure out where to put all the stuff that's up top, I'd also need to figure out how to assemble the new desk and get the old desk out of my apartment on my own, as I have nobody to help.  My combined living room/office doesn't really have a ton of extra space, either.

Newer computers issued at work tend to be laptops for this reason, so maybe it will get easier in the future.  That said, my desktop was issued in January 2020, so it might be a while.

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.


I am in an industry that requires creativity and communication throughout the day.  We are much better in person.  I think it's cute that you know how to do my job.
Yep, you've got some staff that needs babysitting.
Now you're starting to remind me of the manager here who used to talk about "hard planning" and "soft planning".  Some jobs are just more spontaneous/collaborative.  And it's often easier to just ask someone something rather than send an email.
True unless you are mainly a novel writer, blogger or a host on Twitch and YouTube at least some jobs need to be on site.
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3467

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #42 on: June 14, 2021, 05:06:59 PM »

Previous comment on delivery drivers. NBC has a story on that last night. Online shopping is also here to stay. It's about a third of non car non grocery retail now.
And the delivery trucks seem to add to the afternoon bump.
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Rothman

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #43 on: June 14, 2021, 05:22:52 PM »

Early on in the pandemic, I realized that this was probably going to be for the long-haul.  I bought myself 2 monitors to hook up to my laptop so I would have a home set-up as if I was in the office. It was $210 well spent.  I know not everyone had the means to do this, but many people figured if work won't provide them with the tools to work, then they weren't going to bother.  These people put themselves in a situation where helping themselves and spending just a few dollars would've been beneficial for the next year (and longer, at this point).
In my case, buying monitors wouldn't help.  My work computer is a desktop that on WFH days I need to access with a remote connection, either the Pulse Secure remote desktop, back when it still supported my (ancient, used only for this) Windows 7 laptop, or via the VMware Horizon VDI in browser.  As in both cases the remote connection is a window, I'd still only have one monitor available for my work computer.  Not that I have room for a second monitor on my desk anyways.  My desk dates back from the 2000s when such was not common, and between the raised platforms on the sides and the cabinets on top, I only have room for one.  I was going to try putting a second in close at an angle when I got my current desktop at home, but when I realized how much more problematic that was than I thought, I abandoned the idea and the monitor I bought became a replacement for the old one rather than a supplement.  I'd love to replace the desk, for more reasons than just that, but I'd not only need to figure out where to put all the stuff that's up top, I'd also need to figure out how to assemble the new desk and get the old desk out of my apartment on my own, as I have nobody to help.  My combined living room/office doesn't really have a ton of extra space, either.

Newer computers issued at work tend to be laptops for this reason, so maybe it will get easier in the future.  That said, my desktop was issued in January 2020, so it might be a while.

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.


I am in an industry that requires creativity and communication throughout the day.  We are much better in person.  I think it's cute that you know how to do my job.
Yep, you've got some staff that needs babysitting.
Now you're starting to remind me of the manager here who used to talk about "hard planning" and "soft planning".  Some jobs are just more spontaneous/collaborative.  And it's often easier to just ask someone something rather than send an email.
There is a way to get the Pulse window to spread across two monitors.  It involves setting up a new session link with different parameters than the default.

Too bad we are almost done WFH...
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Rothman

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #44 on: June 14, 2021, 05:25:46 PM »



I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.


I am in an industry that requires creativity and communication throughout the day.  We are much better in person.  I think it's cute that you know how to do my job.
Yep, you've got some staff that needs babysitting.

Nope.  Good lord you are close-mided.


Nah.  Just calling them as I see 'em.  I know management euphemisms when I see them.  "We need to be collaborative and cooperative and therefore need to be in-person where it works better" = "Some of you don't work as well remotely and ruin it for the rest of us."

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74/171FAN

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #45 on: June 14, 2021, 05:37:59 PM »

Quote
Nah.  Just calling them as I see 'em.  I know management euphemisms when I see them.  "We need to be collaborative and cooperative and therefore need to be in-person where it works better" = "Some of you don't work as well remotely and ruin it for the rest of us."

I agree with you completely Rothman.  I probably have worked better at home than in the office because it was much easier for me to deal with the noise once I bought my own headphones and started listening to videos throughout the day.
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Scott5114

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #46 on: June 14, 2021, 05:54:31 PM »



I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.


I am in an industry that requires creativity and communication throughout the day.  We are much better in person.  I think it's cute that you know how to do my job.
Yep, you've got some staff that needs babysitting.

Nope.  Good lord you are close-mided.


Nah.  Just calling them as I see 'em.  I know management euphemisms when I see them.  "We need to be collaborative and cooperative and therefore need to be in-person where it works better" = "Some of you don't work as well remotely and ruin it for the rest of us."

Or, more cynically, "I feel insecure about my abilities as a manager if I only have a finished product to judge performance on and can't spy on people to criticize how they're working."
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vdeane

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #47 on: June 14, 2021, 09:29:26 PM »

Early on in the pandemic, I realized that this was probably going to be for the long-haul.  I bought myself 2 monitors to hook up to my laptop so I would have a home set-up as if I was in the office. It was $210 well spent.  I know not everyone had the means to do this, but many people figured if work won't provide them with the tools to work, then they weren't going to bother.  These people put themselves in a situation where helping themselves and spending just a few dollars would've been beneficial for the next year (and longer, at this point).
In my case, buying monitors wouldn't help.  My work computer is a desktop that on WFH days I need to access with a remote connection, either the Pulse Secure remote desktop, back when it still supported my (ancient, used only for this) Windows 7 laptop, or via the VMware Horizon VDI in browser.  As in both cases the remote connection is a window, I'd still only have one monitor available for my work computer.  Not that I have room for a second monitor on my desk anyways.  My desk dates back from the 2000s when such was not common, and between the raised platforms on the sides and the cabinets on top, I only have room for one.  I was going to try putting a second in close at an angle when I got my current desktop at home, but when I realized how much more problematic that was than I thought, I abandoned the idea and the monitor I bought became a replacement for the old one rather than a supplement.  I'd love to replace the desk, for more reasons than just that, but I'd not only need to figure out where to put all the stuff that's up top, I'd also need to figure out how to assemble the new desk and get the old desk out of my apartment on my own, as I have nobody to help.  My combined living room/office doesn't really have a ton of extra space, either.

Newer computers issued at work tend to be laptops for this reason, so maybe it will get easier in the future.  That said, my desktop was issued in January 2020, so it might be a while.

I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.


I am in an industry that requires creativity and communication throughout the day.  We are much better in person.  I think it's cute that you know how to do my job.
Yep, you've got some staff that needs babysitting.
Now you're starting to remind me of the manager here who used to talk about "hard planning" and "soft planning".  Some jobs are just more spontaneous/collaborative.  And it's often easier to just ask someone something rather than send an email.
There is a way to get the Pulse window to spread across two monitors.  It involves setting up a new session link with different parameters than the default.

Too bad we are almost done WFH...
Interesting.  Too bad they stopped supporting Windows 7; I don't have Windows 10 at home (my main desktop and laptop are both Linux, and the ancient laptop with Windows 7 is dying anyways).  Or the space on my desk, for that matter (I really should replace it one of these days...).
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kphoger

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #48 on: June 15, 2021, 11:56:47 AM »


The type of work that should be judged by the hour will always be done in person.  People who can work from home should by and large be salaried. 

That depends on what they are doing.  For example, call center employees can work at home if they have good telephone and Internet connections.

Yep.  Even though I can theoretically work from home (and did for seven weeks back in March-May of last year), I'm still expected to answer the phone, respond to e-mails, and such during specific hours.  There are also tasks that have to be done by a certain time on a certain day.  In short, the reasons for my having fixed work hours didn't magically go away just because I was working from home instead of my office.

And yeah, think about call center agents (with whom I interact occasionally at work).  Their shifts are determined by expected call volumes, which don't magically change just because they're working from home instead of the office.  A lot of people can't just decide to do their work at whatever hour suits them, for a variety of reasons.




I have no objection to those who want to be in the office.  Just don't drag me in with you just because you want social interaction.

No but I will drag you there because I believe a sense of place benefits teamwork.

If you can't work together without being physically in the same room as someone you're a pretty piss-poor team to begin with. Or at least, you're admitting you're worse at teamwork than your average Wikipedian, or Linus Torvalds, and that bar is so low it's a tripping hazard.

Working together in-person with others does tend to make it easier though. I had several group projects this past semester, and the ones where I was able to actually meet with my group at the library at least partially turned out better.

Virtual collaboration can be done, especially if those engaging in it are prepared with dual monitors, good microphones, and good Internet, but again it's just not ideal. It's more of a backup when meeting is not possible.

So true.  Being trained to do a new task without being together in person is so much harder—at least at my job.  It's much easier to just point at something with your finger, read what notes your trainee is writing down to see if there's any confusion, switch places at the keyboard every so often...

In my case, buying monitors wouldn't help.  My work computer is a desktop that on WFH days I need to access with a remote connection, either the Pulse Secure remote desktop, back when it still supported my (ancient, used only for this) Windows 7 laptop, or via the VMware Horizon VDI in browser.  As in both cases the remote connection is a window, I'd still only have one monitor available for my work computer.  Not that I have room for a second monitor on my desk anyways.

When I worked from home, the CEO of the company delivered all the components to me in a box on my front porch (tower, dual monitors, keyboard, mouse, speakers, cables).  Every day, I use two different MFA VPN connections (GlobalProtect and one powered by Citrix), and once or twice a week I launch a virtual desktop.

I have a co-worker who has a similar situation to yours:  when working from home, he has to remotely access his work computer.  That means that, if there's an issue with his work computer, he has to get in the car and drive to the office to fix it—having to figure out a way to get in the secure building if his access card isn't set up to grant access on that day and the others in his department are also working from home.
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jeffandnicole

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Re: A Little More Remote Work Could Change Rush Hour a Lot
« Reply #49 on: June 15, 2021, 12:11:23 PM »

No you aren't understanding my point.  We largely require people to work here.  The vast majority of people who work here, want to work in person.  If you don't want to do that, this probably is not the best place for you to be.

Your point seems to be that people "want" to work there.  Being that you are pretty open to saying "If you don't want to be here, work elsewhere", your staff is probably not very open to telling you the truth if they truly want to work in the office or at home.

And when offices operate like that, chances are the staff isn't very open about other things.
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