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North Carolina

Started by FLRoads, January 20, 2009, 11:55:15 PM

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The Ghostbuster

How does everyone feel about renaming Fort Bragg to Fort Liberty? I personally don't have an opinion on the matter, although I am aware that Braxton Bragg did fight for the Confederacy (thus why they named the fort for him in the first place). Bragg also fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican-American War: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braxton_Bragg.


Rothman

Quote from: cowboy_wilhelm on May 29, 2024, 08:50:58 AMThe quantitative scores for projects evaluated for the upcoming 2026-2035 STIP have been released (Prioritization 7.0). Part of this release includes projects that are selected for funding in the statewide mobility category. This is draft, and additional projects are selected at the regional and division category for inclusion in the STIP. Not all projects receive a statewide mobility score. Projects that are already "committed" in the current STIP are not subject to reprioritization.

In total, there are 587 submitted projects in the spreadsheet costing an estimated $65.67 billion. Maybe a web map is in the works like has been done in the past.

Only 13 projects were selected for funding in the statewide mobility category. I don't think scores are supposed to be compared due to different metrics across project types, divisions, etc., but somehow the top scoring "statewide mobility" project is a $1 million signal improvement project on U.S. 17 in Hampstead. The third highest scored project is to construct a reduced conflict intersection at the same location. This route will be bypassed in a few years. Kinda strange that these would get scored so high for "statewide mobility." I know it's a busy area, hence the upcoming bypass, but still seems off.

Next up are improvements to U.S. 1 north of I-540 from Durant Rd to N.C. 98 in Wake Forest. It looks like Section B is listed twice, once by itself and again with Section C. Section A is already funded in the current STIP.

I-77 improvements from the S.C. line to Exit 11 (managed toll lanes) also make the cut. The entire project is listed, and also just Section A to Exit 9. The "cost to NCDOT" after accounting for toll revenue is $2.7 billion for both projects that are listed. The "actual project cost" before toll revenue is $7.2 billion. About $2.5 billion of that is just for right-of-way. Yikes....

Other statewide mobility projects include replacement of the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge with a tolled bridge and more express lanes on I-485 in the southwestern corner of the loop between I-85 and I-77.

And since this is North Carolina, the total number of projects categorized as "Upgrade Freeway to Interstate Standards" comes in at 17 with a total cost of $3.55 billion, and the number of projects categorized as "Upgrade Expressway to Freeway" (most of these look like future interstates) totals 13 at $3.84 billion.

The link below will download the Excel spreadsheet with the scores.

https://connect.ncdot.gov/projects/planning/Prioritization%20Data/Prioritization%207.0%20(P7)/Results/P7%20Quantitative%20Scores%20-%20All%20Projects%205-24-24_For%20Transmittal.xlsx

Makes me wonder about how NCDOT works with the MPOs for their TIPs.  The actual sponsors of the projects do not seem to be listed.

Do they have some sort of statewide agreement that everything gets scored altogether by NCDOT, rather than at the MPO level?

Bonus points for their scores going to the hundredth on all those columns for perceived accuracy. :D
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

jdunlop

Quote from: Rothman on May 29, 2024, 12:28:09 PMMakes me wonder about how NCDOT works with the MPOs for their TIPs.  The actual sponsors of the projects do not seem to be listed.

Do they have some sort of statewide agreement that everything gets scored altogether by NCDOT, rather than at the MPO level?

Bonus points for their scores going to the hundredth on all those columns for perceived accuracy. :D

The MPO/RPO is allocated a set number of projects that they can submit for scoring.  The larger ones have more slots than the smaller ones (no surprise there.)

The Divisions also have a set number of projects they can submit.  (I think it's the same for all 14 divisions, but don't recall specifics.)  They usually coordinate with the MPOs so as to not duplicate project submittals.

All scoring is done by NCDOT.  Most are done based on formulas developed by the SPOT office.  Certain projects have components that are developed/scored by various groups within NCDOT.  For instance, intersection/interchange project traffic savings scores are done by the Congestion Management Section, as a general formula would not provide a reasonable result (some submitted projects would actually make travel time worse, as an example.)

roadman65

#5428
Quote from: The Ghostbuster on May 29, 2024, 11:51:06 AMHow does everyone feel about renaming Fort Bragg to Fort Liberty? I personally don't have an opinion on the matter, although I am aware that Braxton Bragg did fight for the Confederacy (thus why they named the fort for him in the first place). Bragg also fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican-American War: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braxton_Bragg.

To be honest with you, unless you research it, you would have never known who Braxton Bragg is. I didn't until the name change.

Then Fort Gordon to Fort Eisenhower and the military installation near Killeen, TX now renamed Fort Cavazoz all at the same time is way too much.  Especially because of what happened in history the past decade with all these solo crackpots doing terror. Of course some in Congress believes historical confederate names influences the mentally ill especially those who are subconsciously bigots, so now this action is needed.
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe

PColumbus73

Quote from: roadman65 on May 29, 2024, 01:04:48 PM
Quote from: The Ghostbuster on May 29, 2024, 11:51:06 AMHow does everyone feel about renaming Fort Bragg to Fort Liberty? I personally don't have an opinion on the matter, although I am aware that Braxton Bragg did fight for the Confederacy (thus why they named the fort for him in the first place). Bragg also fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican-American War: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braxton_Bragg.

To be honest with you, unless you research it, you would have never known who Braxton Bragg is. I didn't until the name change.

Then Fort Gordon to Fort Eisenhower and the military installation near Killeen, TX now renamed Fort Cavazoz all at the same time is way too much.  Especially because of what happened in history the past decade with all these solo crackpots doing terror. Of course some in Congress believes historical confederate names influences the mentally ill especially those who are subconsciously bigots, so now this action is needed.

Having been born in Fort Hood / Killeen, and partly grew up on Fort Bragg, I'm somewhat attached to their former names. Moreso with Fort Bragg since I spent more of my childhood there. Never really knew who they were named after until they announced they were renaming them.

wdcrft63

Quote from: The Ghostbuster on May 29, 2024, 11:51:06 AMHow does everyone feel about renaming Fort Bragg to Fort Liberty? I personally don't have an opinion on the matter, although I am aware that Braxton Bragg did fight for the Confederacy (thus why they named the fort for him in the first place). Bragg also fought in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican-American War: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braxton_Bragg.
The name Fort Liberty could have gone anywhere. The Army missed an obvious choice: Fort Ridgway, after Matthew Ridgway. He commanded the 82nd Airborne at D-Day and was later Supreme Commander for NATO and Army Chief of Staff.


bob7374

Quote from: Rothman on May 29, 2024, 12:28:09 PM
Quote from: cowboy_wilhelm on May 29, 2024, 08:50:58 AMThe quantitative scores for projects evaluated for the upcoming 2026-2035 STIP have been released (Prioritization 7.0). Part of this release includes projects that are selected for funding in the statewide mobility category. This is draft, and additional projects are selected at the regional and division category for inclusion in the STIP. Not all projects receive a statewide mobility score. Projects that are already "committed" in the current STIP are not subject to reprioritization.

In total, there are 587 submitted projects in the spreadsheet costing an estimated $65.67 billion. Maybe a web map is in the works like has been done in the past.

Only 13 projects were selected for funding in the statewide mobility category. I don't think scores are supposed to be compared due to different metrics across project types, divisions, etc., but somehow the top scoring "statewide mobility" project is a $1 million signal improvement project on U.S. 17 in Hampstead. The third highest scored project is to construct a reduced conflict intersection at the same location. This route will be bypassed in a few years. Kinda strange that these would get scored so high for "statewide mobility." I know it's a busy area, hence the upcoming bypass, but still seems off.

Next up are improvements to U.S. 1 north of I-540 from Durant Rd to N.C. 98 in Wake Forest. It looks like Section B is listed twice, once by itself and again with Section C. Section A is already funded in the current STIP.

I-77 improvements from the S.C. line to Exit 11 (managed toll lanes) also make the cut. The entire project is listed, and also just Section A to Exit 9. The "cost to NCDOT" after accounting for toll revenue is $2.7 billion for both projects that are listed. The "actual project cost" before toll revenue is $7.2 billion. About $2.5 billion of that is just for right-of-way. Yikes....

Other statewide mobility projects include replacement of the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge with a tolled bridge and more express lanes on I-485 in the southwestern corner of the loop between I-85 and I-77.

And since this is North Carolina, the total number of projects categorized as "Upgrade Freeway to Interstate Standards" comes in at 17 with a total cost of $3.55 billion, and the number of projects categorized as "Upgrade Expressway to Freeway" (most of these look like future interstates) totals 13 at $3.84 billion.

The link below will download the Excel spreadsheet with the scores.

https://connect.ncdot.gov/projects/planning/Prioritization%20Data/Prioritization%207.0%20(P7)/Results/P7%20Quantitative%20Scores%20-%20All%20Projects%205-24-24_For%20Transmittal.xlsx

Makes me wonder about how NCDOT works with the MPOs for their TIPs.  The actual sponsors of the projects do not seem to be listed.

Do they have some sort of statewide agreement that everything gets scored altogether by NCDOT, rather than at the MPO level?

Bonus points for their scores going to the hundredth on all those columns for perceived accuracy. :D
Many of the interstate upgrade projects listed did not score high enough for inclusion in past STIPS or were ones not funded in the current STIP. I did notice a few new ones however, though many of these score fairly low as well:
US 52 (to I-74) from King (Exit 123) to SR 1147 (Exit 129) Statewide Mobility Score (SMS) 60.15
US 52 (to I-74) from Stokes County Line to I-74 SMS 51.14
US 70 (to I-42) from end of Havelock Bypass to Morehead City SMS 57.61, but also an alternative--
US 70/NC 101 (to I-42) Northern Carteret Bypass SMS 71.87
US 220 (To I-73) from NC 68 to NC 135 SMS 62.40
US 264 (to I-587) from US 64 to I-95 SMS 68.91

Then there are these which currently don't match up to any planned interstate route:
US 1 from NC 540 to Tramway (A new I-640? An extended I-87?) SMS 50.82
US 64 from I-26 to Shelby Bypass (Part of Future I-426?) SMS 66.54
US 264/NC 11 Bypass from Stantonsburg Road to US 13/NC 11 (An I-587 extension?) SMS 54.18

cowboy_wilhelm

The U.S. 74 project from I-26 was first pitched for prioritization around 2014 and hasn't made it into the STIP since, and there hasn't been any action on the House Bill that was introduced last April to designate it as a future interstate. It will be interesting to see if or how quickly it advances since it was written into the state budget this year and if Moore is elected to the U.S. House in the fall (probably). Quarter of a billion dollars seems a bit crazy for that upgrade and all of the others.

sprjus4

Quote from: cowboy_wilhelm on May 30, 2024, 10:25:28 AMThe U.S. 74 project from I-26 was first pitched for prioritization around 2014 and hasn't made it into the STIP since, and there hasn't been any action on the House Bill that was introduced last April to designate it as a future interstate. It will be interesting to see if or how quickly it advances since it was written into the state budget this year and if Moore is elected to the U.S. House in the fall (probably). Quarter of a billion dollars seems a bit crazy for that upgrade and all of the others.
I'm guessing a mix of bridge replacements (given that portions of the freeway date back to the 60-70s I believe) and interchange reconfigurations to bring them up to modern standards and for the mainline design speed (70-75 mph). Also pavement reconstruction, etc.

ARMOURERERIC

Quote from: bob7374 on May 29, 2024, 11:24:08 PM
Quote from: Rothman on May 29, 2024, 12:28:09 PM
Quote from: cowboy_wilhelm on May 29, 2024, 08:50:58 AMThe quantitative scores for projects evaluated for the upcoming 2026-2035 STIP have been released (Prioritization 7.0). Part of this release includes projects that are selected for funding in the statewide mobility category. This is draft, and additional projects are selected at the regional and division category for inclusion in the STIP. Not all projects receive a statewide mobility score. Projects that are already "committed" in the current STIP are not subject to reprioritization.

In total, there are 587 submitted projects in the spreadsheet costing an estimated $65.67 billion. Maybe a web map is in the works like has been done in the past.

Only 13 projects were selected for funding in the statewide mobility category. I don't think scores are supposed to be compared due to different metrics across project types, divisions, etc., but somehow the top scoring "statewide mobility" project is a $1 million signal improvement project on U.S. 17 in Hampstead. The third highest scored project is to construct a reduced conflict intersection at the same location. This route will be bypassed in a few years. Kinda strange that these would get scored so high for "statewide mobility." I know it's a busy area, hence the upcoming bypass, but still seems off.

Next up are improvements to U.S. 1 north of I-540 from Durant Rd to N.C. 98 in Wake Forest. It looks like Section B is listed twice, once by itself and again with Section C. Section A is already funded in the current STIP.

I-77 improvements from the S.C. line to Exit 11 (managed toll lanes) also make the cut. The entire project is listed, and also just Section A to Exit 9. The "cost to NCDOT" after accounting for toll revenue is $2.7 billion for both projects that are listed. The "actual project cost" before toll revenue is $7.2 billion. About $2.5 billion of that is just for right-of-way. Yikes....

Other statewide mobility projects include replacement of the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge with a tolled bridge and more express lanes on I-485 in the southwestern corner of the loop between I-85 and I-77.

And since this is North Carolina, the total number of projects categorized as "Upgrade Freeway to Interstate Standards" comes in at 17 with a total cost of $3.55 billion, and the number of projects categorized as "Upgrade Expressway to Freeway" (most of these look like future interstates) totals 13 at $3.84 billion.

The link below will download the Excel spreadsheet with the scores.

https://connect.ncdot.gov/projects/planning/Prioritization%20Data/Prioritization%207.0%20(P7)/Results/P7%20Quantitative%20Scores%20-%20All%20Projects%205-24-24_For%20Transmittal.xlsx

Makes me wonder about how NCDOT works with the MPOs for their TIPs.  The actual sponsors of the projects do not seem to be listed.

Do they have some sort of statewide agreement that everything gets scored altogether by NCDOT, rather than at the MPO level?

Bonus points for their scores going to the hundredth on all those columns for perceived accuracy. :D
Many of the interstate upgrade projects listed did not score high enough for inclusion in past STIPS or were ones not funded in the current STIP. I did notice a few new ones however, though many of these score fairly low as well:
US 52 (to I-74) from King (Exit 123) to SR 1147 (Exit 129) Statewide Mobility Score (SMS) 60.15
US 52 (to I-74) from Stokes County Line to I-74 SMS 51.14
US 70 (to I-42) from end of Havelock Bypass to Morehead City SMS 57.61, but also an alternative--
US 70/NC 101 (to I-42) Northern Carteret Bypass SMS 71.87
US 220 (To I-73) from NC 68 to NC 135 SMS 62.40
US 264 (to I-587) from US 64 to I-95 SMS 68.91

Then there are these which currently don't match up to any planned interstate route:
US 1 from NC 540 to Tramway (A new I-640? An extended I-87?) SMS 50.82
US 64 from I-26 to Shelby Bypass (Part of Future I-426?) SMS 66.54
US 264/NC 11 Bypass from Stantonsburg Road to US 13/NC 11 (An I-587 extension?) SMS 54.18

What score level would be needed to make the cut

CanesFan27

Beaman Road is an old piece of the long-forgotten Central Highway west of New Bern.  It is a dirt and brick oxbow off NC 55, about seven miles from the Craven County Courthouse.  It is easily overlooked by hundreds of travelers each day. 

If you decide to take this quick detour off Highway 55, you'll go past a few rural ranch homes and some farmland. The road is a mix of brick, asphalt, and dirt.  Then, as you approach Caswell Branch, a sign reads, "One Lane Bridge."  Like others that cross over the many creeks and streams in Eastern North Carolina, the bridge isn't that long.  Yet, it is the oldest surviving bridge of its kind in North Carolina.

Feature on the Caswell Branch Bridge and Beaman Road:
https://www.carolinaxroads.com/2024/05/caswell-branch-bridge-and-beaman-road.html

LM117

NC-751 in Durham between Kerley Road and Duke University Road has been named the "Coach K Highway".

Ew...

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/2024/2024-05-31-coach-k-highway.aspx
“I don’t know whether to wind my ass or scratch my watch!” - Jim Cornette

wdcrft63

Quote from: LM117 on May 31, 2024, 05:17:57 PMNC-751 in Durham between Kerley Road and Duke University Road has been named the "Coach K Highway".

Ew...

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/2024/2024-05-31-coach-k-highway.aspx
This section of NC 751 passes through the Duke Forest and Duke campus so it's not unreasonable for Duke to name it. But it's a state owned highway so the university needed NCDOT to approve the name. Sections of I-40 passing Chapel Hill are named for Dean Smith and Roy Williams.

wdcrft63

NCDOT has awarded a contract to replace the two bridges carrying NC 55 over the Neuse River wetland in Lenore County. The current bridges were built in 1937, have no shoulders, and have a 30 ton weight restriction.
https://www.ncdot.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/2024/2024-06-10-lenoir-county-bridge-replacements.aspx

LM117

“I don’t know whether to wind my ass or scratch my watch!” - Jim Cornette

LM117

“I don’t know whether to wind my ass or scratch my watch!” - Jim Cornette

snowc

Alright, why did NCDOT close I-95 North ramp for US 421 traffic? I noticed it said Permanent Road Closure on the DriveNC map as well.
southeastern road geek since 2001.
here's my clinched counties https://mob-rule.com/user/snowc
and my clinched roads https://travelmapping.net/user/?units=miles&u=snowc
i'm on kartaview as well https://kartaview.org/user/computer-geek
wikipedia too https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:BryceM2001

froggie

Quote from: snowc on June 20, 2024, 02:54:37 PMAlright, why did NCDOT close I-95 North ramp for US 421 traffic? I noticed it said Permanent Road Closure on the DriveNC map as well.

As part of the widening project, they're converting the US 421 and Pope Rd interchanges into a single, split-diamond interchange.

CanesFan27

I drove out on Sunday to check out the bridge.

Photos and feature here:

https://www.carolinaxroads.com/2024/06/chatham-bridge-147-chatham-church-road.html

Quote from: CanesFan27 on May 28, 2024, 08:45:42 PMOlder truss bridges in the Tar Heel State are a rarity, and we may be losing another one.  The Chatham Church Road bridge over the Rocky River - a 104-year-old Pratt Truss bridge with pinned connections - was indefinitely closed recently due to the deterioration of steel components.  The bridge's closure was decided after a routine inspection.

The Atlantic Bridge Company out of Charlotte built the historic one-lane bridge and opened to traffic in July 1921.  Over the past 50 years, residents have stopped several attempts by the NC Department of Transportation to replace the bridge.  However, efforts to place the bridge on the National Register of Historic Places have not come to fruition.

The bridge site is a popular tubing and kayaking launch point along the Rocky River. In 2005, the bridge was added to NCDOT's Historic Bridge Inventory.  Currently, plans to repair or replace the bridge are unknown.

https://www.cbs17.com/news/local-news/nc-bridge-abruptly-closed-after-deterioration-of-steel-found-in-one-hundred-and-four-year-old-chatham-county-structure/?fbclid=IwZXh0bgNhZW0CMTAAAR26qxi_BaJ3ZWE6okUxWAJTR2mKxPIsrReoXt6XW0RJRhAogN_ZeBvjEtc_aem_ASrHgObsdy0lLUQQLySnzqVjNQpfX8dJzEhi8SwkpzxijX03UATnhCwhTm7Ig1R-Epl1w9zULEdyLbrEyj6VZB5C

https://www.carolinaxroads.com/2024/05/104-year-old-chatham-county-bridge.html

fillup420

About a month ago, NC DOT announced that they would be changing traffic signal programming throughout the state to default to flashing red in all directions during signal issues (power outage, equipment failure, etc). I couldn't find anything yet posted about this decision, and I want to know yall's thoughts.

Personally, while i understand the motivation here is for the safest possible scenario, i don't think it is going to have the effect the NC DOT is anticipating.

There are many intersections where this should definitely be implemented. It is theoretically the safest option during signal issues. However, there are countless major intersections (Capital Blvd or Glenwood Ave come to mind), where traffic volume is consistently high enough that this will likely cause more chaos than it prevents.

Imagine trying to go from central Raleigh to RDU via Glenwood Ave, with every single stoplight as an all-way stop. Even during off-peak times, it would create an absolute slog, with every signalized intersection now a guessing game on who's turn it is to go from all the multi-lane sides.

That doesn't even take into account the drivers that will just ignore or misunderstand the new rules. Today i encountered this situation for the first time, at a medium sized intersection in Pinehurst (3-way, two through lanes each direction, with turn lanes). I saw 4 cars roll right through the flashing red, with one making no indication of stopping. The other three slowed down, then rolled on through.

So what do y'all think? Good idea or nah?

PColumbus73

Quote from: fillup420 on June 25, 2024, 07:32:28 PMAbout a month ago, NC DOT announced that they would be changing traffic signal programming throughout the state to default to flashing red in all directions during signal issues (power outage, equipment failure, etc). I couldn't find anything yet posted about this decision, and I want to know yall's thoughts.

Personally, while i understand the motivation here is for the safest possible scenario, i don't think it is going to have the effect the NC DOT is anticipating.

There are many intersections where this should definitely be implemented. It is theoretically the safest option during signal issues. However, there are countless major intersections (Capital Blvd or Glenwood Ave come to mind), where traffic volume is consistently high enough that this will likely cause more chaos than it prevents.

Imagine trying to go from central Raleigh to RDU via Glenwood Ave, with every single stoplight as an all-way stop. Even during off-peak times, it would create an absolute slog, with every signalized intersection now a guessing game on who's turn it is to go from all the multi-lane sides.

That doesn't even take into account the drivers that will just ignore or misunderstand the new rules. Today i encountered this situation for the first time, at a medium sized intersection in Pinehurst (3-way, two through lanes each direction, with turn lanes). I saw 4 cars roll right through the flashing red, with one making no indication of stopping. The other three slowed down, then rolled on through.

So what do y'all think? Good idea or nah?

I guess it can't be worse than a city-wide blackout when dark signals are supposed to be treated like all-way stops but seems to be a free-for-all, especially roads like Capital Blvd.

I wonder if the HAWK signals might be inadvertently training people that you can roll through a flashing red, or if this was has been happening before them?

sprjus4

Quote from: PColumbus73 on June 25, 2024, 08:02:05 PM
Quote from: fillup420 on June 25, 2024, 07:32:28 PMAbout a month ago, NC DOT announced that they would be changing traffic signal programming throughout the state to default to flashing red in all directions during signal issues (power outage, equipment failure, etc). I couldn't find anything yet posted about this decision, and I want to know yall's thoughts.

Personally, while i understand the motivation here is for the safest possible scenario, i don't think it is going to have the effect the NC DOT is anticipating.

There are many intersections where this should definitely be implemented. It is theoretically the safest option during signal issues. However, there are countless major intersections (Capital Blvd or Glenwood Ave come to mind), where traffic volume is consistently high enough that this will likely cause more chaos than it prevents.

Imagine trying to go from central Raleigh to RDU via Glenwood Ave, with every single stoplight as an all-way stop. Even during off-peak times, it would create an absolute slog, with every signalized intersection now a guessing game on who's turn it is to go from all the multi-lane sides.

That doesn't even take into account the drivers that will just ignore or misunderstand the new rules. Today i encountered this situation for the first time, at a medium sized intersection in Pinehurst (3-way, two through lanes each direction, with turn lanes). I saw 4 cars roll right through the flashing red, with one making no indication of stopping. The other three slowed down, then rolled on through.

So what do y'all think? Good idea or nah?

I guess it can't be worse than a city-wide blackout when dark signals are supposed to be treated like all-way stops but seems to be a free-for-all, especially roads like Capital Blvd.

I wonder if the HAWK signals might be inadvertently training people that you can roll through a flashing red, or if this was has been happening before them?
Technically, if a HAWK signal is flashing red, you are legally required to treat it as a stop sign.

VTGoose

Quote from: LM117 on May 31, 2024, 05:17:57 PMNC-751 in Durham between Kerley Road and Duke University Road has been named the "Coach K Highway".

Ew...


Will there be increased incidents of road rage on that section and pedestrians flopping on the roadside in hopes of getting insurance money?
"Get in the fast lane, grandma!  The bingo game is ready to roll!"

nerdom

Quote from: VTGoose on June 26, 2024, 08:54:04 AM
Quote from: LM117 on May 31, 2024, 05:17:57 PMNC-751 in Durham between Kerley Road and Duke University Road has been named the "Coach K Highway".

Ew...


Will there be increased incidents of road rage on that section and pedestrians flopping on the roadside in hopes of getting insurance money?


I can absolutely guarantee it. lol.

RoadPelican

On the flashing red signals, it's a good idea to have signs for awareness.

Kind of like "Left turn must yield on solid green" or "U-turn must yield to right turn"
These signs are only at some intersections, but should be at all.

The best solution is to hook up traffic signals to generators but I guess that would cost to much money.

I wonder if there has been a feasibility study on this?

These intersections have traffic lights for a reason!



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