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Author Topic: North Spokane Corridor - US 395 in Spokane, WA  (Read 16667 times)

MikieTimT

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Re: North Spokane Corridor - US 395 in Spokane, WA
« Reply #50 on: November 05, 2019, 09:34:44 AM »

That reminds me of a thread on Skyscraperpage forums about poverty moving from the cities to the suburbs. http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=240503

Not just a thread. Fairly well-documented situation at this point.

What's particularly worrying to many, is how many seniors live in suburban housing (having moved there in the 50s-80s). This leaves them very isolated and prone to injury, plus it forces their kids to drive all the way out to wherever they are, to take care of them.

With lifespans growing (for most US demographics) -- and the fact that a large number of these folks moved to the 'burbs in the pre-'73 years when gas was under a half-buck/gallon (and a 3-bedroom house outside coastal areas could be gotten for about $35-40K or less) -- the number of seniors "stuck" in the outlying areas will only increase.  If their residence is fully paid and amortized, fixed-income folks have little incentive to move to denser areas despite the relative lack of amenities, including health care, since housing near city cores (even in "secondary" cities such as Reno, Boise, and Spokane) is priced to reflect the proximity of amenities.   I suppose seniors (and technically I'm one of them!) in outlying areas would need to regularly assess their living and health situations and make provisions to accommodate their particular requirements while avoiding things that place them at risk as much as is feasible.  Even though I live in a dense area (and with a RN), those are considerations undertaken on a regular basis (she does nag me about lifting heavy objects, which I must occasionally do as part of my business, because I have a problematic knee: displaced cartilage, courtesy of a sports accident in my youth).   But I'm one of the lucky ones -- about to turn 70 with a decent portion of my health intact.   And I have no illusions about being taken care of by my offspring -- my only child, my daughter, lives in the West Village (NYC) and has never owned a car in her life!   

Bottom line -- there's not a lot that can be done about the distribution of the senior population -- and the general population of the suburbs largely mirrors that situation -- often the consideration of relocating to a denser area is thwarted by not only the prospect of trading space for convenience and/or safety, but also the likelihood that it might not be as simple as that equation -- the differences are arguably not linear in nature, with the more desirable neighborhoods affected in terms of price by ongoing gentrification -- so even finding anything affordable becomes a quixotic quest.  At this point, a real & viable solution has yet to emerge.     

The market will provide the solution.  As more of the population ages, or becomes less mobile in general since it appears that a good portion of the current generation coming of age isn't interested in driving, transportation solutions/agencies will progressively crop up in the currently under-served areas, or the services will adapt to go to them.  I basically run my IT consulting business out of my home and do most work onsite at the customer location as it was made clear to me 15 years ago by my first client that it didn't make sense for people to bring problem equipment to me to work on and hope they could communicate and replicate the issue after unhooking everything and delivering it, only to have to hopefully hook everything back up correctly and hope the problem was fixed.  This was even before the Geek Squad became a thing, but they haven't exactly cut into my business anyway.  I've worked on an awful lot of stuff they attempted to work on before they just gave up and recommended a new computer, which, conveniently, they also sold.  There's going to be a huge market for entrepreneurs who are willing to drive to where the client is since the population is aging and will be progressively less mobile, regardless of whether cars will drive themselves.  Quite frankly, I think we'll have self-flying VTOL transportation as drones scale up in size and weight capacity before we'll have effective self-driving vehicles, if they ever actually become capable of operating better that humans on anything other than a standardized freeway environment.
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Bobby5280

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Re: North Spokane Corridor - US 395 in Spokane, WA
« Reply #51 on: November 10, 2019, 12:19:18 AM »

I don't see us ever having flying cars. Regular people with crappy math skills and no pilot's license have zero business controlling any vehicle that is airborne. On top of that, Americans on average are so scatter-brained we can't concentrate on piloting such a craft anyway. Just look at all the mobile phone-related car accidents and other inattentive driving issues that take place on the roads. We don't need the same stupid business happening overhead at all.

I think California is a microcosm of what the future could hold for many other parts of the nation. Apple is headquartered there and we all know how other businesses like to copy Apple!

Anyway, the housing crisis in California just keeps getting worse. Over 40% of the state's population lives in a "housing stressed" condition where they're spending more than 1/3 of their income on rent or a mortgage. People in that group span from the lower income classes well up into the upper middle class segments. California has 10% of the nation's population but over 25% of the nation's homeless. More than 100,000 residents per year are leaving California for other locations. Texas gained over 80,000 new residents from California last year. 50,000 went to Washington state.

Certain people like to laugh and mock the term "income inequality" as if it's just some meaningless "snowflake" invention. But the money math is very very real. Runaway living cost inflation in most areas of California is setting that state up for economic ruin. Most real estate developers across the United States are fixated on building new homes for the well-off set.

But if a developer wanted to build new homes or apartments with pricing accessible to the burger-flipper class or school teachers it's 100% assured NIMBY groups, real estate developers and the ever-present cronyism in local politics would block the living hell out of such efforts. In California that situation is compounded by the mountains of regulatory red tape and fees to get any residential building effort going. Developers are literally forced to build only for the rich because that's the only kind of housing development that can generate any profit. In the end GREEDY RESIDENTS do not want a larger supply of housing. They don't want the risk of their own properties losing any value/equity.

So it's looking more like a "when" and not "if" for a population exodus and employment apocalypse to happen. And then that will bring California's housing prices back down to reality in a crash. Here's how absurd the situation has become in California: in August the city of San Mateo approved a plan to convert an old Fire Station into barracks for its police officers. Why did they do that? Because a bunch of their police officers where effectively homeless. They were sleeping in their cars between shifts because they couldn't afford any housing anywhere in the vicinity.

Very few of the hundreds of thousands of people leaving California are moving to small town and rural areas where the cost of living is relatively cheap. They're mostly moving to other large cities where the bubble economy has not yet got out of hand. But issues like housing affordability are already growing problems in booming cities of Texas, Colorado, Arizona, Idaho and some other odd places -like North Dakota. Oil field workers in the Bakken Shale have a tough time finding any place affordable to rent/own.

The United States has such extremes in place that we are setting the stage for even worse long term, down-ward development than what Japan is now suffering. Once you're a grown adult 20 years can pass by pretty quick. So I'm seeing age 70 and my own Social Security Situation as something visible on the horizon. What I see ahead for America is a very ugly future. We may end up being a weak, broke nation mostly populated mostly with old farts -just dying to be invaded by another world power.
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Re: North Spokane Corridor - US 395 in Spokane, WA
« Reply #52 on: November 10, 2019, 11:28:00 PM »

I don't see us ever having flying cars. Regular people with crappy math skills and no pilot's license have zero business controlling any vehicle that is airborne. On top of that, Americans on average are so scatter-brained we can't concentrate on piloting such a craft anyway. Just look at all the mobile phone-related car accidents and other inattentive driving issues that take place on the roads. We don't need the same stupid business happening overhead at all.

I think California is a microcosm of what the future could hold for many other parts of the nation. Apple is headquartered there and we all know how other businesses like to copy Apple!

Anyway, the housing crisis in California just keeps getting worse. Over 40% of the state's population lives in a "housing stressed" condition where they're spending more than 1/3 of their income on rent or a mortgage. People in that group span from the lower income classes well up into the upper middle class segments. California has 10% of the nation's population but over 25% of the nation's homeless. More than 100,000 residents per year are leaving California for other locations. Texas gained over 80,000 new residents from California last year. 50,000 went to Washington state.

Certain people like to laugh and mock the term "income inequality" as if it's just some meaningless "snowflake" invention. But the money math is very very real. Runaway living cost inflation in most areas of California is setting that state up for economic ruin. Most real estate developers across the United States are fixated on building new homes for the well-off set.

But if a developer wanted to build new homes or apartments with pricing accessible to the burger-flipper class or school teachers it's 100% assured NIMBY groups, real estate developers and the ever-present cronyism in local politics would block the living hell out of such efforts. In California that situation is compounded by the mountains of regulatory red tape and fees to get any residential building effort going. Developers are literally forced to build only for the rich because that's the only kind of housing development that can generate any profit. In the end GREEDY RESIDENTS do not want a larger supply of housing. They don't want the risk of their own properties losing any value/equity.

So it's looking more like a "when" and not "if" for a population exodus and employment apocalypse to happen. And then that will bring California's housing prices back down to reality in a crash. Here's how absurd the situation has become in California: in August the city of San Mateo approved a plan to convert an old Fire Station into barracks for its police officers. Why did they do that? Because a bunch of their police officers where effectively homeless. They were sleeping in their cars between shifts because they couldn't afford any housing anywhere in the vicinity.

Very few of the hundreds of thousands of people leaving California are moving to small town and rural areas where the cost of living is relatively cheap. They're mostly moving to other large cities where the bubble economy has not yet got out of hand. But issues like housing affordability are already growing problems in booming cities of Texas, Colorado, Arizona, Idaho and some other odd places -like North Dakota. Oil field workers in the Bakken Shale have a tough time finding any place affordable to rent/own.

The United States has such extremes in place that we are setting the stage for even worse long term, down-ward development than what Japan is now suffering. Once you're a grown adult 20 years can pass by pretty quick. So I'm seeing age 70 and my own Social Security Situation as something visible on the horizon. What I see ahead for America is a very ugly future. We may end up being a weak, broke nation mostly populated mostly with old farts -just dying to be invaded by another world power.
This thread is about the North Spokane Corridor. Please return to topic.

 


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