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Author Topic: West Virginia  (Read 4307 times)

logan230

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West Virginia
« on: October 16, 2014, 05:42:37 PM »

There's a Delaware topic, a VA topic, MD, DC. Not West Virginia.
Here you go.
Post whatever you want that's related to the Eastern Panhandle.
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cpzilliacus

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2014, 05:59:06 PM »

Post whatever you want that's related to the Eastern Panhandle.

We have gone well beyond the Eastern Panhandle counties in the Mid-Atlantic forum, notably in discussing ADHS Corridor H. 
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seicer

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 03:59:36 PM »

This might be going a bit high. 65 MPH-70 MPH is fine for four-lanes and corridor routes, and 70 MPH is fine for interstates. I can see 75 MPH on certain segments, like I-64 east of Beckley, but for I-64 near Huntington? No. The bill would also not allow for 80 MPH speeds in cities, so you can scratch higher speeds inside Huntington, Charleston, Martinsburg, et. al.

http://www.wsaz.com/content/news/Proposed-bill-would-raise--468637773.html

"A bill introduced in the W.Va. Senate aims raise the speed limit on the interstate and four-lane highways."
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hbelkins

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 04:15:02 PM »

This might be going a bit high. 65 MPH-70 MPH is fine for four-lanes and corridor routes, and 70 MPH is fine for interstates. I can see 75 MPH on certain segments, like I-64 east of Beckley, but for I-64 near Huntington? No. The bill would also not allow for 80 MPH speeds in cities, so you can scratch higher speeds inside Huntington, Charleston, Martinsburg, et. al.

http://www.wsaz.com/content/news/Proposed-bill-would-raise--468637773.html

"A bill introduced in the W.Va. Senate aims raise the speed limit on the interstate and four-lane highways."

Traffic already moves around 80 mph between about Barboursville and St. Albans. It's not uncommon for me to look at the speedometer somewhere between Mall Road and Milton and see I'm going 85 mph, and still getting passed right and left.
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TheOneKEA

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2018, 09:21:15 AM »

I-81’s twin bridges are currently being rebuilt/rehabbed by MDOT SHA. Will WVDOT be making any changes to I-81 between US 11 and the Potomac after this project is completed?
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froggie

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2018, 12:02:41 PM »

^ Yes.  Besides being a full bridge replacement project, it will widen 81 to 6 lanes from MD 63/68 down to the existing 6-lane section in West Virginia at Exit 23.
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Revive 755

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2018, 12:27:19 PM »

http://www.wsaz.com/content/news/Proposed-bill-would-raise--468637773.html

"A bill introduced in the W.Va. Senate aims raise the speed limit on the interstate and four-lane highways."

IMHO the bill needs to be rewritten since it does not allow an 80 mph zone that would "pass through the city limits of municipalities."  Granted I am not familiar with how local governments operate in West Virginia, but elsewhere they have a habit of annexing along the highway even if there are no interchanges.  The restriction would lead to speed limits not matching what the road could handle, and possibly new speed trap opportunities.

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Bitmapped

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2018, 03:16:26 PM »

SB 96, the 80mph bill, isn't going anywhere. It was introduced last year as SB 627 and never left committee.

Much of WV's Interstate and Corridor network was built with a 65mph design speed. WVDOH has to get design exceptions from FHWA on projects now to keep the 70mph speed limit, as justified by low accident rates. I can't see FHWA granting design exceptions with an 80mph speed limit.

FWIW, the Commissioner of Highways has the ability to set speed limits now with no maximum limit in state code.
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froggie

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2018, 01:28:16 PM »

Quote from: Bitmapped
FWIW, the Commissioner of Highways has the ability to set speed limits now with no maximum limit in state code.

But I imagine would be highly unlikely to approve an 80 MPH speed limit on a roadway with a 65 MPH design speed...
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cpzilliacus

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2018, 02:31:27 PM »

But I imagine would be highly unlikely to approve an 80 MPH speed limit on a roadway with a 65 MPH design speed...

Agreed.  It might also be engineering malpractice to post a limit that much above the design speed (I also have to wonder if a licensed professional engineer would want to stamp something like that - if an engineer's stamp is required).

I am personally fine with posting a limit up to (but not above) the design speed (but I am not a P.E.).

Beyond all of that, there's a fair amount of out-of-state traffic on many West Virginia Interstate highways, and at least some of those out-of-state drivers are not familiar with the twists and turns of Mountaineer State freeways, which  might increase crash risks.
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tckma

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2018, 02:55:44 PM »

I-81’s twin bridges are currently being rebuilt/rehabbed by MDOT SHA. Will WVDOT be making any changes to I-81 between US 11 and the Potomac after this project is completed?

I happened to drive on that part of I-81 rather early this morning doing property and business inspections for my second job.  There is active construction work (read: I saw workers wearing hard hats and reflective vests walking and chatting) present on both the Maryland and West Virginia sides of the Potomac leading up to the new metal girders that Maryland SHA, excuse me, Maryland MDOT SHA, have put up for a replacement bridge.  The new construction seems to go WAY too far into WV for it to be all led by Maryland MDOT SHA.  I can't remember if the new pavement went past the US-11 exit.  Construction certainly stops before the WV-901 exit.

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2018, 04:52:47 PM »

I can't remember if the new pavement went past the US-11 exit.  Construction certainly stops before the WV-901 exit.

No, I-81 is already 6 lanes south of there from US 11 (Exit 23) to WV 45 (Exit 12).  The new construction there will extend that 6-lane section into Maryland.
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Bitmapped

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2018, 11:12:55 PM »

I-81’s twin bridges are currently being rebuilt/rehabbed by MDOT SHA. Will WVDOT be making any changes to I-81 between US 11 and the Potomac after this project is completed?

I happened to drive on that part of I-81 rather early this morning doing property and business inspections for my second job.  There is active construction work (read: I saw workers wearing hard hats and reflective vests walking and chatting) present on both the Maryland and West Virginia sides of the Potomac leading up to the new metal girders that Maryland SHA, excuse me, Maryland MDOT SHA, have put up for a replacement bridge.  The new construction seems to go WAY too far into WV for it to be all led by Maryland MDOT SHA.  I can't remember if the new pavement went past the US-11 exit.  Construction certainly stops before the WV-901 exit.

MDSHA is handling the entire project, including the WV sections up to the current end of the 6-lane segment at US 11. WVDOH is reimbursing Maryland for its expenses in West Virginia.
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SP Cook

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2018, 10:37:12 AM »


Beyond all of that, there's a fair amount of out-of-state traffic on many West Virginia Interstate highways, and at least some of those out-of-state drivers are not familiar with the twists and turns of Mountaineer State freeways, which  might increase crash risks.

Mountain State.  Anyway, leaving aside the design malpractice that is the northern third of the WV Turnpike, the same sorts of thing was said when the SL went from 55 to 65 and then from 65 to 70.  And the sayers were dead wrong.  They are again.  Average speeds on the rural parts of WV's lightly traveled interstates could easily be 80 or more, and an increase in the SL (and a removal of traffic lights) on the ARC system is needed even more so.
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cpzilliacus

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2018, 11:35:22 AM »

Average speeds on the rural parts of WV's lightly traveled interstates could easily be 80 or more, and an increase in the SL (and a removal of traffic lights) on the ARC system is needed even more so.

Would love to see the signals on Corridor H at WV-92 (just west of Elkins) and at U.S. 250 (where it leaves Corridor H to head north toward Philippi) removed.
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tckma

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #15 on: January 27, 2018, 07:44:17 PM »

I was driving in WV this morning (on WV 45 from the MD state line toward Martinsburg), and I saw some new route shields I'd never seen before -- they were like your weird fractional county routes, but in a "home plate" shaped shield.

I can't find an example in GMSV, but the imagery along WV45 is several years old.

What is this?

Alps

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2018, 09:05:41 PM »

I was driving in WV this morning (on WV 45 from the MD state line toward Martinsburg), and I saw some new route shields I'd never seen before -- they were like your weird fractional county routes, but in a "home plate" shaped shield.

I can't find an example in GMSV, but the imagery along WV45 is several years old.

What is this?
"Driveway routes" - they're so small they're not even secondary or tertiary (triangle - yes there are more shapes) routes. Basically they feed a few homes and that's it. The most basic possible maintenance, but still state maintained.

hbelkins

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2018, 10:45:20 PM »

Yes, they're called HARP routes -- Home Access Road Program. SP Cook can give a better definition of their history, but basically they are roads that serve two or more homes that otherwise may not have been in the public maintenance fold. Now they are.
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SP Cook

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #18 on: January 28, 2018, 10:31:30 AM »

HARP.  Home Access Road Program.  Political program of late Gov. Underwood (97-01).  WV has a long history of "orphan roads" which are just roads that developed to serve housing and commerce, built by the community, or the coal companies, or whatever.  Had been a serious political issue for a long time.  This was Underwood's answer. 

Program was abused to some degree.  Pretty much the state would give you a sign and a promise to perfom "as is maintance" if the neighbors would all sign a petition.  Lots of "roads" that were really just driveways, and lots of much more modern suburban tract housing streets were taken in.  State make no legal claim to real estate ownership. 

Next governor cancelled the program on day one. 

The symbol is supposed to by a house, think the little houses in Monopoly.  The proper way to index such a road is "County HARP #".  Numbering system is seperate from the regular County numbers.  Some counties used the unique to WV "fractional" system, some did not.


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tckma

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2018, 10:28:43 PM »

Interesting.  So, these were basically political favors to very small neighborhoods, just to give their driveway a route number?

SP Cook

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2018, 09:16:08 AM »

Interesting.  So, these were basically political favors to very small neighborhoods, just to give their driveway a route number?

Pretty much.  The long answer is that, unique to the coal producing area of Appalachia, mostly WV and eastern KY, there is the issue of so-called "orphan roads".   These are just roads that just developed in rural areas, built by the coal or gas companies, or just built over time by settlers, or whatever. 

Lots of these became "county routes" in the 1960s, following a federal raid on abusive DOH practices, but that still left lots of people living on roads that did not show up on the map, so to speak.  No legal way to maintain, as the DOT cannot spend money off the system.  Leads to lots of issues (safety, who can drive there, school buses, ambulance/911, lots of things).  Issue for many years.  Underwood's idea was this HARP thing.  The intention was good.  He was talking about legitimate roads in rural areas that served a community. 

Problem was it got abused in two ways.  Lots of people, literally, got their driveway in the sytem (often named for themselves, BTW, I could have lived on Cook Road) and, in the more normal part of the state, lots of suburban tract housing became HARP roads.  This was really just a sign, so NBD.  But the main abuse, and it continues to this day, is now all of these HARP roads are in the state system and while the long ago promise was "as is maintainance", that is undefined, and if you know the right pol, you can get your driveway or your entire suburban tract housing development, paved.

Which, of course, takes money away from actual through highways.

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TheOneKEA

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #21 on: May 04, 2018, 07:19:53 PM »

I-81’s twin bridges are currently being rebuilt/rehabbed by MDOT SHA. Will WVDOT be making any changes to I-81 between US 11 and the Potomac after this project is completed?

I happened to drive on that part of I-81 rather early this morning doing property and business inspections for my second job.  There is active construction work (read: I saw workers wearing hard hats and reflective vests walking and chatting) present on both the Maryland and West Virginia sides of the Potomac leading up to the new metal girders that Maryland SHA, excuse me, Maryland MDOT SHA, have put up for a replacement bridge.  The new construction seems to go WAY too far into WV for it to be all led by Maryland MDOT SHA.  I can't remember if the new pavement went past the US-11 exit.  Construction certainly stops before the WV-901 exit.

MDSHA is handling the entire project, including the WV sections up to the current end of the 6-lane segment at US 11. WVDOH is reimbursing Maryland for its expenses in West Virginia.

I checked the Web page for this project and observed this photo of the median barrier work in West Virginia on I-81. This made me wonder about the partnership between MDOT SHA and WVDOT - did the latter contribute any design work for the widening of I-81, to match the design and character of the existing widening work? Or was it designed solely by the SHA, on WVDOT’s dime, and the latter only provided oversight?
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Bitmapped

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #22 on: May 04, 2018, 09:33:33 PM »

I-81’s twin bridges are currently being rebuilt/rehabbed by MDOT SHA. Will WVDOT be making any changes to I-81 between US 11 and the Potomac after this project is completed?

I happened to drive on that part of I-81 rather early this morning doing property and business inspections for my second job.  There is active construction work (read: I saw workers wearing hard hats and reflective vests walking and chatting) present on both the Maryland and West Virginia sides of the Potomac leading up to the new metal girders that Maryland SHA, excuse me, Maryland MDOT SHA, have put up for a replacement bridge.  The new construction seems to go WAY too far into WV for it to be all led by Maryland MDOT SHA.  I can't remember if the new pavement went past the US-11 exit.  Construction certainly stops before the WV-901 exit.

MDSHA is handling the entire project, including the WV sections up to the current end of the 6-lane segment at US 11. WVDOH is reimbursing Maryland for its expenses in West Virginia.

I checked the Web page for this project and observed this photo of the median barrier work in West Virginia on I-81. This made me wonder about the partnership between MDOT SHA and WVDOT - did the latter contribute any design work for the widening of I-81, to match the design and character of the existing widening work? Or was it designed solely by the SHA, on WVDOT’s dime, and the latter only provided oversight?

WVDOH is pretty short-staffed on engineers. Even if WV was managing this project, the design for something of this scope would have been contracted out.
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sprjus4

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Re: West Virginia
« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2019, 07:59:48 AM »

http://www.theintelligencer.net/news/community/2019/03/bill-in-the-west-virginia-legislature-would-allow-west-virginia-department-of-transportation-to-increase-speed-limits-to-75-mph-changes-on-interstate-70-unlikely/

"The speed limit on selected interstate highways in West Virginia could be raised under a measure before the Legislature.

However, this isn’t likely to speed things up on Interstate 70 in Ohio County, said Sen. Charles Clements, chairman of Senate Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

House Concurrent Resolution 32 would give secretary of the State Department of Transportation raise highway speed limits, “where appropriate,” to 75 mph on interstate highways in West Virginia.

“This is only permissive, not mandatory” said Clements, R-Wetzel. “It does not require it to be done. (The secretary) is authorized to look into it.”

He doesn’t foresee a decision coming to raise the speed limit to 75 mph on I-70.

“I doubt it. It’s pretty congested,” Clements said. “They want it down to 60-65 mph coming down Two-Mile Hill. I don’t think so.”

HCR 32 passed the Senate Monday containing an amendment made in the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. Members eliminated a provision that also would have given the secretary of the State Department of Transportation authority to raise speed limits on the Appalachian Corridor highways to 70 mph.

“It was removed because there are crossings there that are pretty dangerous,” Clements said. “It’s like that in a lot of places.”

The House accepted changes to the legislation Wednesday evening, and HCR 32 is now on to Gov. Jim Justice for signature."
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