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Author Topic: Arizona  (Read 12332 times)

Tom958

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Re: Arizona
« Reply #50 on: June 02, 2020, 11:58:35 PM »

BTW: I don't think calling these "AASHTO beams" is the best terminology. AASHTO may have some minimum design standards for roadways, but I don't think they delve into the minutia of bridge design (particularly for what appear to be pre-cast concrete girders).

My understanding is that AASHTO indeed sponsors a range of standard designs for precast beams. I first learned about this in the early '80's from my girlfriend, who was working as a drafter for a well-known engineering company. The reason for doing so is obvious: it simplifies both design and procurement. it's a good thing that the replacement spans for the William T. Sherman Viaduct in Atlanta were AASHTO beams that could essentially be ordered from a catalog as opposed to being refabricated from an archived agency-specific design.

That said, I made a mistake in calling them AASHTO beams. When I first stumbled upon this, I couldn't pull up the archived Streetviews, and I assumed that the bridge was new, in which case the beams would likely have been AASHTO beams. I never found the bridgereports.com entry, so I eventually decided that it must've been built at the same time as the shortcut segment of I-40, in the mid '70's. AASHTO beams may or may not have been a thing at that point in history.

Also, the Streetview I posted was from 2011, showing the bridge in its finished state. The construction view is more current, from 2019

That construction shot looks like they did a complete deck replacement and replaced the side railing/walls. Which would explain the framework under the main span but not the sides.

Indeed. I discovered this while checking out I-40 across Arizona for a not-too-successful Facebook post. In doing so, I discovered mid '60's bridges that are on their third parapet.  :-o
« Last Edit: June 03, 2020, 12:04:05 AM by Tom958 »
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ethanhopkin14

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Re: Arizona
« Reply #51 on: July 14, 2020, 06:27:45 PM »

I am a Texas who loves the Grand Canyon State.  The first time I visited was in 2001, and I was blown away at how good the roads, still think they were the best I have seen outside my own state (Texans think we have excellent roads, which we do have some of the best, but I honestly don't think that's saying too much [you're the hottest waitress at Denys]).  I don't get to visit as much as I would like, so there are gaps between visits, but it does seem that each time I have visited Arizona, the road quality deteriorates with normal aging, almost like the first time I went to Arizona was after a recent state wide revamping of the infrastructure.  Almost like the roads now 20 years old.  Not bad, just old.  Was there a state wide revamping that happened around the turn of the century?
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Sonic99

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Re: Arizona
« Reply #52 on: July 15, 2020, 02:43:22 AM »

I am a Texas who loves the Grand Canyon State.  The first time I visited was in 2001, and I was blown away at how good the roads, still think they were the best I have seen outside my own state (Texans think we have excellent roads, which we do have some of the best, but I honestly don't think that's saying too much [you're the hottest waitress at Denys]).  I don't get to visit as much as I would like, so there are gaps between visits, but it does seem that each time I have visited Arizona, the road quality deteriorates with normal aging, almost like the first time I went to Arizona was after a recent state wide revamping of the infrastructure.  Almost like the roads now 20 years old.  Not bad, just old.  Was there a state wide revamping that happened around the turn of the century?

The 90's through about 2006 saw an absolutely massive amount of overhaul and upgrade to a lot of the highways. The population was expanding significantly, so ADOT was constantly widening and reconstructing roads, building new roads, etc. For Phoenix metro, 1990 to 2002 saw all of the loop freeways go from a few very small sections to near-full completion except the 202 in the East Valley. There was a ton of work going all around the state to try to keep up with the growth.
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If you used to draw freeways on your homework and got reprimanded by your Senior English teacher for doing so, you might be a road geek!

ethanhopkin14

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Re: Arizona
« Reply #53 on: July 15, 2020, 01:21:13 PM »

I am a Texas who loves the Grand Canyon State.  The first time I visited was in 2001, and I was blown away at how good the roads, still think they were the best I have seen outside my own state (Texans think we have excellent roads, which we do have some of the best, but I honestly don't think that's saying too much [you're the hottest waitress at Denys]).  I don't get to visit as much as I would like, so there are gaps between visits, but it does seem that each time I have visited Arizona, the road quality deteriorates with normal aging, almost like the first time I went to Arizona was after a recent state wide revamping of the infrastructure.  Almost like the roads now 20 years old.  Not bad, just old.  Was there a state wide revamping that happened around the turn of the century?

The 90's through about 2006 saw an absolutely massive amount of overhaul and upgrade to a lot of the highways. The population was expanding significantly, so ADOT was constantly widening and reconstructing roads, building new roads, etc. For Phoenix metro, 1990 to 2002 saw all of the loop freeways go from a few very small sections to near-full completion except the 202 in the East Valley. There was a ton of work going all around the state to try to keep up with the growth.

Makes sense.  I always thought it might have been new growth combined with the arrival of the Arizona Diamondbacks in 1998.  It's not unheard of for a major sporting event or new sports team to spawn a major infrastructure overhaul, as goofy as it sounds.  People will now come to see your new team, look at our fantastic roads.
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Pink Jazz

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Re: Arizona
« Reply #54 on: November 02, 2020, 03:49:21 PM »

Going to the subject of dynamic message signs, ADOT's contract with Daktronics expires in November 2021.

I wonder if ADOT will give Skyline a second chance.  I know there was that issue of random disconnects from the network possibly due to a compatibility issue with the Cameleon control software, but perhaps Skyline might be planning a fix for the next bid.  Considering other states don't have the same issues with their Skyline DMS (including loyal customer CDOT), it was probably something inherent to ADOT's setup that was causing the issue.

I can see SES America making a bid as well considering they have done several retrofit projects for ADOT.  There is also Adaptive, although they might be a longshot.

In truth, ADOT should not let its DMS control software be a bottleneck, since ADOT's Cameleon control software currently doesn't support graphics nor colors, even though ADOT currently specifies color full matrix DMS for its newest installs.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2020, 04:08:01 PM by Pink Jazz »
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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Arizona
« Reply #55 on: November 10, 2020, 03:47:44 PM »

I swear there was a thread on the Broadway curve but I can’t find it. Anyway a preferred contractor has been selected this project is moving forward.

https://www.ttnews.com/articles/arizona-dot-names-preferred-developer-i-10-project-phoenix-area
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andy3175

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Re: Arizona
« Reply #56 on: November 20, 2020, 04:32:05 PM »

Article on Phoenix Interstates from the Arizona Republic:

https://amp.azcentral.com/amp/3595374001

Quote
The 1956 act created interstates 10 and 17 in metro Phoenix. Interstate 17 is a north-south highway connecting Phoenix to northern cities like Prescott and Flagstaff. I-10 is Phoenix’s east-west interstate that bends south starting at 20th Street to connect Phoenix to Tucson.

In original proposed routes, federal highway planners wanted I-10 to intersect I-17 at Durango Street in south Phoenix. But Arizona officials, backed by Sen. Carl Hayden, argued for an alignment farther north, which would cross more populated areas and, they said, serve local traffic as well as cross-country travelers.

“I am pleased that the Bureau of Public Roads has consented to this change that will mean so much to Arizona, the City of Phoenix, and to the surrounding communities of Goodyear and Litchfield,” Sen. Hayden said in 1965.

That northward shift would require I-10 to pass through predominantly white neighborhoods near downtown. Residents of the area revolted and spoke fiercely in opposition to the proposed path. 

The city listened, and in 1973, returned to voters with a new plan: a highway that reached 100 feet in the sky, called a helicoil. Again, voters organized in opposition. ...

In 1973, voters struck the helicoil design down.

By 1979, the city found success. What’s commonly referred to today as “the Deck Park Tunnel,” an underground highway beneath a grass park connecting the downtown neighborhoods, was accepted by voters. Construction began in 1983 and the Papago Freeway opened in 1990. ...

When infrastructure was routed through other neighborhoods, such as I-17 bisecting neighborhoods south of downtown Phoenix and I-10 demolishing neighborhoods along 20th street, the predominantly Black and Latino residents had no such sway.

In May 1963, an expanded portion of Interstate 17 that penetrated south Phoenix neighborhoods and bent east at Durango Street opened. The Durango Curve bordered the southwest edge of a historic Black neighborhood, referred to as the “west region” in a City of Phoenix report documenting historic Black properties, and Duarte’s barrio, La Sonorita.   ...

The area’s lack of representation proved useful for highway planners when the designs of Interstate 10 through Roosevelt were in flux. Amid uncertainty with the future of the Papago Freeway and facing pressure to finish connecting Phoenix to Tucson, highway planners decided to build out I-17’s Durango Curve.

The new portion would connect to I-10’s Broadway Curve, the location at which I-10 becomes a north-south extending highway at 52nd street. It would be called the Maricopa Freeway. In 1971 it opened, cutting a second wound through south Phoenix. ...

"Interstate 17 was placed directly across Latino neighborhoods of South Phoenix paralleling the historic rail corridor,” (a 2005 ASU study on chronic environmental inequities) said. “The resultant high levels of highway traffic contribute to substantial ambient air pollution in this zone today.”
 
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