AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Qhapaq Nan World Heritage Road System  (Read 1863 times)

Grzrd

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3418
  • Interested Observer

  • Location: Atlanta, GA
  • Last Login: November 16, 2018, 08:24:13 PM
Qhapaq Nan World Heritage Road System
« on: July 19, 2015, 06:28:55 PM »

Note - even though it is not a "highway" system, I have posted in this board because the Incan Qhapaq Nan road system is an international road system.

After reading that the Alamo was recently granted World Heritage status, I began to wonder if any roads are World Heritage sites.  Just last year, the Qhapaq Nan road system was granted World Heritage status, as reported by the BBC on June 21, 2014:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-27958466

Quote
A road system built by the Inca Empire has been granted World Heritage status by the United Nations cultural agency, Unesco.
The Qhapaq Nan roads go through six South American countries.
It was built in the most diverse terrains, linking communities in the Andes mountains to fertile valleys, rainforests and deserts.
Unesco described the system as an engineering wonder that must be restored and preserved ....
It covers some 30,000 km (18,600 miles), from modern-day Colombia in the north to Argentina and Chile in the south, via Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia.
Parts of it are still preserved, but most of the route has deteriorated since the Inca Empire was defeated.
"We still cannot see the entire road because a large part of it is covered by vegetation
," said Fernando Astete, chief archaeologist at Peru's Machu Picchu site told AFP news agency.
The route system used to link the Inca capital, Cusco, to distant areas of the empire.
"The Qhapaq Nan by its sheer scale and quality of the road is a unique achievement of engineering skills. It demonstrates mastery in engineering technology," Unesco said in a statement.
Unesco says that granting the Qhapaq Nan roads World Heritage status will make them eligible for much-needed restoration funds.

At least one trekking service provides tours on parts of it in Peru:

https://www.chaskatours.com/trekking-and-hiking-peru

Has anyone in the Forum trekked part of it?

If someone posted about the designation last year, then I simply missed it.
Logged

SignGeek101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1866
  • Winnipeg sign geek and civil engineering student.

  • Age: 22
  • Location: Winnipeg
  • Last Login: July 19, 2018, 09:05:19 PM
Re: Qhapaq Nan World Heritage Road System
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2015, 06:34:00 PM »

I wonder what civilizations hundreds / thousands of years from now will think of our highway systems.

30 000 km is a long walk for clinching  ;-)

J N Winkler

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6064
  • Location: Wichita, Kansas/Oxford, Great Britain
  • Last Login: Today at 01:13:53 AM
Re: Qhapaq Nan World Heritage Road System
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2015, 09:50:37 PM »

After reading that the Alamo was recently granted World Heritage status, I began to wonder if any roads are World Heritage sites.

The Camino de Santiago (a fixture on my personal bucket list) is one example, and I suspect there are others.
Logged
"It is necessary to spend a hundred lire now to save a thousand lire later."--Piero Puricelli, explaining the need for a first-class road system to Benito Mussolini

english si

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3368
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Buckinghamshire, England
  • Last Login: December 10, 2018, 02:22:15 PM
Re: Qhapaq Nan World Heritage Road System
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2015, 04:45:29 AM »

After reading that the Alamo was recently granted World Heritage status, I began to wonder if any roads are World Heritage sites.
Ironbridge - not that you can drive it now (and it's the whole gorge, rather than just the bridge), nor was it particularly designed for heavy traffic.

Wales has the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Scotland the Forth (rail) Bridge as World Heritage Sites. I'm highly surprised that none of the Menai Bridge, Clifton Suspension Bridge, Tower Bridge, Newport Transporter Bridge, or similar are even on the UK's waitlist for World Heritage Status. Then again, save the Aqueduct of Padre Tembleque and the Pont du Gard there's not any other bridges. Also, the committee has made it clear that they aren't big fans of bridges.

There's the Silk Road, but rather than the road itself, like El Calmio Real de Tierra, (but not like Qhapaq Nan or Camino de Santiago), it's just sites and cities along the route, rather than the actual route.
Logged

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.