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Author Topic: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom  (Read 111616 times)

bing101

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dvferyance

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1051 on: October 09, 2019, 10:52:56 PM »

Here is an interesting one. You can get the New York AM radio stations from the Outer Banks of NC.

On a somewhat related note, radio stations can be received on opposite sides of the Great Lakes. For example, stations in eastern Wisconsin can be heard on Michigan's west coast and vice versa
Are you talking about at night?  Or during the day?
During the day according to radio locator WFAN is a station you can get from the Outer Banks due to it's weird signal pattern the outer banks are just east enough to be in it' fringe area over the Atlantic.
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J3ebrules

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1052 on: October 10, 2019, 12:34:47 AM »

These two schools share a campus that straddles the King-Snohomish county line. Part of the same district, though.

Local campus of State University has portions in 3 adjacent municipalities. So 911 dispatch has some deciphering to do when they get a call.
And in order to "represent student population better"  city voting was gerrymandered with districts going across the campus. So dorm students have to provide their building and room number - and in some cases location of their bed within the room - for voting purposes.

Wait... since when do students vote based on where their dorms are? At my college, we weren’t city residents; we voted on absentee ballot where our parents lived. Can’t be different for high school boarding schools...
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english si

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1053 on: October 10, 2019, 04:59:57 AM »

Wait... since when do students vote based on where their dorms are? At my college, we weren’t city residents
My uni hall of residence registered us all (presumably, but probably not, paying attention to citizenships and seeing who was eligible for specific votes*) to vote with that as our address. We could also vote postal vote for back home if we were registered there. We had a choice of where to vote (and for local elections we possibly could have voted in two places - home and uni).

At one point there were three students on the city council, and a few more who had stood. Though only one was living in college dorms (to use the US term), as 2nd years and above tended to rent private rental housing, rather than live with the uni as the landlord.

Of course, this was the UK. The US may vary...

*Depending on the election, different sets of resident aliens (to use the US term) could vote. Not that they check - some London Boroughs don't differentiate between the different eligibilities and put ineligible residents on the roll for some elections because they are able to vote in others - and no one really cares much.
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cabiness42

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1054 on: October 10, 2019, 07:40:01 AM »

These two schools share a campus that straddles the King-Snohomish county line. Part of the same district, though.

Local campus of State University has portions in 3 adjacent municipalities. So 911 dispatch has some deciphering to do when they get a call.
And in order to "represent student population better"  city voting was gerrymandered with districts going across the campus. So dorm students have to provide their building and room number - and in some cases location of their bed within the room - for voting purposes.

Wait... since when do students vote based on where their dorms are? At my college, we weren’t city residents; we voted on absentee ballot where our parents lived. Can’t be different for high school boarding schools...

You can choose to move your voter registration address to your college residence or keep it at home. 
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jeffandnicole

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1055 on: October 10, 2019, 08:00:24 AM »

These two schools share a campus that straddles the King-Snohomish county line. Part of the same district, though.

Local campus of State University has portions in 3 adjacent municipalities. So 911 dispatch has some deciphering to do when they get a call.
And in order to "represent student population better"  city voting was gerrymandered with districts going across the campus. So dorm students have to provide their building and room number - and in some cases location of their bed within the room - for voting purposes.

Wait... since when do students vote based on where their dorms are? At my college, we weren’t city residents; we voted on absentee ballot where our parents lived. Can’t be different for high school boarding schools...

You can choose to move your voter registration address to your college residence or keep it at home. 

In addition, some students (especially international students) live on campus year-round.  Many schools will keep one residence hall open for these people.
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empirestate

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1056 on: October 10, 2019, 11:32:28 AM »

Wait... since when do students vote based on where their dorms are? At my college, we weren’t city residents; we voted on absentee ballot where our parents lived. Can’t be different for high school boarding schools...

Since at least 1994 (and probably a lot longer). When I cast my first vote, it was at my on-campus polling place in NYC, not at home in Rochester.
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J3ebrules

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1057 on: October 10, 2019, 04:22:31 PM »

That’s so odd to me, especially since I went to a state school where residency was established by where your parents lived. Otherwise, I could have just moved into the dorm for a year and said, “oh, hey, I’m a NJ resident now!” (My family was living in PA at the time).
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Mark68

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1058 on: October 10, 2019, 04:41:55 PM »

That’s so odd to me, especially since I went to a state school where residency was established by where your parents lived. Otherwise, I could have just moved into the dorm for a year and said, “oh, hey, I’m a NJ resident now!” (My family was living in PA at the time).

Actually, that's part of what I do for a living--answer students' questions about residency. Not sure how it works in NJ, but in CO, residency IS based on your parents' residence (by state law) and you are considered a dependent student until you turn 23. So even if you register to vote in CO (and work here, register your motor vehicle here, have a lease agreement, etc), you are still a dependent until 23.
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hbelkins

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1059 on: October 11, 2019, 07:01:18 PM »

Wait... since when do students vote based on where their dorms are? At my college, we weren’t city residents; we voted on absentee ballot where our parents lived. Can’t be different for high school boarding schools...

Since at least 1994 (and probably a lot longer). When I cast my first vote, it was at my on-campus polling place in NYC, not at home in Rochester.

I always voted absentee until one election, in 1982 or 83, when I changed my registration to Rowan County, Ky., to vote in a local election at the behest of my girlfriend at the time, who lived in Morehead. I felt really bad about it, because I knew I'd be leaving that community and would never be a permanent resident. I used my college residence hall address and had no issues. I presume, from seeing other posts, that state laws vary.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2019, 02:07:41 PM by hbelkins »
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cabiness42

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1060 on: October 11, 2019, 07:07:02 PM »

That’s so odd to me, especially since I went to a state school where residency was established by where your parents lived. Otherwise, I could have just moved into the dorm for a year and said, “oh, hey, I’m a NJ resident now!” (My family was living in PA at the time).

Actually, that's part of what I do for a living--answer students' questions about residency. Not sure how it works in NJ, but in CO, residency IS based on your parents' residence (by state law) and you are considered a dependent student until you turn 23. So even if you register to vote in CO (and work here, register your motor vehicle here, have a lease agreement, etc), you are still a dependent until 23.

Is that just for students or for everybody?  Seems really messed up that you could move out at 18, get a job, and 4 years later still legally be required to vote at your parents' address.
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jeffandnicole

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1061 on: October 11, 2019, 08:23:34 PM »

That’s so odd to me, especially since I went to a state school where residency was established by where your parents lived. Otherwise, I could have just moved into the dorm for a year and said, “oh, hey, I’m a NJ resident now!” (My family was living in PA at the time).

Actually, that's part of what I do for a living--answer students' questions about residency. Not sure how it works in NJ, but in CO, residency IS based on your parents' residence (by state law) and you are considered a dependent student until you turn 23. So even if you register to vote in CO (and work here, register your motor vehicle here, have a lease agreement, etc), you are still a dependent until 23.

Is that just for students or for everybody?  Seems really messed up that you could move out at 18, get a job, and 4 years later still legally be required to vote at your parents' address.

Looking at the state's voting question website it seems that it's only as long as your permanent address is your parent's address.  If you move out when you're 18, you can vote where you live.
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Mark68

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1062 on: October 14, 2019, 03:39:14 PM »

That’s so odd to me, especially since I went to a state school where residency was established by where your parents lived. Otherwise, I could have just moved into the dorm for a year and said, “oh, hey, I’m a NJ resident now!” (My family was living in PA at the time).

Actually, that's part of what I do for a living--answer students' questions about residency. Not sure how it works in NJ, but in CO, residency IS based on your parents' residence (by state law) and you are considered a dependent student until you turn 23. So even if you register to vote in CO (and work here, register your motor vehicle here, have a lease agreement, etc), you are still a dependent until 23.

Is that just for students or for everybody?  Seems really messed up that you could move out at 18, get a job, and 4 years later still legally be required to vote at your parents' address.

You can vote when you move here but you can't get residency until you turn 23. Or have a dependent of your own, get married, be a veteran, have been emancipated...


But the above situations have to have supporting documents.
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CNGL-Leudimin

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1063 on: October 15, 2019, 09:07:12 AM »

Back when US 340 ended in Winchester and Virginia signed it as East-West, one could go East on US 340 and enter West Virginia. This is still the case, but US 340 is now signed North-South ("Sideways" as I say).
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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1064 on: October 15, 2019, 09:40:09 AM »

Back when US 340 ended in Winchester and Virginia signed it as East-West, one could go East on US 340 and enter West Virginia. This is still the case, but US 340 is now signed North-South ("Sideways" as I say).

Because West Virginia is misnamed, it is possible to enter it from Virginia in any of the four directions.   Just in Mercer County, you can do three of the four.

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kphoger

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1065 on: October 15, 2019, 02:35:19 PM »

I could no longer be considered my parents' dependent for insurance purposes when I received more than 50% of my income on my own.  That's the reason I stopped flunking out of college full-time and instead decided to enroll part-time:  I only went to the classes I enjoyed, which meant failing the others, but I kept enrolling full-time in order to stay on my parents' insurance (another requirement).  Once we realized I couldn't stay on their insurance anyway because of my income, I went ahead and only enrolled in as many classes as I would actually attend.
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dlsterner

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1066 on: October 15, 2019, 10:28:58 PM »

Arkansas borders six other states.  It is possible to start somewhere in Arkansas, travel due south, and be able to cross into any of the bordering states.

(A different point for each of the bordering states)
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empirestate

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1067 on: October 16, 2019, 07:55:58 PM »

Arkansas borders six other states.  It is possible to start somewhere in Arkansas, travel due south, and be able to cross into any of the bordering states.

(A different point for each of the bordering states)

Once we get down to the fractal level, I'd guess this is possible from any state. ;-)
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sparker

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Re: This is true? - Geographic oddities that defy conventional wisdom
« Reply #1068 on: October 16, 2019, 10:11:40 PM »

Arkansas borders six other states.  It is possible to start somewhere in Arkansas, travel due south, and be able to cross into any of the bordering states.

(A different point for each of the bordering states)

Once we get down to the fractal level, I'd guess this is possible from any state. ;-)

When it comes to such directional access to all adjoining states, it would -- even at the fractal level -- come down to whether the border is based on natural geographic features (waterways, ridgelines, valleys) or simple straight surveyed lines.  Given that, there is no possibility within either Colorado or Wyoming for single-directional -- regardless of direction -- access to its neighbors, since its borders are predicated upon specific lines of latitude & longitude.  Compare that to California, where one could conceivably head north into any of the three adjoining states (AZ due to bends of the Colorado River).   
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CtrlAltDel

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Given that, there is no possibility within either Colorado or Wyoming for single-directional -- regardless of direction -- access to its neighbors, since its borders are predicated upon specific lines of latitude & longitude.

This is not quite true. Borders are defined by surveying, which is, of course, subject to various errors. As you can see in the following diagram, then, you can get to Montana from Wyoming by traveling due north, east and west.

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