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Author Topic: Washington  (Read 84895 times)

jakeroot

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Re: Washington
« Reply #825 on: May 08, 2020, 05:00:56 AM »

Question -- were the residents along the affected streets made part of the decision chain, or was this a top-down policy-driven mandate?  If the residents -- or an overwhelming majority of them -- acceded to the plan, it may well be considered valid; if imposed from above by well-meaning officials absent local input, not so much!  Perhaps the traffic lull resultant from the COVID problem was too much of an opportunity to ignore.  It'll be interesting to see the overall public reaction once the policy is fully instituted!     

It's very unlike Seattle not to impart their plans with local residents and develop goals based around their needs prior to any project (even smaller stuff). The more unusual thing here is the speed at which we went from no Healthy Streets, to permanent through-traffic closures. That indicates to me that public input was limited; the "Seattle process" usually precludes quick choices.

My guess is that blow-back will be stiff starting tomorrow, as more people become aware of the news. Local residents are likely indifferent to the decision, since they will continue to have access anyhow, but some roads like Lake Washington Blvd are not just scenic routes, but also important arterials, and redirected traffic could easily begin to ruin other streets, particularly as traffic returns back to original levels (which sucks, but it will absolutely happen).
« Last Edit: May 08, 2020, 05:06:40 AM by jakeroot »
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Bruce

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Re: Washington
« Reply #826 on: May 08, 2020, 06:26:47 PM »

Lake Washington Boulevard is indeed scenic, which is why it should be opened to pedestrian and cyclist traffic. It's already like that on Sundays in summer and doesn't cause massive gridlock. Simply requiring regular cars to turn off where possible (and use alternative routes that are also scenic) would have little effect on traffic but come with a huge boost in livability.

jakeroot

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Re: Washington
« Reply #827 on: May 09, 2020, 03:17:02 AM »

Lake Washington Boulevard is indeed scenic, which is why it should be opened to pedestrian and cyclist traffic. It's already like that on Sundays in summer and doesn't cause massive gridlock. Simply requiring regular cars to turn off where possible (and use alternative routes that are also scenic) would have little effect on traffic but come with a huge boost in livability.

One thing they've taught us in Urban Design is to not simply remove roadways, not least without serious consideration of traffic flow in the area; pushing cars off of one road is simply pushing them onto another, resulting in an increase of livability for one stretch, but a marked decrease for another.

Lake Washington Blvd isn't much of an arterial south/east of 49th, so I could see removing that stretch. But the rest is relatively important for north/south travel. Removing that road may result in an increase of traffic along Rainier, itself already experiencing plenty of issues. We don't need to be adding more cars to it, or adjacent neighborhood greenways. Let things balance out a bit. No reason to cram everyone onto one road, when we can design roads that allow car travel while not being a ruinous experience for pedestrians.

Down in the Tacoma Dome District, we are working on preliminary plans to close East 25th, between East D and the exit from the Sound Transit garage. This area has the Amtrak, Sounder, and Tacoma Link stations. Very heavy use by transit, and lots of pedestrians. The case is good. I just don't think SDOT has made the case for closing many of their roads. Not long term, at least.
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ErmineNotyours

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Re: Washington
« Reply #828 on: May 11, 2020, 09:57:48 PM »

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ErmineNotyours

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Re: Washington
« Reply #829 on: May 22, 2020, 12:08:24 AM »

Seattle Now & Then: West Seattle drawbridges, 1978

Someone asked earlier about the capacity of the older lower-level bridges.  The article said they were eight lanes, but the older photo shows the disabled bridge had three lanes.  They funneled the traffic onto four narrowed lanes on the remaining bridge.  Also the succession plans of West Seattle is discussed.
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jakeroot

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Re: Washington
« Reply #830 on: May 22, 2020, 12:25:04 AM »

Seattle Now & Then: West Seattle drawbridges, 1978

Someone asked earlier about the capacity of the older lower-level bridges.  The article said they were eight lanes, but the older photo shows the disabled bridge had three lanes.  They funneled the traffic onto four narrowed lanes on the remaining bridge.  Also the succession plans of West Seattle is discussed.

Cool article.

This video from Seattle Archives (which may not have aged well :-D) shows the old bridge in operation. Four lanes each way. Far left westbound lane was half concrete, half asphalt (see 1:12). Old aerial imagery suggests it was originally three lanes.


By the way: fantastic video for anyone that hasn't seen it, irrespective of the current situation.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 12:41:00 AM by jakeroot »
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TEG24601

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Re: Washington
« Reply #831 on: May 23, 2020, 12:14:17 PM »

The Seattle Times: What cracked the West Seattle Bridge? Hidden design problem may have doomed it all along


Several engineer friends I know were really upset that the anchor cables don't cover the full span, and always told me that they way they did the tensioning was considered by many to be a ticking time-bomb.
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They said take a left at the fork in the road.  I didn't think they literally meant a fork, until plain as day, there was a fork sticking out of the road at a junction.

 


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