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Author Topic: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s  (Read 1951 times)

lepidopteran

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Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« on: May 10, 2017, 08:11:32 PM »

This is a brochure about the Chicago Skyway from the late '70s.  Select image for an enlarged version to read the text.


Back of brochure, which includes a map.


Front of brochure, and a notice of an impending toll change (toll hike?). Not sure how to rotate it here, but selecting the link will take you to the Flickr page where it's righted.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2017, 08:21:11 PM by lepidopteran »
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sparker

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2017, 08:46:21 PM »

I suppose that once the I-94 "shunpiking" alternative was opened in the late 60's, the Skyway operators felt a need (or their bank accounts did!) to attempt to attract through traffic back to the Skyway/ITR basic route, which had originally been the default entry from the east.  The fact that it took them about 10 years to do so indicates that in all likelihood significant alternative traffic patterns took time to develop.  The I-94 Calumet routing is considerably longer and indirect than I-90, so shunpiking would have probably only been a contributing rather than causal factor for any loss of Skyway revenue; increased congestion over that time frame likely accounts for the traffic diversion -- hence, the PR effort that clearly illustrates the fact that the Skyway and the ITR western end does provide a more direct and shorter routing to points east vis--vis the I-94 alternative.
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Brandon

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2017, 01:29:17 PM »

Looks like anywhere from 1976 through 1978, judging from the mayor listed and the revised toll rate schedule.

I suppose that once the I-94 "shunpiking" alternative was opened in the late 60's, the Skyway operators felt a need (or their bank accounts did!) to attempt to attract through traffic back to the Skyway/ITR basic route, which had originally been the default entry from the east.  The fact that it took them about 10 years to do so indicates that in all likelihood significant alternative traffic patterns took time to develop.  The I-94 Calumet routing is considerably longer and indirect than I-90, so shunpiking would have probably only been a contributing rather than causal factor for any loss of Skyway revenue; increased congestion over that time frame likely accounts for the traffic diversion -- hence, the PR effort that clearly illustrates the fact that the Skyway and the ITR western end does provide a more direct and shorter routing to points east vis--vis the I-94 alternative.

The Skyway was a money-loser from day one.  Even with the slightly longer routing of the Borman, Kingery, Calumet, and Ryan Expressways, more traffic has consistently taken those than the Skyway.  By the time this brochure was made, the Skyway was practically empty and falling apart.  There was even talk of removing it altogether.  The only thing that saved it was the opening of the casinos in Indiana.
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sparker

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2017, 03:48:57 PM »

The Skyway was a money-loser from day one.  Even with the slightly longer routing of the Borman, Kingery, Calumet, and Ryan Expressways, more traffic has consistently taken those than the Skyway.  By the time this brochure was made, the Skyway was practically empty and falling apart.  There was even talk of removing it altogether.  The only thing that saved it was the opening of the casinos in Indiana.

Looks like the primary causality of any business failure regarding the Skyway was the structure maintenance (likely "deferred") and the management of the entity itself; the "shunpiking" alternative simply exacerbated the issue.  The question is (directed at Chicago-area posters who might supply some insight): if the Skyway itself failed or became untenable in the future, would the ROW be preserved for a lower-maintenance I-90 facility? -- or would some form of rerouting or realignment be considered more appropriate?     
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ET21

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2017, 05:30:01 PM »

Looks like anywhere from 1976 through 1978, judging from the mayor listed and the revised toll rate schedule.

I suppose that once the I-94 "shunpiking" alternative was opened in the late 60's, the Skyway operators felt a need (or their bank accounts did!) to attempt to attract through traffic back to the Skyway/ITR basic route, which had originally been the default entry from the east.  The fact that it took them about 10 years to do so indicates that in all likelihood significant alternative traffic patterns took time to develop.  The I-94 Calumet routing is considerably longer and indirect than I-90, so shunpiking would have probably only been a contributing rather than causal factor for any loss of Skyway revenue; increased congestion over that time frame likely accounts for the traffic diversion -- hence, the PR effort that clearly illustrates the fact that the Skyway and the ITR western end does provide a more direct and shorter routing to points east vis--vis the I-94 alternative.

The Skyway was a money-loser from day one.  Even with the slightly longer routing of the Borman, Kingery, Calumet, and Ryan Expressways, more traffic has consistently taken those than the Skyway.  By the time this brochure was made, the Skyway was practically empty

Shhhhhh, don't let everyone else know of a good traffic bypass  :-P :-P
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bbison

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2017, 05:57:53 PM »

Looks like anywhere from 1976 through 1978, judging from the mayor listed and the revised toll rate schedule.

I suppose that once the I-94 "shunpiking" alternative was opened in the late 60's, the Skyway operators felt a need (or their bank accounts did!) to attempt to attract through traffic back to the Skyway/ITR basic route, which had originally been the default entry from the east.  The fact that it took them about 10 years to do so indicates that in all likelihood significant alternative traffic patterns took time to develop.  The I-94 Calumet routing is considerably longer and indirect than I-90, so shunpiking would have probably only been a contributing rather than causal factor for any loss of Skyway revenue; increased congestion over that time frame likely accounts for the traffic diversion -- hence, the PR effort that clearly illustrates the fact that the Skyway and the ITR western end does provide a more direct and shorter routing to points east vis--vis the I-94 alternative.

The Skyway was a money-loser from day one.  Even with the slightly longer routing of the Borman, Kingery, Calumet, and Ryan Expressways, more traffic has consistently taken those than the Skyway.  By the time this brochure was made, the Skyway was practically empty and falling apart.  There was even talk of removing it altogether.  The only thing that saved it was the opening of the casinos in Indiana.

By the time this brochure was made, the Skyway was actually using radio advertising (Use the Skyway and save 9 miles!) to drum up business. Very strange times.
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tribar

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2017, 06:08:23 PM »

If the Skyway wants more business, perhaps they should lower their ridiculous tolls. $5 to go 7 miles is highway robbery.
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sparker

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2017, 12:48:28 AM »

If the Skyway wants more business, perhaps they should lower their ridiculous tolls. $5 to go 7 miles is highway robbery.

Every bridge across or near San Francisco Bay says a big "hello" (followed by "gimme 5 bucks!")  Of course, they've essentially got a captive audience, whereas the Skyway is eminently "shunnable". 
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SEWIGuy

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2017, 09:40:15 AM »

If the Skyway wants more business, perhaps they should lower their ridiculous tolls. $5 to go 7 miles is highway robbery.

Every bridge across or near San Francisco Bay says a big "hello" (followed by "gimme 5 bucks!")  Of course, they've essentially got a captive audience, whereas the Skyway is eminently "shunnable". 


It's also "shunnable" because most of the traffic entering the Chicagoland area isn't going to, or coming from downtown.  It's completely anecdotal on my part, but when I-94 heads onto the Bishop Ford from the south, or the Edens from the north, most of the traffic stays on the Tri-State. 

And as you mention, I-90 to Indiana versus I-94 saves you something like two miles.  Not worth it.
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kphoger

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2017, 11:44:50 AM »

Needs more exits.  Would improve the quality of life in nearby neighborhoods.

[/troll]
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I-39

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2017, 01:42:13 PM »

Question. If the Skyway was removed, how much of a "butterfly effect" would it have on area traffic?
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sparker

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2017, 03:27:17 PM »

Question. If the Skyway was removed, how much of a "butterfly effect" would it have on area traffic?

If it was removed without any replacement, with the ITR stub-ending at the state line, then it follows that the most immediate effect would be to create backups on the ITR west of the I-80/94 interchange -- at least until the notion that the west end of the ITR was no longer a through facility was internalized by most drivers/commuters.  Correspondingly, there would almost certainly be a dramatic spike in usage on the Borman (80/94), as it would be likely that I-90 would be rerouted on that facility. 

Now -- if Skyway removal was merely the first step toward a replacement facility -- on either new nearby alignment or the current (dare I say) "hypo....hypo.....hypotenuse" trajectory -- then it's likely that the same scenario outlined above would occur, but, of course, temporarily.  But not all of metro Chicago would be affected by this, only the commuter and commercial movement around the south side of Lake Michigan.
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dzlsabe

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2017, 03:30:53 PM »

Now theres a great idea. Remove the Skyway. Maybe ITR after that? Ive got an idea where that "butterfly effect" is happening right now. :spin:

How would that even happen? The lessees just decide one day to back out? They cant. Ridiculous. :spin:

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« Last Edit: May 13, 2017, 09:02:03 PM by dzlsabe »
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I-39

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2017, 04:01:55 PM »

Question. If the Skyway was removed, how much of a "butterfly effect" would it have on area traffic?

If it was removed without any replacement, with the ITR stub-ending at the state line, then it follows that the most immediate effect would be to create backups on the ITR west of the I-80/94 interchange -- at least until the notion that the west end of the ITR was no longer a through facility was internalized by most drivers/commuters.  Correspondingly, there would almost certainly be a dramatic spike in usage on the Borman (80/94), as it would be likely that I-90 would be rerouted on that facility. 

Now -- if Skyway removal was merely the first step toward a replacement facility -- on either new nearby alignment or the current (dare I say) "hypo....hypo.....hypotenuse" trajectory -- then it's likely that the same scenario outlined above would occur, but, of course, temporarily.  But not all of metro Chicago would be affected by this, only the commuter and commercial movement around the south side of Lake Michigan.

I wrote it wrong, I meant what kind of a butterfly effect would it have had on traffic today if it had been removed in the 70s (as Brandon alluded to earlier).
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sparker

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2017, 04:14:48 PM »

Well then.......as the late great Gilda Radner's iconic character Emily Litella would say, never mind!.

That being said.....if the removal had been done in the '70's, then it's not unlikely that the ITR west of 80/94 would have been downgraded and possibly itself removed and the ROW used for a surface facility or something else.  The Borman would probably be at least 5+5 lanes west to the present 94 split, since it would also carry I-90.  I wouldn't be surprised to see I-90 multiplexed with I-294 as far as the Hillside Strangler, with the original alignment NW of there over what is now I-290 remaining I-90;  I-94 would be doing a solo turn through downtown Chicago.  The Kennedy west of I-94 and the east end of the NW Tollway would likely be an x90.  And because there would only be one freeway facility extending east from Chicago into Indiana, a proposal like the Illiana (but probably somewhat north of that concept) would have already been developed as a relief route.  BTW, the Ike would likely be an extension of I-88 by this time.       
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tribar

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2017, 06:45:17 PM »

It's back.
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ILRoad55

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2017, 09:48:18 PM »

What happened to the exits on the Skyway? There's only like the Stony Island exit/entrance now.

Also I just wanted to note that there was once Toll Plazas at Naperville Road and Deerfield Road. Although I think I remember the Deerfield Road one, not sure.
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Joe The Dragon

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #17 on: May 13, 2017, 12:02:49 AM »

What happened to the exits on the Skyway? There's only like the Stony Island exit/entrance now.

Also I just wanted to note that there was once Toll Plazas at Naperville Road and Deerfield Road. Although I think I remember the Deerfield Road one, not sure.

 Naperville road was just an part ramp toll and it looked like it was an old ticket system ramp setup.

Deerfield toll was removed
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slorydn1

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #18 on: May 13, 2017, 12:42:43 AM »

Lived in the NW 'burbs from 1979-1990, and had been to Chicagoland from the Grand Rapids MI area a few times before 1979. We never took the Skyway. No matter how much my little brother and I pushed for it so we could add that to our list our dad would not have it. His thing was that he didn't want to "pay for the privledge of having the car eaten by a huge pothole".

My dad was not a shunpiker, far from it. He usually would take the easiest way to get somewhere and if it cost money to do it, he was ok with it. But, he hated the Skyway and just wouldn't go there.

The last time I visited the area (summer 1991) I went up to pick up my little brother and bring him and my mom's car down here to New Bern when my dad retired and was preparing to move here. I was halfway to Indy on I-65 when I went "Damn I should have taken the Skyway just this one time!"

My memories of heading up and down the Dan Ryan on trips in/out of Chicago is that I don't remember seeing alot of cars merging in from/getting off for the Skyway at the 90/94 split no matter the traffic or time of day on the Ryan. I am not so sure had the Skyway closed in the 70's if it would have been all that disatrous a situation on the Illinois side and I think Indiana would have figured out a way to survive without it after some reconfiguring of routes.
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dzlsabe

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #19 on: May 13, 2017, 12:59:30 AM »

If the Skyway wants more business, perhaps they should lower their ridiculous tolls. $5 to go 7 miles is highway robbery.

So $0 to/from 87th St would be OK/better then?
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Brandon

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #20 on: May 13, 2017, 07:36:16 AM »

What happened to the exits on the Skyway? There's only like the Stony Island exit/entrance now.

Also I just wanted to note that there was once Toll Plazas at Naperville Road and Deerfield Road. Although I think I remember the Deerfield Road one, not sure.

 Naperville road was just an part ramp toll and it looked like it was an old ticket system ramp setup.

However, it never was for a ticket system.  It was always a coin basket.
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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #21 on: May 13, 2017, 07:47:53 AM »

Needs more exits.  Would improve the quality of life in nearby neighborhoods.

[/troll]
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Revive 755

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Re: Chicago Skyway brochure from late 70s
« Reply #22 on: May 13, 2017, 10:58:33 AM »

That being said.....if the removal had been done in the '70's, then it's not unlikely that the ITR west of 80/94 would have been downgraded and possibly itself removed and the ROW used for a surface facility or something else.

I'm not sure they would have cut if off at I-80/I-94 - they might have let it continue west to I-65 or to end at the future north-south section of IN 912 (which appears to have been built in the early 80's).  Assuming the IN 912 freeway would still be built without the Skyway, I could see the IN 912 freeway actually being constructed west into Illinois to end at I-94 (the transportation plans back in the 1960's and early 70' had it as a future freeway facility all the way to I-57 even with the Skyway).
     
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