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Author Topic: Georgia  (Read 361776 times)

lordsutch

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #750 on: December 30, 2015, 05:46:31 PM »

BTW, GDOT has launched a study of the Downtown Connector in Atlanta. Hopefully some practical ideas can come out of this study...
http://www.dot.ga.gov/BS/Studies/DowntownConnector

Some sort of express-local setup is probably the best that can be hoped for. At the very least it would reduce the breakdown in through traffic flow from all the exiting and entering traffic.

Reviving GA 400 south of I-85 to I-285 would probably help too, but I'm not sure if there'd be enough through traffic to make it a viable toll road, which is the only way it'd be constructed I think.
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #751 on: December 30, 2015, 06:13:37 PM »

I think an express-local lane setup would work, but it would have to use existing right-of-way. Considering all of the development that is happening in Midtown and Downtown, the city would not want to see valuable land eaten up by a freeway. However, I know the Midtown Alliance wants to see a new exit built at 15th Street. As regards to extending 400 south, that's a no-go. The eastside neighborhoods fought those plans 40 years ago and won and in those 40 years, Atlanta's eastside neighborhoods like Virginia-Highland, Old Fourth Ward and Inman Park have become some of the mot sought after real estate in the region.
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lordsutch

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #752 on: December 30, 2015, 06:55:25 PM »

I think an express-local lane setup would work, but it would have to use existing right-of-way. Considering all of the development that is happening in Midtown and Downtown, the city would not want to see valuable land eaten up by a freeway. However, I know the Midtown Alliance wants to see a new exit built at 15th Street.

... which would just make the congestion worse, since a lot of it is due to traffic jockeying for position to exit or enter the connector between I-20 and the split.

To stay in the existing footprint, you'd probably have to either bury or elevate the express lanes. The MARTA bridge probably precludes elevated lanes, which leaves something like I-635 in Dallas as the remaining option.

Quote
As regards to extending 400 south, that's a no-go. The eastside neighborhoods fought those plans 40 years ago and won and in those 40 years, Atlanta's eastside neighborhoods like Virginia-Highland, Old Fourth Ward and Inman Park have become some of the mot sought after real estate in the region.

My understanding is that the semi-serious proposals for 400 south would have it tunneled, likely without any access points, between I-20 and I-85. Granted that doesn't mean there wouldn't be any South Pasadena-style hysteria about tunnel subsidence or radon or whatever, but the actual surface impacts would be minimal.
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #753 on: January 03, 2016, 05:08:27 PM »

Here's a diagram showing the layout of the Talbotton/Warm Springs Rd widening in Collumbus. The project will get underway this year.

A description of the project...
"Beginning in 2016, GDOT will widen 1.9 miles of  Talbotton/Warm Springs Rd between 7th Ave and Woodruff Rd/Hilton Ave. The work would include reconstructing Talbotton Road/Warm Springs Road from an existing 2‐lane alternating urban/rural section to a 4‐lane urban section.  The typical would consist of four, 11‐foot wide travel lanes (two in each direction), a 16‐foot wide raised median, and 12‐foot wide urban shoulder with a 5‐foot wide sidewalk on at least one side of the project (on both sides of the roadway in residential areas). Turn lanes will be constructed at intersections as required.  Dual left turn lanes will be constructed on both approaches along Warm Springs Road at the intersection with Woodruff Road/Hilton Avenue."
Talbotton/Warm Springs Rd widening-Columbus,GA by brandon walker, on Flickr
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #754 on: January 03, 2016, 08:05:37 PM »

More project diagrams from the GDOT files! First up is the proposed widening of U.S. 27 through LaGrange.
U.S. 27 Widening-LaGrange
U.S. 27/SR1 widening-LaGrange,GA by brandon walker, on Flickr

U.S. 27/SR 1 widening-LaGrange,GA by brandon walker, on Flickr

Last is the proposed Third Army Road interchange with I-75. Below is a description of the project and renderings...
Third Army Rd/I-75 interchange-Cobb/Bartow County
GDOT is proposing to build a new limited-access highway from the existing Dabbs Bridge Rd in Paulding County, thru Cobb and Bartow County, to a new interchange at I-75. The new interchange would be located approx. halfway between the bridges over Joe Stella Drive and the bridges over Lake Allatoona. The new limited-access highway would consist of two to three lanes in each direction, with a 24-foot raised median. The new road will be parallel to and lie north of the existing Third Army Rd. The new highway will also include a new grade separated intersection with U.S. 41/Cobb Parkway. To the west of U.S. 41, the proposed project will include the relocation of Dabbs Bridge Rd. The earliest construction would begin is 2018.
Third Army Rd/I-75 Interchange-Cobb/Bartow County by brandon walker, on Flickr

Third Army Road/I-75 Interchange-Cobb/Bartow County by brandon walker, on Flickr
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jeffandnicole

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #755 on: January 04, 2016, 10:41:19 AM »

Third Army Road/I-75 Interchange-Cobb/Bartow County by brandon walker, on Flickr

Ramp leading onto US 41, bottom left: There's no acceleration lane depicted in the perspective view.  Does that mean there'll be a stop sign at the bottom of this ramp?

And why does the ramp onto Third Army Road look like it can handle turns from either direction on 41?
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Tom958

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #756 on: January 10, 2016, 09:02:44 AM »

And why does the ramp onto Third Army Road look like it can handle turns from either direction on 41?

For the same reason that all of the roundabout interchanges shown here are dumbells instead of dogbones.  :spin:

Here are some APL's on I-285 approaching I-75. I almost typed "newish," but Streetview has them going up between Oct 2014 and Mar 2015. A case could be made for posting this in a more general signage thread, but this often-epic thread could use a little :wub: at the moment.  :love:

First, still sticking with traditional signage closer to the first offramp than usual. There are four lanes here, but a fifth lane is added on the right shortly before the US 41 exit. That means that both of the right lanes here are option lanes-- not an easy thing to sign by any method. More on that below.



The first APL sign. Note the lack of exit only panels. The fifth lane is added on the right just beyond those bridges. Ideally the legend for I-75 would be between the two right arrows, but it won't fit. Maybe they could try

75
Atlanta
Chatta
nooga

 :-D  :-D  :-D

 One of the challenges of signing this configuration is to communicate that there's a lane drop, but to do so in such a way as not to prompt panicked and possibly unnecessary lanes changing. I've never liked the little California-style exit only tabs, but putting them on the right arrow here would be a really good idea, IMO, especially since we're within well less than a mile of the lane drop. They'd also offer a clue that the configuration shown for the ramp to 75 isn't exactly as it's shown.



Next one, at the ramp for US 41. Fairly unusually for Georgia, the gantry is placed nearly at the nose of the gore. A case could've been made for using a conventional sign for the exit, which would've made it logical to use a split arrow for the upcoming 285-75 divergence, but instead they used the same pattern that Georgia uses where there is no option lane. Oh, well, at least the sign legends are where they're supposed to be in relation to the arrows. Off the topic of sign geekery, the cranes beyond are for the new Braves stadium.



Finally, at the 285-75 split. This time, the gantry is located slightly past the nose of the gore, and therefore once again no split arrow is used. That means that even though there are two successive option lanes, these three APL signs use a grand total of one split arrow between them.
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #757 on: January 12, 2016, 12:49:29 AM »

I found these two maps on GDOT's website today. GDOT is really making a big deal of the new funding they are getting because of HB 170 aka the Transportation Funding Act of 2015. Lots of projects are planned in Metro Atlanta, Savannah and other areas of the state over the next 10 years. Projects that caught my eye were the truck only lanes planned for 75 south from S.R. 155 to I-475 North and the state is FINALLY rebuilding the I-16/I-95 interchange and widening I-16 to I-516. All three projects are desperately needed. In the second map it shows the GRIP corridors that will be built over the next 10 years as well. Lots of exciting projects to look forward to between now and 2025.

GDOT Major Mobility Investments by brandon walker, on Flickr

GDOT Freight Mobility GRIP Plans by brandon walker, on Flickr
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Tom958

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #758 on: January 12, 2016, 07:06:39 AM »

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xcellntbuy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #759 on: January 12, 2016, 07:25:49 AM »

From the multicolored map, of personal interest is the widening of US 129 and 441 north of Eatonton to Madison at Interstate 20.  Some sections of the road between these two small cities 20 miles north of the old capital are three lanes (an alternating passing lane) through farmland and forested areas.  The pavement is deeply rutted in many places.   :wave:
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #760 on: January 12, 2016, 03:38:20 PM »

The governor today announced a 10-year, $10 billion transportation plan. The highlights include express toll lanes along I-285 north of I-20, rebuilding both of the I-285 interchanges with I-20, express toll lanes on 400, truck only lanes on I-75 between Macon and Locust Grove, rebuilding the I-16/I-95 interchange in Savannah and widening 7 miles of I-16 in Savannah.

Quote
Within the plan is an 18-month list of road resurfacings and bridge repairs and replacements that will cost $2.2 billion. New construction, including interstate express lanes and improvements at interstate exchanges across metro Atlanta, will come later.“One year ago, I stood before the General Assembly and urged members to prioritize Georgia’s transportation needs,” Deal said during a ceremony at the Capitol. “Legislators on both sides of the aisle took action, working together to pass legislation addressing these critical needs. Today, we are delivering on our promise.”

Georgia Commissioner of Transportation Russell McMurry said the 18-month project list calls for resurfacing more than 2,500 miles of roadways, replacing 118 deteriorating bridges and repairing 300 others. Construction crews also will improve 109 intersections and widen 36 stretches of highway from two lanes to four.
"We now have the ability to start addressing the backlog of work to Georgia's critical infrastructure and increase preventive maintenance across the state," McMurry said. "Our first priority is to take care of the existing transportation system."
http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/blog/capitol_vision/2016/01/deal-wants-10-billion-10-year-transportation.html
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #761 on: January 12, 2016, 03:39:06 PM »

Quote
Georgia plans to build separate lanes for large trucks on Interstate 75 between Macon and exit 155 in McDonough as part of the state's transportation plan.

The new lanes will provide "separation for trucks from the normal passenger cars. So that's definitely a safety improvement, that's definitely a mobility improvement," Georgia Department of Transportation Commissioner Russell McMurry said Tuesday.

McMurry was speaking at a news conference led by Republican Gov. Nathan Deal to unveil the list of projects that will be funded by several tax and fee changes made last year.

Deal said the projects will reduce congestion and make Georgia's roads safer.

The Legislature passed a new $5 fee per night on hotel and motel stays and new charges for alternative fuel vehicles. Lawmakers also changed the gasoline tax to a tax on volume of gas instead of the sales price, resulting in a rise of five to six cents a gallon when the law went into effect.

Some Republicans called it a big tax increase and refused to vote for it. The bill that contained all the changes, House Bill 170, only passed after contentious debate and with some Democrat support.

The measures in House Bill 170 are expected to raise about $700 million for transportation in the fiscal year that ends in July, McMurry said. The following year, the measures are projected to raise about $830 million.

Read more here: http://www.macon.com/news/local/politics-government/article54295830.html#storylink=cpy
http://www.macon.com/news/local/politics-government/article54295830.html
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #762 on: January 13, 2016, 11:28:51 AM »

The AJC broke down the cost of each project. By far the most expensive projects will be the express toll lanes on 285. The lanes on the top will cost $5.9 Billion :-o! The only other projects in the Billionaires club are the express lanes on 400 at $2.4 Billion and $2 Billion for the truck only lanes on 75 between Macon and McDonough.
http://www.myajc.com/news/news/local/gov-nathan-deal-unveils-10-year-10-billion-transpo/np35c/
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #763 on: January 18, 2016, 10:04:34 PM »

A 3.5 mile section of the Fall Line Freeway will open Tuesday...
http://www.13wmaz.com/story/news/local/milledgeville/2016/01/18/fall-line-freeway/78979202/
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #764 on: January 18, 2016, 10:46:20 PM »

A diagram of the new DDI currently being built at I-95 and S.R. 21 in Port Wentworth.
I-95/S.R. 21 DDI-Chatham County by brandon walker, on Flickr
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D-Dey65

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #765 on: January 19, 2016, 01:06:34 PM »

I still need info on US 301 info in Georgia, for that Wikipedia article on US 301, and I'd like some info on where it crosses the Jesup City Line, when it leaves Statesboro city limits going north, and most importantly, does the US 301 Business Route in Sylvania still exist, or is that just SR 73?
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Gnutella

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #766 on: January 28, 2016, 12:48:24 AM »

I found these two maps on GDOT's website today. GDOT is really making a big deal of the new funding they are getting because of HB 170 aka the Transportation Funding Act of 2015. Lots of projects are planned in Metro Atlanta, Savannah and other areas of the state over the next 10 years. Projects that caught my eye were the truck only lanes planned for 75 south from S.R. 155 to I-475 North and the state is FINALLY rebuilding the I-16/I-95 interchange and widening I-16 to I-516. All three projects are desperately needed. In the second map it shows the GRIP corridors that will be built over the next 10 years as well. Lots of exciting projects to look forward to between now and 2025.

GDOT Major Mobility Investments by brandon walker, on Flickr

GDOT Freight Mobility GRIP Plans by brandon walker, on Flickr

I'm glad to see that I-85 will be six-laned north to Commerce at least, and I'm also glad to see that U.S. 441 will be four-laned between Athens and Milledgeville, but my enthusiasm is tempered when I see no plans to six-lane I-85 north to the South Carolina state line, or four-lane U.S. 129 between Eatonton and Gray (with a bypass around Gray). The former would put some pressure on South Carolina to do something with I-85, and the latter would provide four lanes the entire way between Athens and Macon.
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Thing 342

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #767 on: January 28, 2016, 10:34:19 AM »

I found these two maps on GDOT's website today. GDOT is really making a big deal of the new funding they are getting because of HB 170 aka the Transportation Funding Act of 2015. Lots of projects are planned in Metro Atlanta, Savannah and other areas of the state over the next 10 years. Projects that caught my eye were the truck only lanes planned for 75 south from S.R. 155 to I-475 North and the state is FINALLY rebuilding the I-16/I-95 interchange and widening I-16 to I-516. All three projects are desperately needed. In the second map it shows the GRIP corridors that will be built over the next 10 years as well. Lots of exciting projects to look forward to between now and 2025.

<images snipped>

I'm glad to see that I-85 will be six-laned north to Commerce at least, and I'm also glad to see that U.S. 441 will be four-laned between Athens and Milledgeville, but my enthusiasm is tempered when I see no plans to six-lane I-85 north to the South Carolina state line, or four-lane U.S. 129 between Eatonton and Gray (with a bypass around Gray). The former would put some pressure on South Carolina to do something with I-85, and the latter would provide four lanes the entire way between Athens and Macon.

I don't really think that 85 needs to be widened all the way to SC, at least not as much as some other projects in the state. Of all the times I've driven it, it doesn't seem to be particularly busy past Braselton. Also, I feel as though SC has done its fair share of work on improving I-85, widening it from Anderson all the way to Spartanburg
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lordsutch

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #768 on: January 28, 2016, 03:23:06 PM »

I'm glad to see that I-85 will be six-laned north to Commerce at least, and I'm also glad to see that U.S. 441 will be four-laned between Athens and Milledgeville, but my enthusiasm is tempered when I see no plans to six-lane I-85 north to the South Carolina state line, or four-lane U.S. 129 between Eatonton and Gray (with a bypass around Gray). The former would put some pressure on South Carolina to do something with I-85, and the latter would provide four lanes the entire way between Athens and Macon.

The 4-lane Gray bypass is already under construction (northern loop, from just west of the U.S. 129/GA 18 intersection west of Gray to GA 22 east of Gray) and there is an LRTP project (actually several separate ones) for widening U.S. 129 between Eatonton and Gray; I guess since it's not part of GRIP it isn't on the priority list.

Here's the southern section, programmed for construction in 2040. Can't find the others off-hand.

That said that section of U.S. 129 at the moment could probably make do with just passing lanes. The traffic really only picks up north of Eatonton to Madison with the added U.S. 441 traffic.

Further north, GA 44 between Eatonton and I-20 also probably needs improvements more than its multiplex with U.S. 129 south of there. The first bit is already in ROW acquisition, which will bypass Eatonton to the north.
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #769 on: January 29, 2016, 11:42:06 PM »

Georgia 316 should have been upgraded decades ago. It's poor planning on GDOT's part that its not. While they are planning several interchange projects to make more of the highway limited access, it will take a lot more...
Quote
The congestion and fatalities along Ga. 316 between Athens and Duluth have made improving the 40-mile highway a top priority for legislators from Clarke, Oconee, Barrow and Gwinnett counties. The legislative delegations from the three counties jointly backed a white paper this week listing reasons for making the road a limited-access highway its entire length so that intersecting roads would cross via an overpass.

“The critical infrastructure of (State Route) 316 has been ignored to the detriment of the economic interests of the region and the safety of its citizens and visitors,” said the paper dated Thursday.

Rep. Regina Quick, R-Athens, and Rep. Spencer Frye, D-Athens, had their staffs work together on the paper for presentation Thursday to the House Transportation Committee. It was timed for the committee’s vote on a 10-year plan required by last year’s road-funding bill. The committee ultimately approved the plan unanimously, but not before Rep. Valerie Clark, R-Lawrenceville, brought up the Ga. 316 concerns.


Now the plan goes to the House Appropriations Committee which must approve the department’s budget.

Quick said Friday she remains insistent that every intersection on the highway be upgraded.

“The citizens affected by 316 deserve results after a half-century of broken promises by GDOT. Transportation dollars should be focused on needs, not wants and selected projects should be based on identifiable criteria,” she said.

According to the paper, the origin of the highway was a decision in 1959 by then-Gov. Ernest Vandiver to divert the route of the planned Interstate 85 toward his home of Franklin County, a stretch that now bears his name. At the time, he promised equivalent access for Athens and Gainesville.

While Gainesville is connected to I-85 by I-985, the road to the Classic City is still dotted with intersections and stoplights. The paper details the 31 fatalities on Ga. 316 since it opened in 1995 and the roughly 600 crashes that occur in the average year.

So far, 5 miles of Ga. 316 in Gwinnett County are limited access.

The latest list from the Transportation Department includes 17 projects at intersections across all three counties over the next 10 years described as “interchange,” “ramp” and “grade separation” which are part of a limited-access design.

But Rep. Buzz Brockway, R-Lawrenceville, attended Thursday’s committee meeting and came away frustrated.

“Living in Lawrenceville, I’ve personally seen accidents and witnessed many close calls on Hwy 316,” he said. “I hope the House and Senate modify the DOT’s 10-year plan to make 316 completely limited access - not just portions of it as the plan currently does.”
http://m.onlineathens.com/#article=8225A1CC16171E41A4C461421E3F3047A405
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Gnutella

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #770 on: January 30, 2016, 01:17:17 AM »

Georgia 316 should have been upgraded decades ago. It's poor planning on GDOT's part that its not. While they are planning several interchange projects to make more of the highway limited access, it will take a lot more...
Quote
The congestion and fatalities along Ga. 316 between Athens and Duluth have made improving the 40-mile highway a top priority for legislators from Clarke, Oconee, Barrow and Gwinnett counties. The legislative delegations from the three counties jointly backed a white paper this week listing reasons for making the road a limited-access highway its entire length so that intersecting roads would cross via an overpass.

“The critical infrastructure of (State Route) 316 has been ignored to the detriment of the economic interests of the region and the safety of its citizens and visitors,” said the paper dated Thursday.

Rep. Regina Quick, R-Athens, and Rep. Spencer Frye, D-Athens, had their staffs work together on the paper for presentation Thursday to the House Transportation Committee. It was timed for the committee’s vote on a 10-year plan required by last year’s road-funding bill. The committee ultimately approved the plan unanimously, but not before Rep. Valerie Clark, R-Lawrenceville, brought up the Ga. 316 concerns.


Now the plan goes to the House Appropriations Committee which must approve the department’s budget.

Quick said Friday she remains insistent that every intersection on the highway be upgraded.

“The citizens affected by 316 deserve results after a half-century of broken promises by GDOT. Transportation dollars should be focused on needs, not wants and selected projects should be based on identifiable criteria,” she said.

According to the paper, the origin of the highway was a decision in 1959 by then-Gov. Ernest Vandiver to divert the route of the planned Interstate 85 toward his home of Franklin County, a stretch that now bears his name. At the time, he promised equivalent access for Athens and Gainesville.

While Gainesville is connected to I-85 by I-985, the road to the Classic City is still dotted with intersections and stoplights. The paper details the 31 fatalities on Ga. 316 since it opened in 1995 and the roughly 600 crashes that occur in the average year.

So far, 5 miles of Ga. 316 in Gwinnett County are limited access.

The latest list from the Transportation Department includes 17 projects at intersections across all three counties over the next 10 years described as “interchange,” “ramp” and “grade separation” which are part of a limited-access design.

But Rep. Buzz Brockway, R-Lawrenceville, attended Thursday’s committee meeting and came away frustrated.

“Living in Lawrenceville, I’ve personally seen accidents and witnessed many close calls on Hwy 316,” he said. “I hope the House and Senate modify the DOT’s 10-year plan to make 316 completely limited access - not just portions of it as the plan currently does.”
http://m.onlineathens.com/#article=8225A1CC16171E41A4C461421E3F3047A405

I drive GA 316 very frequently, and I support making it a limited-access highway. While they're at it, they should widen it to at least six lanes and give it full shoulders on both sides. (West of Harbins Road should be eight lanes.) The two segments that should be upgraded first are from GA 20/GA 124 to Harbins Road, and Patrick Mill Road to GA 11. After that, they should focus on the segment from U.S. 78 to the Athens Perimeter, including a radically reconfigured interchange with the Perimeter. The segments from Harbins Road to Patrick Mill Road, and GA 11 to U.S. 78, can be done last.
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #771 on: February 01, 2016, 07:53:45 AM »

A Michigan Left intersection is coming to Georgia...

Quote
The design, also called a ThrU-turn intersection, is supposed to relieve congestion and improve safety at the intersection of Ga. 141 (Medlock Bridge Road) and State Bridge Road, according to the city’s website.

The novelty of the design is that it eliminates left turns. Drivers wanting to turn left continue straight through the intersection, make a U-turn a short distance past it and then double back to make a right turn onto the street they wish to travel on.

“It seems counter-intuitive, but people will actually spend less time driving through the intersection and making a U turn than they do sitting through two or three red lights,” said Johns Creek Public Works Director Tom Black in a press release.

Computer-modeling conducted on behalf of the city shows wait times could be slashed by three-quarters with a ThrU-turn design.

ThrU-turns also can reduce crashes by 20 to 50 percent, particularly the head-on and angle crashes that tend to cause more severe injuries, according to the Federal Highway Administration.
http://commuting.blog.ajc.com/2016/02/01/johns-creek-may-build-georgias-first-michigan-turn-intersection/
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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #772 on: February 05, 2016, 03:36:43 PM »

The City of Augusta is planning to reconstruct the Wrightsboro/Interstate 520 interchange as a contraflow left interchange. Work could begin this fall.
Wrightsboro Rd/I-520 Interchange Improvement Project-Augusta by brandon walker, on Flickr
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Georgia

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #773 on: February 05, 2016, 04:07:09 PM »

just glad to see the state and its municipalities be willing to try something new instead of repeating the same mistakes over and over.

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afguy

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Re: Georgia
« Reply #774 on: February 07, 2016, 06:48:50 AM »

I found some more detailed information on the mobility projects GDOT is planning...
I-285/I-20 East Interchange
A routine source of peak period delays, this critical
juncture between two heavily congested interstates in
DeKalb County requires operational and geometry
improvements to address the inefficient flow of traffic, and
safety/operational performance. To address these needs,
various improvements would be developed and constructed
to enhance the overall operation, safety and efficient flow
characteristics of the interchange.
The interchange project would include operational
improvements to the directional ramps including
reconstruction of the I-20 eastbound to I-285 southbound
ramp and the I-285 southbound to I-20 westbound ramp.
In addition to the reconstruction of the interchange,
the project may include:
• One westbound auxiliary lane from Panola Road to
 Wesley Chapel Road and the construction of
 westbound Collector-Distributor (CD) lanes between
 Wesley Chapel Road and the I-20/I-285 interchange.
• A westbound auxiliary lane between Lithonia Industrial
 Boulevard and Panola Road.
• Reconstruction of the Miller Road Overpass Bridge to
 accommodate the westbound auxiliary lane.
• I-20 eastbound improvements to include construction
 of one eastbound auxiliary lane from Panola Road to
 Lithonia Industrial Boulevard.
• Reconstruction of the Fairington Road/DeKalb Medical
 Parkway Overpass Bridge to accommodate the
 eastbound auxiliary lane.
The proposed interchange may include Express Lane
connections in the future.
Estimated Costs*: $534 Million (does not include costs
associated with Express Lane connections)

I-285/I-20 West Interchange
The interchange project would consist of lane widening and operational improvements
on I-20 eastbound and westbound to improve the existing lane balance on sections
between Thornton Road and the I-285 Interchange. The project will include:
• Additional lane along I-20 eastbound from Factory Shoals Road Bridge to Six
 Flags Parkway.
• Widening of I-20 eastbound to five lanes from Six Flags Parkway to I-285 southbound.
• Additional lane from the I-20 eastbound to I-285 southbound ramp to I-20
 eastbound to I-285 northbound ramp exit to provide a separate exit lane for
 the I-285 northbound traffic flow, thus requiring the widening of the existing
 I-20 bridge.
• A Collector-Distributor system (CD) is proposed between the I-285 Interchange and
 Fulton Industrial Boulevard westbound on I-20.
• Reconfiguration of the four existing left-hand exits to right-hand exits with new
 alignments and bridges as appropriate. It is anticipated the existing left-hand exits
 would be utilized for managed lane connections between I-285 and I-20.
The proposed interchange may include Express Lane connections in the future.
Estimated Costs*: $910 Million (does not include costs associated with Express
Lane connections)

I-285 West Wall Express Lanes, I-20 to I-75
The project would consist of :
• Creating one Express Lane in each direction along I-285 between I-20 and I-75.
• Existing lanes would be maintained and a new 12’ outside lane would be constructed.
• The Express Lane would be separated from the general purpose lanes through the
 use of delineators and pavement striping.
• Access to the Express Lane would be provided with the use of direct access ramps
 connecting to the surrounding arterial system and slip ramp access to adjacent
 general purpose lanes.
Estimated Costs*: $743 Million

I-285 East Wall Express Lanes, I-85 to I-20
The project would consist of:
• Creating one Express Lane in each direction along I-285 between I-20 and I-85.
• Existing lanes would be maintained and a new 12’ outside lane would be constructed.
• Express Lane would be separated from the general purpose lanes through the use
 of delineators and pavement striping.
• Access to the managed lane would be provided with the use of direct access ramps
 connecting to the surrounding arterial system and slip ramp access to adjacent
 general purpose lanes.
Estimated Costs*: $659 Million

Revive 285, Express Lanes from I-75 to I-85
The project would consist of the construction of two Express Lanes in each direction, on the
outside of the existing general purpose travel lanes, with operational improvements and
Collector-Distributor (CD) systems at various locations along I-285. Specific operational and
CD system improvements currently being considered for the project include:
• One I-285 westbound auxiliary lane between Roswell Road and Riverside Drive.
• I-75 North/I-285 interchange improvements.
• I-85 North/I-285 interchange improvements.
• I-285 CD lanes from Ashford-Dunwoody Road to SR 141/Peachtree Industrial Boulevard.
• I-285 CD lanes from US 23/Buford Highway to I-85.
• The Express Lanes will directly connect to Express Lanes on I-75, I-85 and SR 400.
Estimated Costs*: $5.9 Billion

I-16/95 Interchange & Widening I-16: I-95 to I-516
(2 Separate Projects)
These projects would reconstruct the existing I-16 at I-95 interchange in
Chatham County. Proposed improvements include:
• Construction of new fly overs and extension of ramps.
• One additional general-purpose lane along I-16 between I-95 and I-516.
• The new lanes would be constructed by widening to the existing inside,
 grassed median.
Estimated Costs*: $244 Million

I-75 Truck Lanes: McDonough to Macon
This interstate highway serves as an important freight and motorist corridor that supports
critical coastal port truck traffic and travelers from southern Georgia and Florida. While
truck and passenger car traffic are generally compatible, as the percentage of truck traffic
continues to grow, the increase in truck volume can and will accentuate operational
differences, leading to less efficient traffic streams and increased delays. For example,
compared to cars, trucks cannot accelerate as quickly on long grades. The corridor has
an important evolving need to ensure mobility for all its users and especially to maintain
Georgia’s competitiveness in the movement of goods. By using the Express Lane concept,
and providing a dedicated system of lanes separated from existing general purpose lanes,
mobility is enhanced for both traffic streams. Project would include:
• Addition of two designated, separated truck lanes in the northbound direction along
 I-75 from McDonough to I-475 in Macon.
• The truck lanes would be barrier-separated from the general purpose lanes
 along I-75.
• The truck lanes will not be tolled.
• The final northern limits will be determined once additional environmental and
 traffic studies are conducted.
Estimated Costs*: $2.06 Billion

SR 400 Express Lanes: I-285 to McFarland Road
SR 400 is one of the most congested facilities in metro Atlanta. The addition of Express
Lanes to this corridor will provide additional reliable capacity from I-285 to McFarland
Road. The proposed Express Lanes will be constructed to the inside of the general
purpose lanes and will directly connect to the Revive 285 project. This mobility
enhancing project would consist of:
• Two Express Lanes in each direction along SR 400 between I-285N and McGinnis
 Ferry Road.
• One Express Lane in each direction from McGinnis Ferry Road to McFarland Road.
Intermediate access points will be determined as additional coordination,
environmental documentation and design activities are completed on the corridor.
Estimated Costs*: $2.4 Billion

I-85 North Widening: Hamilton Mill to SR 211
This project would consist of:
• Widening I-85 from Hamilton Mill Road to SR 211 and addition of one general
 purpose lane in each direction.
• The length of widening is approximately 6.2 miles within Gwinnett and
 Barrow counties.
• The project also proposes a striping modification of the 14’ Express Lanes buffer
 to accommodate the third general purpose lane between I-985 to Hamilton
 Mill Road.
Estimated Costs*: $261 Million

I-85 North Widening: SR 211 to US 129
This project would consist of:
• Widening I-85 from SR 211 to US 129
• One additional general purpose lane in each direction. The length of widening is
 approximately 10.5 miles within Barrow and Jackson counties.
Estimated Costs*: $344 Million
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