AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: City reaches $38.75 million settlement in red light ticket lawsuit  (Read 996 times)

Brandon

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 9802
  • Mr. Accelerator is our friend; Mr. Brake is not.

  • Age: 41
  • Location: Joliet, IL
  • Last Login: November 13, 2018, 05:52:22 PM

Continuing the saga...

City reaches $38.75 million settlement in red light ticket lawsuit

Quote
Mayor Rahm Emanuel's administration has agreed to a $38.75 million settlement of a class-action lawsuit alleging Chicago failed to give adequate notice to red light camera and speed camera violators.

Under the massive deal, more than 1.2 million people could be in line for payments of half of whatever they paid the city for their tickets. Those who qualify will receive letters in the mail in upcoming months notifying them they were part of the suit and telling them how to collect, according to attorney Jacie Zolna, whose firm brought the legal challenge.

The March 2015 suit claimed the city violated its own rules by failing to send a second notice of a violation before guilt was determined, and by doubling the fine for late payment of tickets sooner than allowed.

Quote
Ald. Anthony Beale, 9th, who has railed against the red light and speed cameras, said the huge settlement underscores that the ticket programs are not about safety, but about "trying to balance the books on the backs of the people who can least afford to pay."

"What I can tell you is, 'I told you so,'" said Beale, City Council Transportation Committee chairman, when told of the settlement Thursday. "If you recall, years ago I said the whole red light camera issue was more about revenue than it was about public safety."

And...

Another black eye for Chicago's red light cameras: Drivers get millions

Quote
Over the years, however, Chicago's red light program has been engulfed in scandal. Tribune investigations of the program have found malfunctioning cameras and inconsistent enforcement.

•Drivers were issued millions of dollars in tickets even though city transportation officials knew that yellow light times were too short, falling below federal minimum guidelines.

•People were ticketed by speed cameras after the hours designated for ticketing in school and park "safety zones."

•In 2016, City Hall operative John Bills was sentenced to 10 years in prison for taking hundreds of thousands in bribes to help an Arizona company land tens of millions of dollars in red light camera contracts.

All of that has chipped away at the program's credibility.

Quote
So, what now for this troubled program?

In 2015, after a Tribune investigation revealed that thousands of drivers were being unfairly ticketed, we said: "Chicagoans have no reason to trust those cameras. If City Hall can't make them an honest safety tool, then yank them out."

In 2017, honest isn't a word we'd use for this program.

I'd say it's high time to ban the cameras due to the abuse.  Take away the toy.
Logged
"If you think this has a happy ending, you haven't been paying attention." - Ramsay Bolton

Illinois: America's own banana republic.

Screw the KSA; Stand with Canada.

Sykotyk

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 871
  • Last Login: April 29, 2018, 02:02:28 AM
Re: City reaches $38.75 million settlement in red light ticket lawsuit
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2017, 03:32:27 PM »

Anytime punishment or 'safety enforcement' is a means of financial income, the perils of corruption come in.

Privatized jails? Need more inmates for the state to pay for. Shadier judges, harsher punishments, etc.

Red light cameras? Set the yellow phases short to snare more people.

Speed limits? Make sure you devote your entire police force to catching speeders, who cares about the opioid epidemic or any other problem your small dot on the map has wrong.
Logged

Joe The Dragon

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 750
  • Location: 60016
  • Last Login: Today at 12:02:44 AM
Re: City reaches $38.75 million settlement in red light ticket lawsuit
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2017, 04:15:39 PM »

Anytime punishment or 'safety enforcement' is a means of financial income, the perils of corruption come in.

Privatized jails? Need more inmates for the state to pay for. Shadier judges, harsher punishments, etc.

and they sick people use the jail as there doctor they lose money.
Logged

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.