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Author Topic: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago  (Read 1775 times)

bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2018, 12:47:44 AM »

How about Merced area its has to be area in California that's going through dramatic in the past 15 years with the UC Merced Campus sparking some of its growth in the San Joaquin Valley.

Right now Merced's a bit too far to function as a Bay Area "bedroom community"; but that might change if the ACE commute RR line, now limited to San Jose-Stockton, establishes (this is currently in the discussion stage) a branch line southeast to Modesto, Turlock, and Merced (which would be the terminus) over the present UP line.  But with or without that service, Merced is becoming a warehouse/distribution center; the old Castle AFB immediately to the northwest is positioned to become an air freight hub, and it's centrally located within the portion of the Valley largely devoted to production of foodstuffs (as opposed to the cotton-heavy area SW of Fresno).  It's likely that the metro area, which includes Atwater and Livingston north along CA 99, will approach 400-500K population within the next ten years.  U.C. Merced is presently the fastest-growing campus (partially because it's largely the only one that can accommodate rapid growth) -- but has yet to establish a graduate specialty that nails down a unique identity for the campus (like Davis with agriculture, particularly wine & tomatoes, Riverside with citrus crops, and San Diego with biochemistry); if one is established and promoted in the near term, expect associated commercial ventures to locate nearby, sparking new employment and subsequent housing enhancement.       

But wait isn't High Speed Rail also at play in the Merced Area.
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bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #26 on: August 06, 2018, 12:54:01 AM »

https://www.sfgate.com/business/networth/article/Vallejo-s-Thomas-Kinkade-community-one-of-a-kind-3482389.php

Hiddenbrook in Solano County was once the fastest growing area in the county and it didn't exist 15 years ago. It serves Bay Area and its halfway between the Cordelia interchange and the CA-37 @ I-80 interchange. Hiddenbrook was a planned district in Solano County at the time it was built.

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sparker

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #27 on: August 06, 2018, 01:21:02 AM »

How about Merced area its has to be area in California that's going through dramatic in the past 15 years with the UC Merced Campus sparking some of its growth in the San Joaquin Valley.

Right now Merced's a bit too far to function as a Bay Area "bedroom community"; but that might change if the ACE commute RR line, now limited to San Jose-Stockton, establishes (this is currently in the discussion stage) a branch line southeast to Modesto, Turlock, and Merced (which would be the terminus) over the present UP line.  But with or without that service, Merced is becoming a warehouse/distribution center; the old Castle AFB immediately to the northwest is positioned to become an air freight hub, and it's centrally located within the portion of the Valley largely devoted to production of foodstuffs (as opposed to the cotton-heavy area SW of Fresno).  It's likely that the metro area, which includes Atwater and Livingston north along CA 99, will approach 400-500K population within the next ten years.  U.C. Merced is presently the fastest-growing campus (partially because it's largely the only one that can accommodate rapid growth) -- but has yet to establish a graduate specialty that nails down a unique identity for the campus (like Davis with agriculture, particularly wine & tomatoes, Riverside with citrus crops, and San Diego with biochemistry); if one is established and promoted in the near term, expect associated commercial ventures to locate nearby, sparking new employment and subsequent housing enhancement.       

But wait isn't High Speed Rail also at play in the Merced Area.

Even if HSR becomes a reality, Merced is along the Sacramento branch, which is in "Phase 2" of the development; the first line will turn west paralleling CA 152 and heading over Pacheco Pass en route to San Jose, where it's slated to merge with the existing Caltrain commute line into S.F.  The Chowchilla-Sacramento line won't be in operation until about 2032-35 at the earliest.   Merced, along with Turlock, Modesto, Manteca, and Stockton will just be stations along that line; it's not anticipated that one served community will benefit over any other.  That being said -- if a station is located adjacent to the UCM campus (which is likely considering the projected HSR alignment in the area), that might enhance the campus' attraction to students from adjacent areas who would rather not commute by car -- provided the cost of doing so could be contained. 
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Sctvhound

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #28 on: August 06, 2018, 01:24:48 AM »

Charleston, SC has a load of areas which are unrecognizable from 10 years ago. The entire Boeing plant (right next to the airport) did not exist 10 years ago. It was just a bunch of trees on I-526. Now almost 7,000 people work there.

The major Nexton development (creating a new exit on I-26) is also brand new. Was just trees less than 10 years ago.

Several hundred acres of homes on James Island (my home area) have also been developed.
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busman_49

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #29 on: August 06, 2018, 08:17:50 AM »

I-71 at the Polaris Parkway interchange, from 1998-2018.  One would hardly recognize the area with all of the construction done in that amount of time, along with the addition of the Gemini Place exit.

bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #30 on: August 06, 2018, 11:54:42 AM »

What about Palmdale, Lancaster and Inland Empire that has been discussed as the fastest growing areas of Southern California for the past two decades and has been compared to the Socal version of Stockton, Modesto and Tracy.
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bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2018, 12:01:18 PM »


Murrieta and Temecula according to American Roads was one of the cities that's getting fast growth in Southern California in the past 15 years at the 8:00 mark.

It's been cited as a Bedroom Community of San Diego and Los Angeles according to this video. In other words its basically the Socal Version of Solano County.

Solano County in Northern California has been mentioned as the bedroom community for Sacramento and San Francisco.
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doorknob60

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #32 on: August 06, 2018, 01:43:14 PM »

Much of the Eagle Rd/ID-55 corridor in Meridian, ID. It used to be a semi-rural highway connecting I-84 to Eagle, bypassing most of the (much smaller) Meridian. Now, it has become the primary focus of development in the city, including a giant shopping center (The Village). There is still farmland directly across from The Village, I'm surprised it's still there. I don't see it lasting much longer.

2007:


2016:


Even just looking at the road itself, in that time, it's got a median across the entire length to Chinden and an extra northbound lane for a segment of it (another southbound lane is really needed). Surprisingly, the 55 MPH speed limit north of Fairview, and 50 MPH south of Fairview, is still in place. And I imagine 10 years ago, congestion wasn't too terrible. Now, it's very bad.

Nanis

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #33 on: August 06, 2018, 08:17:07 PM »

Many parts of Philadelphia were wastelands as late as 10 years ago. An example is Fishtown. Go back around 25 years and NoLibs would be unrecogniseable. Just a barrel on fire and emptiness. Same with Frankford, which used to look really nice in the 90s. The suburbs back then were mostly farmland.
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Map of state roads I have taken pictures for the signs for can be seen here (although four routes ave not been added yet because of their lengths.):
https://www.scribblemaps.com/maps/view/us_route_map/s7vYO7rC80

bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #34 on: August 07, 2018, 12:43:42 AM »

https://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/2017/02/portland_gentrification_4_real.html

Yes according to this article Portland is the Most gentrified city in Oregon. But Also in this article Sacramento and Long Beach were mentioned on this list.
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sparker

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #35 on: August 07, 2018, 03:12:36 AM »

What about Palmdale, Lancaster and Inland Empire that has been discussed as the fastest growing areas of Southern California for the past two decades and has been compared to the Socal version of Stockton, Modesto and Tracy.

The growth rate of Palmdale and Lancaster has slowed from its 1990's peak; corruption and the relocation of gang-related activity to the area from the L.A. basin put a damper on the double-digit (in terms of percentage) yearly growth in the 80's and early '90's.  Things have settled down a bit since then and growth has resumed -- largely thanks to the Metrolink rail connection (Lancaster is the outer terminus of that particular line's service).  The region, generally defined as the L.A. county portion of the "high desert", stands at about 500K population right now, pretty evenly divided between incorporated Palmdale, Lancaster, and the unincorporated county territory surrounding those cities. 

The "Inland Empire" spills over Cajon Pass into San Bernardino County's high desert (my old "stomping grounds"), consisting of Hesperia, Victorville, Apple Valley, and Adelanto -- all incorporated cities, with a combined (incorporated and surrounding unincorporated) population of about 750K.  During the '00's housing boom, Adelanto, the most recently incorporated of the cities, was the last place to feature a median housing price under $200K;  while mostly recovered from the 2008-11 fiasco; housing prices in the region still lag well behind those "over the hill" in areas closer to metro L.A. -- the "classic" Inland Empire.  Nevertheless, development and population increase is moving at a faster pace than Palmdale/Lancaster over in L.A. County; it should exceed 1M by about 2023 or so, according to most projections I've seen. 


Murrieta and Temecula according to American Roads was one of the cities that's getting fast growth in Southern California in the past 15 years at the 8:00 mark.

It's been cited as a Bedroom Community of San Diego and Los Angeles according to this video. In other words its basically the Socal Version of Solano County.

Solano County in Northern California has been mentioned as the bedroom community for Sacramento and San Francisco.

Indeed, Temecula (and, to a lesser degree, Murietta) is situated in a geographical position to serve as an exurb of both L.A. (particularly in regard to the Inland Empire segment of that metro region) and San Diego.  What's interesting is that it defies the usual dictum that states the farther away one gets from a particular metro center, the lower the housing cost should be -- Temecula features some of the priciest housing in Riverside County!  Of course, part of that is that it's also considered a "destination" city, as it's the heart of SoCal's principal "wine country", with vineyards dotting the east side of town.  OTOH, Murietta, just to the north at the 15/215 southern split, is a bit more economical in regards to housing; it's essentially the farthest afield L.A./Inland Empire exurb considered even remotely affordable.  But traffic in the area has hindered Murietta from being more than simply an incidental San Diego "bedroom town"; the commute from there to the San Diego employment centers north of town often stretches to nearly two hours each direction (similar to the Tracy/Manteca commute to the Bay Area -- but with jobs that, on the average, pay considerably less).  The incentive just isn't there for commuters to slog the 50-60 miles to San Diego; whereas the 30-odd miles to the Inland Empire is "doable", according to the commute figures on I-15 in the area. 
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jakeroot

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #36 on: August 07, 2018, 05:47:09 AM »

The Brentwood Town Centre area of Burnaby, BC has really taken off in the last 15 years. At the turn of the century, there were a couple of tall buildings, but nothing to write home about. Now, there's a bunch of skyscrapers, some which rival the Vancouver skyline in terms of height. The Metrotown area of Burnaby, to the south, has always been known for mid-rise residential skyscrapers, but North Burnaby never was. That's changed! The area is at the heart of a large master-planned "Amazing Brentwood" complex which is revitalizing the formerly-garbage Brentwood Mall.

Here's a skyline shot of Brentwood in the foreground (with Metrotown in the background -- plenty of new buildings there too). Nothing amazing, but most of the skyscrapers in the foreground are from the last 15 years. There's several not pictured here either. Surrey and Langley, as a whole, have grown faster just in terms of population, but it's not so obvious because it's all low-density.

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bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #37 on: August 07, 2018, 11:33:32 AM »

https://www.businessinsider.com/us-census-data-population-decrease-shows-american-cities-in-decline-2018-1

Here are some of the cities in the USA that are in decline due to economic changes.

Youngstown,OH
Pittsburgh, PA
St. Louis, MO

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-09-10/coal-s-decline-is-choking-appalachia-towns

And some coal mining towns are in decline.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2018, 11:35:34 AM by bing101 »
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webny99

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #38 on: August 07, 2018, 12:37:59 PM »

Lakeville, MN, a southern fringe suburb of MSP ... Dakota County four-laning what had been a rural farm road..

See: the OP.  :clap:
I linked to one example above, but I'm sure there's others. Not sure exactly which one you're referring to.

bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #39 on: August 09, 2018, 11:22:59 PM »

Another point on San Francisco the Financial District would be unrecognized today due to Salesforce Tower and Newer skyscrapers taking over older buildings like 76 Clock Tower in San Francisco also there are newer buildings like Salesforce and it has covered up the TransAmerica Building from its view when you see the skyline today.

Also Candlestick Park has been demolished due to 49ers moving to Santa Clara.

For Sacramento on the other hand you have the Golden One Center it took over the Downtown Malls spot. And yes Downtown Sacramento was in the process of being gentrified in 2014-2016 timeframe to attract more Superpac workers and Lobbyists to downtown though.

West Sacramento was in the process of Building new apartment complexes near Tower Bridge Parkway when I last looked plus adding a green lane for bikes at one point though.
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sparker

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #40 on: August 10, 2018, 12:31:21 PM »

The southern portion of the east shore of San Francisco Bay, part of the cities of Milpitas, Fremont, and Newark, is becoming more and more developed -- mostly office parks and small retail areas in support -- as "spillover" from the so-called "Silicon Valley" tech area.  Of course, that earlier phenomenon started well inland between Palo Alto and Santa Clara, centered on the (appropriately) Central Expressway; but as land became scarcer, major development moved north and east to the area bounded by US 101, I-880, and CA 237 -- and even north of 237, edging up against the wetlands at the south end of the bay.  Now, it's turned north up the other side for much the same reason -- available land.  That will likely eventually extend to somewhere around Union City; north of there previous development extending south from Oakland and Alameda extends all the way out to the salt flats; there's simply no more room.  Even though it's been a housing-dominated area for some time, the next "big thing" in regional corporate tech development is down the US 101 corridor through Morgan Hill to Gilroy -- and some predict all the way to Hollister.  But one more thing may affect the patterns -- taking into consideration the ever-increasing commuter traffic to the north San Joaquin Valley, as I've mentioned previously, some companies -- particularly those engaging in software development where a computer station suffices as a workplace -- have started to open branch offices in such outlying areas as Tracy and Stockton to not only help their employees avoid the 2+ hour commute but also increase productivity among those folks by relieving the stress of the commute.  But a couple of companies whose activities require more than a simple workstation environment have taken a more measured approach to this issue by opening offices in the "Amador Valley" (Pleasanton/Livermore); still requiring a commute, but not quite as lengthy -- while still maintaining some level of centralized control over their operations, particularly when physical goods movement is concerned. 

   
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bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #41 on: August 10, 2018, 02:15:50 PM »

https://www.solanoedc.org/key-industries/biotech-biomedical

Solano County has now released a statement on the biotech industry in the county. Yes Solano County has been named as an alternative biotech hub to South San Francisco and  Mission Bay in San Francisco. Plus its to attract college students in the Sacramento Valley to work in a growing industry without going all the way to San Francisco and South City.

http://biotechsystem.ucdavis.edu/about_us.html

Yes and UC Davis has issued similar statements on attracting the Biotech industry away from the Bay Area.

https://www.dailyrepublic.com/all-dr-news/solano-news/solano-business/local-business-columnists/economic-notes-life-sciences-companies-show-interest-in-solano/

Note the jury is still out on how biotech will boost growth in Solano County and the Sacramento Valley in the next 10 years though and how much it will divert traffic away from the Bay Area is yet to be determined given these talks. But this argument does bolster the idea that Sacramento's growth and Bay Area Sprawl is merging in Solano County.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2018, 02:39:38 PM by bing101 »
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MantyMadTown

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #42 on: August 10, 2018, 05:13:08 PM »

The southern portion of the east shore of San Francisco Bay, part of the cities of Milpitas, Fremont, and Newark, is becoming more and more developed -- mostly office parks and small retail areas in support -- as "spillover" from the so-called "Silicon Valley" tech area.  Of course, that earlier phenomenon started well inland between Palo Alto and Santa Clara, centered on the (appropriately) Central Expressway; but as land became scarcer, major development moved north and east to the area bounded by US 101, I-880, and CA 237 -- and even north of 237, edging up against the wetlands at the south end of the bay.  Now, it's turned north up the other side for much the same reason -- available land.  That will likely eventually extend to somewhere around Union City; north of there previous development extending south from Oakland and Alameda extends all the way out to the salt flats; there's simply no more room.  Even though it's been a housing-dominated area for some time, the next "big thing" in regional corporate tech development is down the US 101 corridor through Morgan Hill to Gilroy -- and some predict all the way to Hollister.  But one more thing may affect the patterns -- taking into consideration the ever-increasing commuter traffic to the north San Joaquin Valley, as I've mentioned previously, some companies -- particularly those engaging in software development where a computer station suffices as a workplace -- have started to open branch offices in such outlying areas as Tracy and Stockton to not only help their employees avoid the 2+ hour commute but also increase productivity among those folks by relieving the stress of the commute.  But a couple of companies whose activities require more than a simple workstation environment have taken a more measured approach to this issue by opening offices in the "Amador Valley" (Pleasanton/Livermore); still requiring a commute, but not quite as lengthy -- while still maintaining some level of centralized control over their operations, particularly when physical goods movement is concerned. 

 

I like that they're building stuff out there in the eastern part of the Bay Area and even over in Stockton. I heard that the coast is very unaffordable and it's a hassle to get to the core cities now as commuters are moving farther out to have an affordable place to live.

I wonder if the two developments (the one originating in Oakland and the other one from San Jose) are going to merge. By that time there won't be a separate South Bay and East Bay anymore!



https://www.solanoedc.org/key-industries/biotech-biomedical

Solano County has now released a statement on the biotech industry in the county. Yes Solano County has been named as an alternative biotech hub to South San Francisco and  Mission Bay in San Francisco. Plus its to attract college students in the Sacramento Valley to work in a growing industry without going all the way to San Francisco and South City.

http://biotechsystem.ucdavis.edu/about_us.html

Yes and UC Davis has issued similar statements on attracting the Biotech industry away from the Bay Area.

https://www.dailyrepublic.com/all-dr-news/solano-news/solano-business/local-business-columnists/economic-notes-life-sciences-companies-show-interest-in-solano/

Note the jury is still out on how biotech will boost growth in Solano County and the Sacramento Valley in the next 10 years though and how much it will divert traffic away from the Bay Area is yet to be determined given these talks. But this argument does bolster the idea that Sacramento's growth and Bay Area Sprawl is merging in Solano County.

I would still consider Solano County part of the Bay Area. It's part of the North Bay but it's still part of the Bay Area. Unless San Francisco doesn't really want it to be considered part of the Bay Area but I wouldn't know because I'm not from there and I've only been to San Francisco once. Never asked anyone there about Vallejo, Fairfield, or Vacaville.
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bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #43 on: August 10, 2018, 06:37:35 PM »

The southern portion of the east shore of San Francisco Bay, part of the cities of Milpitas, Fremont, and Newark, is becoming more and more developed -- mostly office parks and small retail areas in support -- as "spillover" from the so-called "Silicon Valley" tech area.  Of course, that earlier phenomenon started well inland between Palo Alto and Santa Clara, centered on the (appropriately) Central Expressway; but as land became scarcer, major development moved north and east to the area bounded by US 101, I-880, and CA 237 -- and even north of 237, edging up against the wetlands at the south end of the bay.  Now, it's turned north up the other side for much the same reason -- available land.  That will likely eventually extend to somewhere around Union City; north of there previous development extending south from Oakland and Alameda extends all the way out to the salt flats; there's simply no more room.  Even though it's been a housing-dominated area for some time, the next "big thing" in regional corporate tech development is down the US 101 corridor through Morgan Hill to Gilroy -- and some predict all the way to Hollister.  But one more thing may affect the patterns -- taking into consideration the ever-increasing commuter traffic to the north San Joaquin Valley, as I've mentioned previously, some companies -- particularly those engaging in software development where a computer station suffices as a workplace -- have started to open branch offices in such outlying areas as Tracy and Stockton to not only help their employees avoid the 2+ hour commute but also increase productivity among those folks by relieving the stress of the commute.  But a couple of companies whose activities require more than a simple workstation environment have taken a more measured approach to this issue by opening offices in the "Amador Valley" (Pleasanton/Livermore); still requiring a commute, but not quite as lengthy -- while still maintaining some level of centralized control over their operations, particularly when physical goods movement is concerned. 

 

I like that they're building stuff out there in the eastern part of the Bay Area and even over in Stockton. I heard that the coast is very unaffordable and it's a hassle to get to the core cities now as commuters are moving farther out to have an affordable place to live.

I wonder if the two developments (the one originating in Oakland and the other one from San Jose) are going to merge. By that time there won't be a separate South Bay and East Bay anymore!



https://www.solanoedc.org/key-industries/biotech-biomedical

Solano County has now released a statement on the biotech industry in the county. Yes Solano County has been named as an alternative biotech hub to South San Francisco and  Mission Bay in San Francisco. Plus its to attract college students in the Sacramento Valley to work in a growing industry without going all the way to San Francisco and South City.

http://biotechsystem.ucdavis.edu/about_us.html

Yes and UC Davis has issued similar statements on attracting the Biotech industry away from the Bay Area.

https://www.dailyrepublic.com/all-dr-news/solano-news/solano-business/local-business-columnists/economic-notes-life-sciences-companies-show-interest-in-solano/

Note the jury is still out on how biotech will boost growth in Solano County and the Sacramento Valley in the next 10 years though and how much it will divert traffic away from the Bay Area is yet to be determined given these talks. But this argument does bolster the idea that Sacramento's growth and Bay Area Sprawl is merging in Solano County.

I would still consider Solano County part of the Bay Area. It's part of the North Bay but it's still part of the Bay Area. Unless San Francisco doesn't really want it to be considered part of the Bay Area but I wouldn't know because I'm not from there and I've only been to San Francisco once. Never asked anyone there about Vallejo, Fairfield, or Vacaville.

I'm from Solano County. I'm aware that some cities like Dixon and Vacaville are mentioned as part of the Sacramento Valley when I watch Local News and Vallejo and Benicia are counted as part of the North Bay. And also you see both San Francisco and Sacramento media outlets split Solano County into two parts if you see the Nielsen map. Yes technically Solano is a Bay Area county but sometimes when you bring up certain issues like splitting up California into different parts Solano County is mentioned to be more aligned to Sacramento.
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sparker

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #44 on: August 11, 2018, 03:36:36 PM »

About 30-odd years back I had almost this very discussion with a friend who was a born-and-raised San Franciscan but who eventually found a good job out in Vacaville and moved there -- and the consensus from his Vacaville cohorts and friends was that the Bay Area extended through Fairfield, but the little "cove" along I-80 between Fairfield & Vacaville served as the dividing area; they considered Vacaville part of the Sacramento Valley -- but, of course, right at the "borderline".  South of there, the back end of Travis AFB -- and a line running south to the Suisun Bay from there would have been the extension of the invisible "border".  Even today, it seems as good a defining point as any else. 
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MantyMadTown

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #45 on: August 11, 2018, 03:41:52 PM »

Hm, didn't know that Solano County was split in two between the Bay Area and Sacramento.
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bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #46 on: August 11, 2018, 05:22:21 PM »

https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/city-beat/article216455975.html


Sacramento's Capital Mall District is in talks to get gentrified.




Quote
Sacramento’s Capitol Mall is about to get its first significant housing structure. But some city officials think the plans aren’t bold enough for the city’s grandest thoroughfare.
San Francisco-based Shorenstein Properties submitted plans to the city this week to construct an eight-story residential building at 601 Capitol Mall, replacing a parking lot next to the U.S. Bank Tower.
The structure – with a planned 162 units – would be the largest residential building on Capitol Mall. But at 83 feet at its highest point, it would be dwarfed by nearby high-rise office towers.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2018, 05:25:13 PM by bing101 »
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bing101

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #47 on: August 12, 2018, 12:34:51 AM »

What about Central New Jersey my understanding on this area that New Jersey gets talked about as carrying the Suburbs of Philadelphia and New York. Do they get dramatic changes due to the city propers being gentrified.

What about parts of Maryland I understand that some areas are residential communities of both Baltimore and Washington D.C. due to their halfway location. How much growth or dramatic changes are they getting given that they are halfway from the propers of these places.
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sparker

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #48 on: August 12, 2018, 12:40:53 AM »

Hm, didn't know that Solano County was split in two between the Bay Area and Sacramento.

Not a formal "split" by any means; we're talking attitudes and perception here -- including self-perception by the residents of a particular town or area.  Solano County takes in a hell of a lot of area -- from Vallejo all the way to the outskirts of Davis; the former is definitely considered part of the Bay Area, being sited on one arm of the bay itself, while the farthest northeast town, Dixon, is seeing considerable housing development as a Sacramento exurb. 
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MantyMadTown

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Re: Areas that would have been unrecognizable 10 years ago
« Reply #49 on: August 12, 2018, 01:02:03 AM »

Hm, didn't know that Solano County was split in two between the Bay Area and Sacramento.

Not a formal "split" by any means; we're talking attitudes and perception here -- including self-perception by the residents of a particular town or area.  Solano County takes in a hell of a lot of area -- from Vallejo all the way to the outskirts of Davis; the former is definitely considered part of the Bay Area, being sited on one arm of the bay itself, while the farthest northeast town, Dixon, is seeing considerable housing development as a Sacramento exurb.

Yeah I knew it was gradual, because I don't think there's any areas where it suddenly changes from one metro to another.
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