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Author Topic: Quebec's Highways  (Read 121195 times)

AsphaltPlanet

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Re: Quebec's Highways
« Reply #425 on: June 30, 2019, 07:33:10 AM »

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webfil

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Re: Quebec's Highways
« Reply #426 on: July 01, 2019, 02:50:28 PM »

I had thought that the story of the 10/15/20 interchange was as simple as: autoroute along riverbank needs interchange with bridge with high clearance over seaway = funky interchange.   The 20/25 interchange would be similar, except the bridge involved doesn't need to be as high.
Double trumpet is also relatively easily tolled.
[/quote]
The toll booths were located on the other side of the bridge.
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Stephane Dumas

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Re: Quebec's Highways
« Reply #427 on: July 01, 2019, 08:13:36 PM »

I had thought that the story of the 10/15/20 interchange was as simple as: autoroute along riverbank needs interchange with bridge with high clearance over seaway = funky interchange.   The 20/25 interchange would be similar, except the bridge involved doesn't need to be as high.
Double trumpet is also relatively easily tolled.
The toll booths were located on the other side of the bridge.
[/quote]

I remember, the toll booths was on Ile-des-Soeurs.

I saw this old topo map showing Champlain bridge before A-10/A-15/A-20. http://numerique.banq.qc.ca/patrimoine/details/52327/2245355
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Stephane Dumas

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Re: Quebec's Highways
« Reply #428 on: July 03, 2019, 01:20:34 PM »

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J N Winkler

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Re: Quebec's Highways
« Reply #429 on: July 11, 2019, 05:22:38 PM »

I have a couple of things to report regarding Transports Québec signing documentation.

*  I have more or less lost access to advertised construction contracts through SEAO, owing to software upgrades on their end.  As I explained in this thread about five years ago, SEAO requires an (expensive) pay subscription to download documents without DRM, but uses FileOpen DRM to allow registered non-subscribers to open and view (not print, save, or extract) contract documents in PDF up to five times per document.  This is accomplished through a FileOpen client that bolts onto Acrobat; when the user opens a document, the client sends a hash to the server over the Internet and gets back a key that is used to decrypt the file.  There is a 3,000-line Python script, ineptpdf.py or ineptpdf.pyw, that duplicates the functionality of the client but can be run at the command line and allows the file to be saved without encryption.  I used it in combination with other PDF tools to build a collection of just under 3,000 MTQ signing sheets.  However, when I went back to SEAO earlier this month, I discovered that it had implemented HTTPS with HTST, and neither ineptpdf.pyw nor the FileOpen client I had had since 2014 would decrypt downloaded PDF files.  I was able to get them to open in Acrobat by upgrading to the current version of the FileOpen client, but active development of ineptpdf.pyw seems to have come to an end around 2012.  I suspect the underlying issue is that neither it nor the old FileOpen client could handle HTST, and the fix may be as simple as updating the script to use a newer Python library with HTST support, but I cannot rule out the underlying encryption having been strengthened.  For the time being I can do without access to MTQ contracts since SEAO archives in arrears and the pattern for signing contracts in recent years has been structural work only (no sign panels furnished or installed, therefore no sign panel detail sheets), but tracking down the ineptpdf.pyw developers is on my to-do list.

*  For at least a decade (I first found it in 2007, IIRC), MTQ has made renderings of standard traffic signs available for free download through a satellite of its main website.  The server name used to be something like "mtqsignalisation" but the facility has been branded as the Répertoire des dispositifs de signalisation routière du Québec (RSR) since about 2013.  The website appears to be a front end for a database where each sign has a five-digit index number.  Renderings are available for each index number in up to seven formats--PDF (called devis, consisting of a dimensioned drawing similar to a page in Standard Highway Signs), BMP, DXF, EPS, AI, PNG, and JPEG.  I wrote and have had a successful first run of a script to download all of the available renderings and file them by index number.  Some statistics are as follows:  2276 distinct index numbers;  index number range 12392 to 35259; 3 hours 18 minutes to finish full download over a relatively fast residential cable connection; 14,727 total files downloaded; 2.07 GB aggregate filesize; 1916 PDFs downloaded; 1910 PDFs with unique filenames (some index numbers have no corresponding PDF, while the same devis is used for multiple index numbers, such as the ones corresponding to various values for speed limit on the speed limit sign); 4645 total PDF pages of sign drawings.  The script also has the ability to be run in "incrementing" mode, where renderings are downloaded only if the corresponding index numbers have not previously been encountered.  I plan to monitor the RSR from now on to verify that index numbers are persistent (i.e., a given sign keeps the same index number) and determine the extent to which existing index numbers accumulate new renderings as time passes.  The RSR is updated biannually; new signs are added beginning January 1 and July 1, and are kept in the nouveautés section for up to three months.
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"It is necessary to spend a hundred lire now to save a thousand lire later."--Piero Puricelli, explaining the need for a first-class road system to Benito Mussolini

Dr Frankenstein

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Re: Quebec's Highways
« Reply #430 on: July 14, 2019, 12:27:58 AM »

*  I have more or less lost access to advertised construction contracts through SEAO, owing to software upgrades on their end.  As I explained in this thread about five years ago, SEAO requires an (expensive) pay subscription to download documents without DRM, but uses FileOpen DRM to allow registered non-subscribers to open and view (not print, save, or extract) contract documents in PDF up to five times per document.  This is accomplished through a FileOpen client that bolts onto Acrobat; when the user opens a document, the client sends a hash to the server over the Internet and gets back a key that is used to decrypt the file.  There is a 3,000-line Python script, ineptpdf.py or ineptpdf.pyw, that duplicates the functionality of the client but can be run at the command line and allows the file to be saved without encryption.  I used it in combination with other PDF tools to build a collection of just under 3,000 MTQ signing sheets.  However, when I went back to SEAO earlier this month, I discovered that it had implemented HTTPS with HTST, and neither ineptpdf.pyw nor the FileOpen client I had had since 2014 would decrypt downloaded PDF files.  I was able to get them to open in Acrobat by upgrading to the current version of the FileOpen client, but active development of ineptpdf.pyw seems to have come to an end around 2012.  I suspect the underlying issue is that neither it nor the old FileOpen client could handle HTST, and the fix may be as simple as updating the script to use a newer Python library with HTST support, but I cannot rule out the underlying encryption having been strengthened.  For the time being I can do without access to MTQ contracts since SEAO archives in arrears and the pattern for signing contracts in recent years has been structural work only (no sign panels furnished or installed, therefore no sign panel detail sheets), but tracking down the ineptpdf.pyw developers is on my to-do list.
That's a shame. I was relying on a similar method to crack those those documents, but I haven't used it in a while.

*  For at least a decade (I first found it in 2007, IIRC), MTQ has made renderings of standard traffic signs available for free download through a satellite of its main website.  The server name used to be something like "mtqsignalisation" but the facility has been branded as the Répertoire des dispositifs de signalisation routière du Québec (RSR) since about 2013.  The website appears to be a front end for a database where each sign has a five-digit index number.  Renderings are available for each index number in up to seven formats--PDF (called devis, consisting of a dimensioned drawing similar to a page in Standard Highway Signs), BMP, DXF, EPS, AI, PNG, and JPEG.  I wrote and have had a successful first run of a script to download all of the available renderings and file them by index number.  Some statistics are as follows:  2276 distinct index numbers;  index number range 12392 to 35259; 3 hours 18 minutes to finish full download over a relatively fast residential cable connection; 14,727 total files downloaded; 2.07 GB aggregate filesize; 1916 PDFs downloaded; 1910 PDFs with unique filenames (some index numbers have no corresponding PDF, while the same devis is used for multiple index numbers, such as the ones corresponding to various values for speed limit on the speed limit sign); 4645 total PDF pages of sign drawings.  The script also has the ability to be run in "incrementing" mode, where renderings are downloaded only if the corresponding index numbers have not previously been encountered.  I plan to monitor the RSR from now on to verify that index numbers are persistent (i.e., a given sign keeps the same index number) and determine the extent to which existing index numbers accumulate new renderings as time passes.  The RSR is updated biannually; new signs are added beginning January 1 and July 1, and are kept in the nouveautés section for up to three months.
Now that's very interesting... especially since the download UI on that site is very clunky.
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J N Winkler

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Re: Quebec's Highways
« Reply #431 on: July 14, 2019, 01:06:07 PM »

That's a shame. I was relying on a similar method to crack those those documents, but I haven't used it in a while.

Alongside looking for the ineptpdf.pyw developers, I've been toying with the idea of delving into the code to see how hard it would be to retrofit HTST support.  It would be ideal if that automatically fell out of updating a Web library, and it may really be that easy--I just don't know.  I'm not giving up in any case, since I hate to lose existing capability.

Now that's very interesting... especially since the download UI on that site is very clunky.

It is possible to speed things up a little by choosing 100 signs per page and detail view (not "petit vignette" view, the default).  But I didn't want to try adding all 2276 signs to "shopping cart" and then download--that's just asking for server error, in my view--and it's tedious to subdivide.  Also, the order in which the signs are listed in default view is random, and changes with each fresh load of the Accueil page.

I thought it would save effort in the long run to keep track of index numbers, so I ended up writing a subroutine that basically does a complete download by adding a different sign to the shopping cart, downloading, and then emptying the cart (rinse and repeat 2276 times).

It turned out to be less painful than I was expecting.  The postdata your browser sends to the server as a given sign is added to "Mes dispositifs" reflects the renderings that are actually available for it.  However, the server doesn't validate this part of the postdata.  This allowed me to use fake postdata implying all seven kinds of renderings were available for all 2276 signs, which saved processing steps.

I did have the server expire my cookie midway through a full download, but that was easily fixed by using a test for no ZIP downloaded as a trigger to visit the Accueil page again to force a new session.
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"It is necessary to spend a hundred lire now to save a thousand lire later."--Piero Puricelli, explaining the need for a first-class road system to Benito Mussolini

 


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