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Author Topic: Obstinacy of GPS navigation  (Read 1089 times)

vdeane

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Re: Obstinacy of GPS navigation
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2019, 09:15:31 PM »

But then there are weird exceptions, like the aversion to I-180. I guess the difference is, any trip involving I-180 is going to have non-freeway segments all over the place anyways, so what's 15 more miles of two-lane if it will save five minutes? Unlike Rochester to Montreal, where it's much more clear cut: Either all freeway, or else 2/3 freeway and 1/3 on backroads. No switching back and forth.
I can understand doing that with to/from the south, and getting to I-180 requires either a jog on I-80 or going through Northumberland at present.  What I don't understand is why it also does that for trips to/from the east.
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Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

michravera

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Re: Obstinacy of GPS navigation
« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2019, 02:36:12 AM »

Two-way turn ("suicide") lanes are marked with broken lines on the insides in California. How does the book say they should be striped?

↓  As shown below  ↓

Quote from: Vehicle Code, Division 11. Rules of the Road
ARTICLE 3. Offenses Relating to Traffic Devices

21460.

(a) The Department of Transportation and local authorities in their respective jurisdictions may designate a two-way left-turn lane on a highway. A two-way left-turn lane is a lane near the center of the highway set aside for use by vehicles making left turns in both directions from or into the highway.

(b) Two-way left-turn lanes shall be designated by distinctive roadway markings consisting of parallel double yellow lines, interior line dashed and exterior line solid, on each side of the lane. The Department of Transportation may determine and prescribe standards and specifications governing length, width, and positioning of the distinctive pavement markings. All pavement markings designating a two-way left-turn lane shall conform to the Department of Transportationís standards and specifications.

(c) A vehicle shall not be driven in a designated two-way left-turn lane except when preparing for or making a left turn from or into a highway or when preparing for or making a U-turn when otherwise permitted by law, and shall not be driven in that lane for more than 200 feet while preparing for and making the turn or while preparing to merge into the adjacent lanes of travel. A left turn or U-turn shall not be made from any other lane where a two-way left-turn lane has been designated.

(d) This section does not prohibit driving across a two-way left-turn lane.

(e) Raised pavement markers may be used to simulate the painted lines described in this section when those markers are placed in accordance with standards established by the Department of Transportation.
So, the CVC says to mark them precisely as most of them in California are marked.
In California, double-double solid lines (separated by at least 12", I believe) form an artificial barrier and may not be crossed except at breaks. It's supposed to be like there is a dividing block. If this isn't the practice elsewhere, Google needs to get with the local practice. Single-double lines may be crossed except to overtake (usually to turn into a driveway).
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Brandon

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Re: Obstinacy of GPS navigation
« Reply #27 on: September 02, 2019, 07:41:24 AM »

Two-way turn ("suicide") lanes are marked with broken lines on the insides in California. How does the book say they should be striped?

↓  As shown below  ↓

Quote from: Vehicle Code, Division 11. Rules of the Road
ARTICLE 3. Offenses Relating to Traffic Devices

21460.

(a) The Department of Transportation and local authorities in their respective jurisdictions may designate a two-way left-turn lane on a highway. A two-way left-turn lane is a lane near the center of the highway set aside for use by vehicles making left turns in both directions from or into the highway.

(b) Two-way left-turn lanes shall be designated by distinctive roadway markings consisting of parallel double yellow lines, interior line dashed and exterior line solid, on each side of the lane. The Department of Transportation may determine and prescribe standards and specifications governing length, width, and positioning of the distinctive pavement markings. All pavement markings designating a two-way left-turn lane shall conform to the Department of Transportation’s standards and specifications.

(c) A vehicle shall not be driven in a designated two-way left-turn lane except when preparing for or making a left turn from or into a highway or when preparing for or making a U-turn when otherwise permitted by law, and shall not be driven in that lane for more than 200 feet while preparing for and making the turn or while preparing to merge into the adjacent lanes of travel. A left turn or U-turn shall not be made from any other lane where a two-way left-turn lane has been designated.

(d) This section does not prohibit driving across a two-way left-turn lane.

(e) Raised pavement markers may be used to simulate the painted lines described in this section when those markers are placed in accordance with standards established by the Department of Transportation.
So, the CVC says to mark them precisely as most of them in California are marked.
In California, double-double solid lines (separated by at least 12", I believe) form an artificial barrier and may not be crossed except at breaks. It's supposed to be like there is a dividing block. If this isn't the practice elsewhere, Google needs to get with the local practice. Single-double lines may be crossed except to overtake (usually to turn into a driveway).

The problem with Google is that they take local, California, practice and extend it across the country for their map routings, leading to oddball routings that make no sense in a state like Illinois:  https://www.google.com/maps/dir/4+Bonnie+Lane,+Yorkville,+IL/2551+North+Bridge+Street,+Yorkville,+IL/@41.6475427,-88.4788526,13z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m13!4m12!1m5!1m1!1s0x880eeae1474d1443:0xe39e20776a76388a!2m2!1d-88.4443443!2d41.6144525!1m5!1m1!1s0x880ee98151435819:0x274bc8b967035cda!2m2!1d-88.4448553!2d41.6750831
Due to this: https://goo.gl/maps/jKSgeBv8X4grXZpf9

At the other end, instead of simply making the left at Cannonball, they do the same weird shit again.

To contrast, here's the Bing Maps routing: https://binged.it/30S0I6H
It goes straight, point to point, and turns you left (in accordance with local practice) out of Bonnie Lane.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2019, 07:45:47 AM by Brandon »
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hbelkins

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Re: Obstinacy of GPS navigation
« Reply #28 on: September 02, 2019, 12:44:41 PM »

I prefer sticking to the interstate even if the shorter more direct route is also faster. Safety is more important to me than distance or time.

I don't necessarily think interstates are safer. High-speed traffic in multiple lanes, with people jockeying for the same open space, and a greater percentage of big trucks, can make for some gnarly wrecks.

When I'm driving, I sometimes prefer taking 5-10 more minutes to save a couple miles.

I'm the opposite. I prefer to save time and will typically take a longer route if it's faster, and I want to be at a specific place at a specific time.
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webny99

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Re: Obstinacy of GPS navigation
« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2019, 08:01:42 PM »

I prefer sticking to the interstate even if the shorter more direct route is also faster. Safety is more important to me than distance or time.

I don't necessarily think interstates are safer. High-speed traffic in multiple lanes, with people jockeying for the same open space, and a greater percentage of big trucks, can make for some gnarly wrecks.

They're certainly safer. Accidents can and do happen, but at least they're built to high standards, are more consistent than backroads, and most importantly there's no oncoming or cross traffic. I think almost anyone would prefer to be on an interstate for a long distance trip.
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ilpt4u

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Re: Obstinacy of GPS navigation
« Reply #30 on: September 02, 2019, 09:04:24 PM »

I think almost anyone would prefer to be on an interstate for a long distance trip.
I prefer an airplane for a long trip

That said, those middle-distance (~3-7 hr drive) trips, depends if Travel Time is my primary concern.

I get sick of Flatland Interstates in the Midwest after a few hours on them - almost sleep-inducing. The change of pace on rural non-interstate highways, be them 2 or 4 lane, gives the variety of open roads along the farm houses and corn fields and change of pace and scenery in the various towns. I tend to prefer that, assuming it doesnít add much beyond 1 hour to the drive.
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