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Author Topic: Disney Attractions  (Read 1623 times)

1995hoo

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Re: Disney Attractions
« Reply #50 on: October 13, 2019, 03:07:43 PM »

BTW, this escalator discussion reminds me that the aquarium in Baltimore used to have (and may still have—I haven't visited it in over 20 years due to the ticket prices) "flat escalators" across the open central area connecting the different levels. Essentially, they were like the moving walkways you often see at airports that use standard escalator-style "steps" and handrails but are a flat layout rather than "moving stairs," but unlike the airport type these had a noticeable, though very gentle, slope to them in order to convey people between different levels. I remember my mom said she hated those "flat escalators," but I don't know why. I do recall my brother and I thought they were neat, probably because they were different from the type we'd see at the shopping mall or the museums downtown.
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Re: Disney Attractions
« Reply #51 on: October 13, 2019, 03:46:06 PM »

BTW, this escalator discussion reminds me that the aquarium in Baltimore used to have (and may still have—I haven't visited it in over 20 years due to the ticket prices) "flat escalators" across the open central area connecting the different levels. Essentially, they were like the moving walkways you often see at airports that use standard escalator-style "steps" and handrails but are a flat layout rather than "moving stairs," but unlike the airport type these had a noticeable, though very gentle, slope to them in order to convey people between different levels. I remember my mom said she hated those "flat escalators," but I don't know why. I do recall my brother and I thought they were neat, probably because they were different from the type we'd see at the shopping mall or the museums downtown.

The IKEA in Conshohocken (suburban Philadelphia—adjacent to IKEA’s North American headquarters) has such an inclined conveyor connecting the checkout on the ground level with the underground parking garage below. In fact, the carts’ rubber wheels are specially grooved to interlock with the grooves on the conveyor treads and prevent the carts from rolling.
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Re: Disney Attractions
« Reply #52 on: October 13, 2019, 06:51:57 PM »

BTW, this escalator discussion reminds me that the aquarium in Baltimore used to have (and may still have—I haven't visited it in over 20 years due to the ticket prices) "flat escalators" across the open central area connecting the different levels. Essentially, they were like the moving walkways you often see at airports that use standard escalator-style "steps" and handrails but are a flat layout rather than "moving stairs," but unlike the airport type these had a noticeable, though very gentle, slope to them in order to convey people between different levels. I remember my mom said she hated those "flat escalators," but I don't know why. I do recall my brother and I thought they were neat, probably because they were different from the type we'd see at the shopping mall or the museums downtown.

The only place I've ever seen this was in Disney World, where you used these "inclined moving walkways" to get up to the Tomorrowland transit ride. Pretty sure there was also one in the exit from Space Mountain.
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roadman65

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Re: Disney Attractions
« Reply #53 on: October 13, 2019, 07:36:12 PM »

I heard that the Carousel Of Progress and Its A Small World were attractions at the 64 Fair where Flushing Meadows Park is now located near Citi Field in NY.

I remember that carousel in Anaheim as it was a theatre that had five auditoriums and after each show the theatre would move around the stage from one show to the other.  At the end the last auditorium would have a speedramp where the stage is and take people up one level to a model of Disney's planned Experimental Prototype City of Tomorrow.  Now since it got moved to Disney World it has five shows as the speedwalk to the second level is not present there like it was in California.


The Epcot model is still in the upper level of a structure in Disney World's Magic Kingdom, maybe above Carousel of Progress, but it can only be seen very briefly from the Tomorowland Transit Authority Peoplemover.  They really should move the model to One Man's Journey so you can see it longer.
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Also to note Disney is the only place to not use moving stairs as the speedwalk is a conveyor type of lift that never really took off.  I did here though the original Erie PATH Station in Jersey City, NJ used one to take people from the subway to the above ground station that Erie abandoned once they merged with Delaware Lackawana to form Erie-Lackawana Railway and made Hoboken their main terminal.  However that I think was concurrent with Disneyland in the late 50's and early 60's so that was Goodyear's only other known use for the Speedwalk that I know of.   Too bad it is a great escalator as you can take a wheelchair and stroller on no problem.

There were also Speedways in Downtown Tacoma (Escalades) and the Washington State Ferry Terminal in Seattle.  The fact that they persist at Disney is perfect for the "future that never was" theming they tried to use to avoid the future always catching up with them.

Flat moving sidewalks persist at airports.  Just the other day I saw a Speedway at the Metrotown Real Canadian Super Store near Vancouver, for moving shopping carts down to the parking garage.  When the customer places the cart on the ramp, the wheels lock so it won't roll down the ramp.
Orlando International Airport uses escalator stairs for flat moving sidewalks.  You would figure the belt is more better as less moving parts and can be maintained easier.
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Re: Disney Attractions
« Reply #54 on: October 14, 2019, 06:23:41 AM »

Orlando International Airport uses escalator stairs for flat moving sidewalks.  You would figure the belt is more better as less moving parts and can be maintained easier.
2 reasons:
1) interchangeability of parts with stepped escalators
2) easier to replace a broken step than a broken bit of a continuous belt (which would have to be the whole thing).
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