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Author Topic: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)  (Read 2914 times)

webny99

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #75 on: April 11, 2020, 10:02:38 PM »

Here's a link to what I think is an incredibly cool interactive map that shows you the self-response rates to the 2020 census right down to the census tract.    I find this type of thing fascinating, like how response rates are highest in the suburbs, low in urban areas, and lowest in areas with poor internet.
But maybe it's just me!  :meh: :coffee:
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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #76 on: April 11, 2020, 11:57:29 PM »

Fauxcahontas would probably approve.

Anyone using that word illustrates their ignorance of the state of Oklahoma.

She might be a native of Oklahoma, but 1/1,024 DNA doesn't lie.

It's not relevant. In Oklahoma, pretty much everyone whose family has been here for more than a few generations is told that they have some degree of Native American blood. Your great-grandpa on your dad's side married into this tribe, or a cousin on your mom's side was this other tribe. If a tribal member left the tribe and integrated into white society in the 19th century, and didn't appear on the Dawes rolls, one would have no way of knowing if they had any degree of Indian blood at all. So it became a plausible lie, and if your mother or your grandfather or whichever wannabe family geneologist told you in the 1960s that you were Indian when there was no such thing as DNA testing or Ancestry.com, what are you going to do, call them out on it? How would you know? Where would you even get a copy of the Dawes rolls with no Internet?

Thousands upon thousands of Oklahomans believe they are Native American to this day, with no proof. They probably aren't, but they were raised to believe that.

It's no different than the people in this thread having a grandma that swears up and down they're Italian, but they take a DNA test and, surprise, they're Scottish.
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Roadgeekteen

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #77 on: April 12, 2020, 12:54:29 AM »

I put "European but in retrospect, I should have left that blank. What does it matter in the greater scheme of things, meaning legislative redistricting?

Due to having Indian ancestry, my brother checked "Native American" in either the 2000 or 2010 Census. Fauxcahontas would probably approve.
A girl I know has like 1/16 native blood and I told her she wasn't Native American and she swore she was. I asked her what tribe she was part of, she didn't know  :pan:
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cabiness42

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #78 on: April 12, 2020, 09:24:51 AM »

One thing we're starting to confuse here is the difference between ethnic heritage on a standard form like a Census form and qualifications for Native American tribe membership.  There is no actual law that dictates a minimum percentage in order to claim general Native American ethnicity on a Census form, as opposed to Native American tribes which require you to prove a certain percentage of ancestry, usually 25% but less for others, to be able to identify yourself as a member of that tribe.
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J N Winkler

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #79 on: April 12, 2020, 12:51:30 PM »

It's also worth noting that in the past, the Census did not tabulate self-reported ethnicity.  Instead, it asked each person the birthplaces (state or foreign country) of himself or herself and his or her parents, as well as his or her native language at birth if this was not English.  For some of my Scottish ancestors, the relevant line on the enumeration sheet goes "Scotland - Scotland - Scotland - Scotch."

I have also been a little surprised at how easy it is to avoid being counted.  For example, over the past week or so, I have been tracing a great-granduncle who was born in coal miners' rows in Bothwell, Lanarkshire, Scotland, in December 1881.  He appears in the 1900 census (aged 18) in Pennsylvania, the 1920 census (aged 38) in Texas (as a farm hand for a family who gave their native language as Spanish), and the 1940 census (aged 58), also in Texas.  The 1910 census has no 100% good match for him, but it does have just two name matches of his approximate age reporting parents' birth in Scotland.  One was a quarryman in King County, Washington, reporting arrival in the US in 1907 (my relative arrived in 1882 or 1883 and reported the latter as his arrival date on other censuses).  The other was a farm laborer in Chambers County, Texas, with Virginia given as his birthplace, but both parents from Scotland.  I suspect the latter is my relative (he was in Chambers County, albeit in a different justice precinct, in 1918 when he had to fill out a draft card), and the enumerator made a transcription error because the very next line is for someone with Scotland as his birthplace and Massachusetts as the birthplace of both parents.  For 1930 I have yet to find any close matches.
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webny99

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #80 on: April 15, 2020, 04:19:15 PM »

The national response rate has slowly been ticking up, and is currently at 49.1%.

There are only 6 states that have not hit a 40% response rate yet:
Alaska (no surprises there), Maine, Vermont, West Virginia, Wyoming, and New Mexico.
And no states have hit 60%, although Minnesota is closest at 58.8%.

https://2020census.gov/en/response-rates.html#
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webny99

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #81 on: May 07, 2020, 12:04:39 PM »

The national response rate has ticked up to 57%, and there are only 7 states that are still below 50%. Any guesses which 7?
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webny99

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Re: 2020 Census
« Reply #82 on: June 09, 2020, 09:47:42 AM »

Amidst everything else going on, the 2020 census is ticking along. The national response rate currently stands at 60.7%
Only 3 states have not hit 50% yet: West Virginia, New Mexico, and Alaska (no surprises there).

Here's a chart of the 2010 and 2020 response rates for each state, sorted by the difference between the two. No state has surpassed their 2010 response rate yet, but Michigan is closest, followed by Washington. Both are likely to surpass their 2010 response rate this month, if current trends hold.

StateCurrent 2020 Rate  Final 2010 Rate  Difference
Michigan   67.3   67.7   0.4
Washington    66.0   67.2   1.2
Kentucky   64.3   65.7   1.4
Nevada   59.9   61.4   1.5
Virginia   65.9   69.0   3.1
Ohio   65.8   69.0   3.2
Oregon   63.5   66.9   3.4
Minnesota   70.4   74.1   3.7
Alabama   58.7   62.5   3.8
Colorado   63.3   67.2   3.9
Indiana   65.5   69.6   4.1
Nebraska   66.9   71.1   4.2
Idaho   62.9   67.1   4.2
Arizona   57.1   61.3   4.2
Utah   64.3   68.6   4.3
Maryland      65.1   69.5   4.4
New Jersey   62.9   67.6   4.7
Illinois   65.8   70.5   4.7
Florida   58.2   63.0   4.8
New Hampshire   59.5   64.4   4.9
Delaware   59.1   64.1   5.0
Connecticut   64.5   69.5   5.0
Kansas   64.7   70.0   5.3
Mississippi   55.9   61.3   5.4
Iowa   67.4   73.0   5.6
Georgia   56.9   62.5   5.6
Wisconsin   67.8   73.5   5.7
Massachusetts   62.9   68.8   5.9
Louisiana   55.0   61.0   6.0
Tennessee   60.8   67.1   6.3
California   61.9   68.2   6.3
Pennsylvania   63.8   70.2   6.4
Missouri   60.9   67.5   6.6
Maine   50.8   57.4   6.6
Rhode Island   58.9   65.7   6.8
South Dakota   60.2   67.1   6.9
Arkansas   55.4   62.3   6.9
North Carolina   57.1   64.8   7.7
Oklahoma   54.3   62.3   8.0
Hawaii   55.6   64.1   8.5
New York   56.0   64.6   8.6
Vermont   51.5   60.3   8.8
Texas   55.5   64.4   8.9
North Dakota   59.7   68.8   9.1
South Carolina   55.5   64.7   9.2
West Virginia   48.2   59.1   10.9
New Mexico   48.4   60.0   11.6
Wyoming   50.7   63.4   12.7
Montana   51.7   64.6   12.9
Alaska   41.5   55.6   14.1
« Last Edit: June 09, 2020, 09:54:20 AM by webny99 »
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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #83 on: June 09, 2020, 10:00:33 AM »

How is the response rate determined if you don't know what the population is?
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jeffandnicole

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #84 on: June 09, 2020, 10:19:18 AM »

How is the response rate determined if you don't know what the population is?

They're not the same.  The response rate is based on the number of censuses sent out.  If 100 are sent, and 60 are received, the rate is 60%.  If the population is only 80, or 120, the response rate is still 60%.  Further surveys and in-person visits will determine the true population.
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cabiness42

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #85 on: June 09, 2020, 10:39:05 AM »

How is the response rate determined if you don't know what the population is?

They're not the same.  The response rate is based on the number of censuses sent out.  If 100 are sent, and 60 are received, the rate is 60%.  If the population is only 80, or 120, the response rate is still 60%.  Further surveys and in-person visits will determine the true population.

To be a little bit more specific, before census forms are mailed out, there is an operation called Address Canvassing in which employees literally canvas the country to update address lists. That produces a universe of households to be counted. The response rate is the percentage of those households that have responded, regardless of the numbers of people.
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hbelkins

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #86 on: June 09, 2020, 04:43:30 PM »

If you're like me, and get your mail at a post office box and not via home delivery, you won't get a mailed form. I didn't realize that until I started hearing of people getting their forms and I hadn't received one. I filled my form out online upon hearing that. I don't remember how I responded 10 years ago.
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cabiness42

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #87 on: June 09, 2020, 05:38:50 PM »

If you're like me, and get your mail at a post office box and not via home delivery, you won't get a mailed form. I didn't realize that until I started hearing of people getting their forms and I hadn't received one. I filled my form out online upon hearing that. I don't remember how I responded 10 years ago.

If you live in an area of any size that doesn't have home mail delivery, your area should be identified as one where forms are hand delivered. If it's only a small area that doesn't get home delivery or you just choose not to, you would have to respond online, by phone, or wait for an enumerator to visit you.
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hbelkins

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Re: So I got my 2020 census form (and am still waiting for my 2000 form)
« Reply #88 on: June 10, 2020, 03:29:57 PM »

If you're like me, and get your mail at a post office box and not via home delivery, you won't get a mailed form. I didn't realize that until I started hearing of people getting their forms and I hadn't received one. I filled my form out online upon hearing that. I don't remember how I responded 10 years ago.

If you live in an area of any size that doesn't have home mail delivery, your area should be identified as one where forms are hand delivered. If it's only a small area that doesn't get home delivery or you just choose not to, you would have to respond online, by phone, or wait for an enumerator to visit you.

Rural mail delivery is available here, but we've never had it. My dad always got his mail at the county seat post office (incidentally, door-to-door delivery isn't available there) and he never installed a mailbox by the road. He was probably apprehensive about mail theft. When we moved back here, we lived in the city limits and thus needed a PO box (we inherited the one my grandmother and cousin, the house's previous occupants, had used). When we moved to the place where I grew up after my dad's death, we never bothered putting up a rural box. I'm guessing that mail theft is an even bigger problem these days than it used to be.
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