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Author Topic: Taking better photos ( advice)  (Read 714 times)

roadman65

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Taking better photos ( advice)
« on: December 19, 2022, 08:02:32 AM »

https://www.flickr.com/photos/54480415@N08/52525205514/in/dateposted-public/

Took this picture going through Cottonwood, CA in July 21. I managed to get this even with the semi in the photo. I have found semis do get in the way, but something we live with as we do have to sate the roads with commerce as well as other cars.   However, I did manage well here ( at least I think) to pace myself far back to be able to capture the two road signs here that would have been hidden if I just drove normally.


My question is did I do well enough under the circumstances?
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Re: Taking better photos ( advice)
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2022, 07:36:18 PM »

Well enough for what?
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: Taking better photos ( advice)
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2022, 07:58:57 PM »

Speaking from experience many of the rural freeways in California have signs to the right lanes and not an overhead gantry.  The best way to capture images on those stretches is just to camp in the right lane as you are approaching exits. 

I guess to more adequately answer your question, what exactly are you trying to photograph?  I dont see anything inherently wrong with the photo you took.
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formulanone

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Re: Taking better photos ( advice)
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2022, 07:59:27 PM »

If you want the nearer I-5 sign in focus, you'll have to use 1/500 second (or faster) for exposure time for highway speeds. You can get away with something a little slower at speeds under 35mph, but I wouldn't go with too much slower unless it's a more distant object. A sign bridge that's 0.2 mile away doesn't need as fast a shutter speed as a closer-up reassurance sign at 300-500 feet away.

If you want the defroster vent lines to disappear, you'll have to use a circular polarizer on your lens. From a quick search, the Nikon D3500 kit lenses use either the 52-55-58mm diameters. Best $40-50 you'll ever spend on your camera (other than another battery). Usually the lens cap has a number stamped with an on the inside of it.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2022, 08:05:57 PM by formulanone »
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: Taking better photos ( advice)
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2022, 08:10:05 PM »

If you want the nearer I-5 sign in focus, you'll have to use 1/500 second (or faster) for exposure time for highway speeds. You can get away with something a little slower at speeds under 35mph, but I wouldn't go with too much slower unless it's a more distant object. A sign bridge that's 0.2 mile away doesn't need as fast a shutter speed as a closer-up reassurance sign at 300-500 feet away.

If you want the defroster vent lines to disappear, you'll have to use a circular polarizer on your lens. From a quick search, the Nikon D3500 kit lenses use either the 52-55-58mm diameters. Best $40-50 you'll ever spend on your camera (other than another battery). Usually the lens cap has a number stamped with an on the inside of it.

My solution for that is a set of $3 dollar black pillow sheets from Walmart.  Just throw those in your travel bag, iron at a hotel and theyll easily eliminate 90-95% of windshield glare in a rental car.
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Scott5114

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Re: Taking better photos ( advice)
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2022, 05:57:27 PM »

If you want the nearer I-5 sign in focus, you'll have to use 1/500 second (or faster) for exposure time for highway speeds. You can get away with something a little slower at speeds under 35mph, but I wouldn't go with too much slower unless it's a more distant object. A sign bridge that's 0.2 mile away doesn't need as fast a shutter speed as a closer-up reassurance sign at 300-500 feet away.

If you want the defroster vent lines to disappear, you'll have to use a circular polarizer on your lens. From a quick search, the Nikon D3500 kit lenses use either the 52-55-58mm diameters. Best $40-50 you'll ever spend on your camera (other than another battery). Usually the lens cap has a number stamped with an on the inside of it.

My solution for that is a set of $3 dollar black pillow sheets from Walmart.  Just throw those in your travel bag, iron at a hotel and theyll easily eliminate 90-95% of windshield glare in a rental car.

I tried using black felt when I was really into road photography and it was no use; I just ended up with the texture of the fabric glaring off the windshield instead. Plus it was a huge pain to keep the cloth in place on the dash.

A polarizer seems like an intriguing solution to the problem.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: Taking better photos ( advice)
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2022, 06:21:25 PM »

If you want the nearer I-5 sign in focus, you'll have to use 1/500 second (or faster) for exposure time for highway speeds. You can get away with something a little slower at speeds under 35mph, but I wouldn't go with too much slower unless it's a more distant object. A sign bridge that's 0.2 mile away doesn't need as fast a shutter speed as a closer-up reassurance sign at 300-500 feet away.

If you want the defroster vent lines to disappear, you'll have to use a circular polarizer on your lens. From a quick search, the Nikon D3500 kit lenses use either the 52-55-58mm diameters. Best $40-50 you'll ever spend on your camera (other than another battery). Usually the lens cap has a number stamped with an on the inside of it.

My solution for that is a set of $3 dollar black pillow sheets from Walmart.  Just throw those in your travel bag, iron at a hotel and theyll easily eliminate 90-95% of windshield glare in a rental car.

I tried using black felt when I was really into road photography and it was no use; I just ended up with the texture of the fabric glaring off the windshield instead. Plus it was a huge pain to keep the cloth in place on the dash.

A polarizer seems like an intriguing solution to the problem.

What Ive found is that I have to get a nice sweet flat spot on the dashboard.  Once I hit it getting a good photo with the vent glare gone is easy.  My Impreza has a somewhat ornate instrumentation cluster which makes this challenging something, the Challenger and Forester are much easier due their flatness. 

Worth noting, I use a iPhone 11.  Too much zoom makes for blurry signage photos, up to 1.3 magnification seems to the furthest I can take things without problems.  I go up to 1.5-1.7 if Im not taking photos of signage. 

The really tricky thing with the black cloth in the Impreza is getting the placement right.  If I get too much vent covered the cloth will flap all over with the defroster on.  Too close to the wheel and the cloth will potentially slide back on uphill grades.  Tape doesnt do me any good given it tends to bunch up the smooth surface I ironed. 

One thing that is worth mentioning is that no matter how good you are at taking road photos they likely will still not come out completely perfect.  I always post edit my photo stock to minimize/crop out any artifacts from the image.  I also usually two shot bursts for non-signage photos and three shots for photos with signage.  Ill go through after and pick the best images out of the bursts I like, the rest get deleted. 

As of late Ive been using natural shade cover when the terrain provides it to me.  Objects like the side of a hill and a row of trees tend to yield the best lighting results.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2022, 06:41:03 PM by Max Rockatansky »
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AsphaltPlanet

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Re: Taking better photos ( advice)
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2022, 10:28:11 PM »

Quote from: Scott5114 link=topic=32625.msg2799744#msg2799744
I tried using black felt when I was really into road photography and it was no use; I just ended up with the texture of the fabric glaring off the windshield instead. Plus it was a huge pain to keep the cloth in place on the dash.

A polarizer seems like an intriguing solution to the problem.

The biggest problem with polarizers that I have found is that they eat about a stop or so of light. So while they are great at reducing reflections they come at a shutter speed or ISO penalty.
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froggie

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Re: Taking better photos ( advice)
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2022, 10:32:52 PM »

If you want the nearer I-5 sign in focus, you'll have to use 1/500 second (or faster) for exposure time for highway speeds. You can get away with something a little slower at speeds under 35mph, but I wouldn't go with too much slower unless it's a more distant object. A sign bridge that's 0.2 mile away doesn't need as fast a shutter speed as a closer-up reassurance sign at 300-500 feet away.

If you want the defroster vent lines to disappear, you'll have to use a circular polarizer on your lens. From a quick search, the Nikon D3500 kit lenses use either the 52-55-58mm diameters. Best $40-50 you'll ever spend on your camera (other than another battery). Usually the lens cap has a number stamped with an on the inside of it.

My solution for that is a set of $3 dollar black pillow sheets from Walmart.  Just throw those in your travel bag, iron at a hotel and theyll easily eliminate 90-95% of windshield glare in a rental car.

I tried using black felt when I was really into road photography and it was no use; I just ended up with the texture of the fabric glaring off the windshield instead. Plus it was a huge pain to keep the cloth in place on the dash.

My experience is somewhat different.  When I'm serious about road photography these days, I'll use a black towel, which does cut down on the windshield glare.  The byproduct I've come across, though, is it tends to highlight nicks, scrapes, and pockmarks in the windshield itself.
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dgolub

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Re: Taking better photos ( advice)
« Reply #9 on: December 24, 2022, 08:27:02 AM »

The best way to capture images on those stretches is just to camp in the right lane as you are approaching exits. 

This.  Not too much that you can do about the truck other than passing it, but do it in an area that you don't care about so that you don't miss anything while passing.
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