Is there a set standard on lane striping

Started by roadman65, April 04, 2024, 03:20:32 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

roadman65

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53526558652_7b6ff5fcbc_k.jpg



Was noticing the way Oregon spaces the two yellow lines along a portion of US 101. It seems wider than the rest.

Doesn't the MUTCD dictate the spacing?
Every day is a winding road, you just got to get used to it.

Sheryl Crowe


freebrickproductions

#1
I've seen Mississippi, Texas, and Arkansas space their double yellows like that as well. IMHO, it makes a bit more sense when you see it transition like this followed by this, as it keeps the solid and broken yellow lines (and cats-eyes) in a consistent position. I do prefer the thinner (more standard?) spacing states like Alabama uses on the double-yellow lines though.
It's all fun & games until someone summons Cthulhu and brings about the end of the world.

I also collect traffic lights, road signs, fans, and railroad crossing equipment.

(They/Them)

Big John

That example allows for the depressed reflector without the paint interfering with it.

1995hoo

I remember in the late 1970s, a portion of NC-12 on Hatteras Island had a double yellow line with a broken yellow line in between. It was pretty clear that at one time there had been a two-way passing zone and that when they decided to prohibit passing, rather than removing the old striping or simply painting over it, they painted one solid line on each side of the existing lines.

I don't have any photos, of course. That was the film camera era, and I would have been riding in the back seat anyway.
"You know, you never have a guaranteed spot until you have a spot guaranteed."
—Olaf Kolzig, as quoted in the Washington Times on March 28, 2003,
commenting on the Capitals clinching a playoff spot.

"That sounded stupid, didn't it?"
—Kolzig, to the same reporter a few seconds later.

michravera

Quote from: roadman65 on April 04, 2024, 03:20:32 PMhttps://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53526558652_7b6ff5fcbc_k.jpg



Was noticing the way Oregon spaces the two yellow lines along a portion of US 101. It seems wider than the rest.

Doesn't the MUTCD dictate the spacing?


I don't know about Oregon, but, in California, if the solid lines are 12" or more apart, it becomes a median and therefore, not only no passing zone, but also a "no crossing even to exit" zone.

Rothman

Quote from: michravera on April 05, 2024, 07:48:10 PM
Quote from: roadman65 on April 04, 2024, 03:20:32 PMhttps://live.staticflickr.com/65535/53526558652_7b6ff5fcbc_k.jpg



Was noticing the way Oregon spaces the two yellow lines along a portion of US 101. It seems wider than the rest.

Doesn't the MUTCD dictate the spacing?


I don't know about Oregon, but, in California, if the solid lines are 12" or more apart, it becomes a median and therefore, not only no passing zone, but also a "no crossing even to exit" zone.


*stops car and measures gap with ruler*

Huh.  Guess I can't cross here.

*angry honking behind him*
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Revive 755

The 11th Edition of the MUTCD has the following:

Quote from: MUTCD 11th Edition 3A.04 Paragraph 03To be recognized as a double line rather than two separate, disassociated single lines, the discernible space separating the parallel lines of a double line should not exceed two times the line width of a single line.

The 2009 MUTCD only had a requirement for a "discernible space" (3A.06 Paragraph 02 Item C).

The exact spacing seems to vary by state, and sometimes by the district in the state.

paulthemapguy

Striping standards usually abide by state standards as the most critical governing doctrine. That's the way it works in Illinois and the USA, anyway.  I have almost exclusively fallen back on IDOT standards (especially standard drawings) when enforcing striping contracts at work.

This is the latest compilation of all of IDOT's systemwide standard drawings; skip to page 346 for pavement markings and to page 349 for reflectors: https://public.powerdms.com/IDOT/documents/2677373
Obviously this won't apply to the state where the original photo was taken, but this is an example of how guidelines might be organized or enforced. And like Revive755 said above, these systemwide standards are further complicated by subdivisions of a state (districts) who want to do their own thing.
Avatar is the last interesting highway I clinched.
My website! http://www.paulacrossamerica.com Now featuring all of Ohio!
My USA Shield Gallery https://flic.kr/s/aHsmHwJRZk
TM Clinches https://bit.ly/2UwRs4O

National collection status: 385/425. Only 40 route markers remain!

epzik8

I think I've seen the "Oregon way" in a few construction zones in Maryland and Pennsylvania, i.e. not in normal circumstances.
From the land of red, white, yellow and black.
____________________________

My clinched highways: http://tm.teresco.org/user/?u=epzik8
My clinched counties: http://mob-rule.com/user-gifs/USA/epzik8.gif



Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.