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Author Topic: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas  (Read 37656 times)

formulanone

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #50 on: February 22, 2013, 11:46:39 AM »

Unless you generate extra power (through turbocharging), diesels are generally slower than their petrol equivalents; the added torque doesn't matter if you're giving up 50% of the power. But enthusiasts aside, a diesel will give back more fuel mileage, but as long as fuel costs keep at the levels they're at (with diesel being more expensive), then hybrids are going to be more popular choices. The one thing a hybrid motor with electrical-stop/start battery-generation power can do, that others can't (save fully-electric cars) is not run its engine at all during a full stop or at very slow speeds.

Diesels have slightly higher maintenance costs, although in the long-run, hybrid battery and electrical motor costs will surpass lots of maintenance costs, since those aren't serviceable items. The anecdotal stories about them (or really any make/model) living forever are biased by the enjoyment, pride, or attitudes the owners have towards keeping and maintaining them.

Do a search for Ford F250 diesels and see what pops up...for every proud owner, there's plenty of stories filled with smoke and woe.

cpzilliacus

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #51 on: February 22, 2013, 12:44:35 PM »

I do wonder why more US research in diesel motors has been neglected, especially given the anecdotal consensus that diesel motors run "forever".

<conspiracy>because they want you to buy a new car every 100,000 miles.</conspiracy>

As I think I mentioned upthread, my truck has about 296,000 miles on the meter.  Aside from changing the oil and filters, I have never done anything to the engine.

Others with similar trucks (including Dodge with the Cummins engine and Chevy/GMC with the Isuzu Duramax)  have told me that 500,000 miles or more is not unreasonable if the engine is maintained correctly.  Fun conversations near the Diesel pumps while filling up.
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cpzilliacus

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #52 on: February 22, 2013, 12:56:12 PM »

I do wonder why more US research in diesel motors has been neglected, especially given the anecdotal consensus that diesel motors run "forever".

<conspiracy>because they want you to buy a new car every 100,000 miles.</conspiracy>

1. Diesels are perceived as heavy duty engines for big rigs.

Correct.  Also exotic.

Quote
2. The bad experience of the GM diesels of the 1970s-1980s that did not work properly.

Correct.  Those GM Diesel cars stranded people when the engines suffered their catastrophic failures, which is one reason why the  memories linger even decades after the last of them went to the junkyard.

Quote
3. Diesels are also perceived in small cars as the realm of either europhiles (Jetta, Golf) or hippies who make fuel out of vegetable oil.

Fair comment.

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4. Let's be honest, it does get colder in the US and Canada overall than in most of Europe.  Who wants to gel?

I must disagree with that.  Diesel automobiles, SUVs and pickup trucks are popular in all of Finland and Sweden, where the winters get plenty cold (I don't think I have seen a gasoline-powered taxicab there in at least 20 years). 

Biggest issue during the winter is starting the engine in the morning - but it's a non issue in most places, because there are outlets for plugging-in the engine block warmers near many parking spaces (and most Diesel and gasoline-powered cars there have block warmers, which also reduces vehicle emissions, since it warms to the correct operating temperature much more quickly).

Quote
That pretty much sums it up with the GM diesels leaving the worst impression overall.

I think GM deserves most of the blame. 

But when people drive a modern Diesel car, I think many people come away impressed.
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cpzilliacus

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #53 on: February 22, 2013, 01:02:21 PM »

Unless you generate extra power (through turbocharging), diesels are generally slower than their petrol equivalents; the added torque doesn't matter if you're giving up 50% of the power. But enthusiasts aside, a diesel will give back more fuel mileage, but as long as fuel costs keep at the levels they're at (with diesel being more expensive), then hybrids are going to be more popular choices. The one thing a hybrid motor with electrical-stop/start battery-generation power can do, that others can't (save fully-electric cars) is not run its engine at all during a full stop or at very slow speeds.

And the hybrid probably has to keep the internal combustion motor running in the winter to provide heat for the passenger cabin.

Quote
Diesels have slightly higher maintenance costs, although in the long-run, hybrid battery and electrical motor costs will surpass lots of maintenance costs, since those aren't serviceable items. The anecdotal stories about them (or really any make/model) living forever are biased by the enjoyment, pride, or attitudes the owners have towards keeping and maintaining them.

Have the hybrids been on the road long enough to have run-up enough miles to need the entire battery pack replaced?

Quote
Do a search for Ford F250 diesels and see what pops up...for every proud owner, there's plenty of stories filled with smoke and woe.

Two problems that I am aware of:

(1) The 6.0L engine, which it came out, was extremely trouble-prone.  That's not the engine that Ford is using in new trucks now.

(2) The automatic transmissions were not designed for the enormous amount of torque put out by the Diesel engines, and were pretty failure-prone (a non-issue for me, as I have a standard transmission).  But here again, I understand  that Dearborn is using a much more robust automatic today in the F250/F350 and other Diesel trucks.
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agentsteel53

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #54 on: February 22, 2013, 01:16:22 PM »

As I think I mentioned upthread, my truck has about 296,000 miles on the meter.  Aside from changing the oil and filters, I have never done anything to the engine.

 :wow:

I'm used to my gasoline engines having all kinds of small things needing maintenance, like spark plugs, and various gaskets which leak oil.

the spark plugs are not something found on diesel engines - but don't you have gasket breakdowns over the years?  also, stuff like timing belt/water pump?  (okay, maybe not timing belt, but doesn't a diesel engine have a cooling system similar to that of a gasoline engine?)
« Last Edit: February 22, 2013, 01:19:18 PM by agentsteel53 »
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formulanone

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #55 on: February 22, 2013, 01:19:02 PM »

Have the hybrids been on the road long enough to have run-up enough miles to need the entire battery pack replaced?

Probably not that many; I know Honda and Toyota warranty the hybrid equipment (starter, rechargeable batteries, motor-generators, power transfer computers) for 8 years/100,000 miles. I've seen a number of them be "goodwilled" by factory warranty and the dealers if they kept up the maintenance after the fact. That's typically for those who exceeded the warranty by a short distance, but still "under the time limit" (or vice versa), but not by an extra hundred-thousand miles.

The battery packs have come down in price compared to when they first arrived on the scene, when they were about $5000 each; they're still about $2-3k. That's the price of a typical cylinder-head gasket job on an average (non-luxury/non-performance) car.

Still, diesels get the short-shrift attitude in America, but supposedly VW is going to provide a few models (the Golf TDi, for one) to these shores soon enough. Slower than a GTi, but quicker and more nimble than a petrol Golf/Rabbit. The eventual pricing is what will matter a lot.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2013, 01:24:50 PM by formulanone »
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Truvelo

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #56 on: February 22, 2013, 01:30:13 PM »

Diesel gelling is a bit of a misnomer. Fuel here has an anti-gelling additive added during the winter. During the last few winters temperatures have got down to well below -10c (14F) and the only difference when starting the engine is waiting a few seconds for the glow plug light to go out.
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kphoger

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #57 on: February 22, 2013, 05:09:57 PM »

I'd rather drive a gasoline truck than a diesel truck in the cold winter anyway.  Gelling up is no fun.

I have never had a problem with Diesel fuel gelling up in the winter (about the coldest ambient temperature I have experienced with my truck is about -10F (-23C)).

I used to drive Isuzu cab-over box trucks in southern Illinois, and our 2003 model year truck had a nasty habit of gelling up in the coldest weather.  The first (and not the only) time it happened to me was on I-55 near Litchfield, ILa good 140 miles from the warehouse, not including any of the stops I still had to make; that truck's usual driver complained about the same problem.  Interestingly, our 2001 and 2002 model year trucks didn't have the same problem (though they did have their own respective problems...).
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cpzilliacus

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #58 on: February 22, 2013, 07:07:38 PM »

As I think I mentioned upthread, my truck has about 296,000 miles on the meter.  Aside from changing the oil and filters, I have never done anything to the engine.

 :wow:

I'm used to my gasoline engines having all kinds of small things needing maintenance, like spark plugs, and various gaskets which leak oil.

Never had an oil leak.  Yes, it has gaskets.  So far, have never needed a new one.

the spark plugs are not something found on diesel engines - but don't you have gasket breakdowns over the years?  also, stuff like timing belt/water pump?  (okay, maybe not timing belt, but doesn't a diesel engine have a cooling system similar to that of a gasoline engine?)

No spark plugs - compression ignition.

There's a timing chain, no belt. I think that chain lasts as long as the engine does.

Water pump, yes. And that did wear-out, as I observed a little bit of engine coolant leaking from the bearings (I replaced it at about 275,000 miles).
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djsinco

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #59 on: February 22, 2013, 07:16:12 PM »

Diesel gelling is a bit of a misnomer. Fuel here has an anti-gelling additive added during the winter. During the last few winters temperatures have got down to well below -10c (14F) and the only difference when starting the engine is waiting a few seconds for the glow plug light to go out.

Perhaps in the UK it is a misnomer, but you almost never experience the winter temperatures like we do here in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, etc. The fact is, that in temperatures under about 10 degrees, any contaminants (water, condensation, residue in the fuel tank, filter, or any other part of the fuel system will occlude. This causes return fuel pressure to drop, which in turn causes fuel in the tank to become susceptible to "gelling." Obviously, not everyone who tries to drive in such temperatures will experience such an issue. Combine sub-zero (Fahrenheit) temperatures with any of the above, become stranded 50 miles from the nearest town in a blizzard, and then tell me it is a "misnomer." There are lots of preventative steps which one can take, but in the end buying bad fuel can trump all the preventative measures available.
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cpzilliacus

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #60 on: February 22, 2013, 07:20:32 PM »

Diesel gelling is a bit of a misnomer. Fuel here has an anti-gelling additive added during the winter.

Diesel sold in the colder U.S. states also has that additive during the colder months.   I once spoke with a guy who had purchased fuel far enough south that there was no anti-gelling additive (perhaps South Carolina), and he ran into problems when he drove almost straight north on  I-95 on a cold winter day. But bottles of anti-gel additive can usually be purchased at service stations that sell Diesel fuel, and I have added one when very cold weather is forecast.

During the last few winters temperatures have got down to well below -10c (14F) and the only difference when starting the engine is waiting a few seconds for the glow plug light to go out.

It's no fun starting my 7.3L engine when the ambient temperature is below about 20F or -7C.  It will start, but it takes several cycles with the glow plugs (Ford has a "Wait to Start" light that goes out when the plugs are finished).  So I nearly always use the engine block warmer if the overnight temperature is forecast to be less than about 32F or 0C, which also eliminates that nasty cloud of smoke that comes from the tailpipe of a vehicle with a cold Diesel engine.
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cpzilliacus

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #61 on: February 22, 2013, 07:25:37 PM »

Diesel gelling is a bit of a misnomer. Fuel here has an anti-gelling additive added during the winter. During the last few winters temperatures have got down to well below -10c (14F) and the only difference when starting the engine is waiting a few seconds for the glow plug light to go out.

Perhaps in the UK it is a misnomer, but you almost never experience the winter temperatures like we do here in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, etc. The fact is, that in temperatures under about 10 degrees, any contaminants (water, condensation, residue in the fuel tank, filter, or any other part of the fuel system will occlude. This causes return fuel pressure to drop, which in turn causes fuel in the tank to become susceptible to "gelling." Obviously, not everyone who tries to drive in such temperatures will experience such an issue. Combine sub-zero (Fahrenheit) temperatures with any of the above, become stranded 50 miles from the nearest town in a blizzard, and then tell me it is a "misnomer." There are lots of preventative steps which one can take, but in the end buying bad fuel can trump all the preventative measures available.

I am pretty careful when it comes to making fuel purchases. 

Close to home, I usually only buy from a select few stations that I know don't dispense water or algae with their Diesel fuel.

If I am on the road, I try to make Diesel fuel purchases from truck stop chains, or, if I am driving on toll roads, from turnpike service plazas, since selling tainted fuel would presumably tend to put them out of business pretty rapidly.
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #62 on: February 22, 2013, 08:16:39 PM »

As a former truck driver, there is still an element of faith involved, no matter where you buy it.
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #63 on: March 11, 2013, 05:46:30 PM »

The longest I've gone without stopping for gas was in 2005, when I was travelling from seeing my best friend in Minneapolis to my brother's house in North Carolina.  On one segment, I traveled from my sister's house in Savoy, Illinois to just west of Wheeling, West Virginia (I-70/I-77 junction) before re-fueling.

As I recall now, I traveled 422 miles on 13.5 gallons (just over 31 mpg).  Car was my 1999 Ford Contour, which I'm still driving today.  Once the needle dropped below the 1/4 full mark, I decided I should gas up before getting on I-77, and started to look for stations.  I do recall getting a bit worried when I wasn't seeing any "GAS" BBSes approaching exits on I-70.

About the time the fuel light came on (2 gallons left), I found an exit with a Marathon station that took at least four turns to get to and was almost exactly at the MUTCD three mile limit for services.

It was a fun exercise with a good outcome, but at the time, I swore I'd never push the envelope that close again when driving.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2013, 05:51:53 PM by roadman »
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #64 on: March 18, 2013, 07:43:57 PM »

I set my trip for each time I get gas in my 1996 Buick Park Avenue (16 gallon tank) and the farthest I got was 421 miles, over multiple trips. The farthest I remember on one trip was South Haven, MI to Indianapolis, IN and back to Rochester, IN on one tank of gas (and I did some driving around Indianapolis and Rochester had the cheapest gas in a 60 mile radius, so I could have made it close to South Bend otherwise)
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #65 on: March 18, 2013, 08:09:52 PM »

In my 2006 focus, 350 mi was the farthest i ever did on my trips to NJ from ND, i never let it get much below 1/4 a tank (did not want gunk to get sucked into the filter) I could have gone nearly 400 mi, but i did not want to chance having an empty 14 gal tank
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #66 on: March 19, 2013, 10:53:50 PM »

My best so far is 551.4 miles on one tank. That was from Winter Garden, FL to Ocean Springs, MS driving nonstop from mid-morning to mid-afternoon in September last year. My tank is around 19 gallons but that was on 16.6 gallons. That was also my best recorded MPG: 33.215 miles/gallon. I've continually gotten 29+ MPG on the freeway, but that was the only time I've bested 33.

All this is on an automatic transmission 2011 Mazda 6.
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #67 on: March 20, 2013, 02:57:17 AM »

When doing only freeway driving, I average between 31-33 mpg in my Lexus ES350.

All the comfort anyone could want, and up to 3 more mpg than my old (not so faithful) '66 VW bug... However, gas was only 60 cents per gallon back in the day  :-(
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #68 on: March 20, 2013, 11:37:27 AM »

I don't have the exact distance but the furthest I've driven between gas stops was somewhere between 450-500 highway miles on a trip in my '89 Caprice (circa 1993), which has a 25 gallon tank and I refilled it when the needle approached the 1/4 mark; after being stranded on empty 3 times over the years, I didn't want to take any chances.

On the subject of diesels: one reason why diesel-powered cars haven't really re-entered the U.S. market until recently that every poster overlooked thus far is due to more states (IIRC, 25 or 26 of them) adopting the more stringent California emission statutes (aka CARB) over the course of the last 3 decades.  Such statutes effectively banned the sale of new but traditional diesel-powered cars in those states compared to the late 70s/early 80s when only one state (CA) prohibited the sale of new diesel-powered cars.

The reason the statute banned diesel-powered vehicles under a certain gross vehicle weight was emission/smog related.  The diesel-powered cars got exceptional mileage for their sizes but were more polluting.

It is my understanding that the diesel-powered VWs offered in the U.S. over the last few years are of a clean-diesel type that indeed meets the more stringent CARB emission standards that many states have since adopted.

BTW, during the mid-80s Ford also offered a diesel engine options for its Escort and E-series vans and Lincoln offered a BMW-diesel-powered 6-banger as an option during the first few years of its Mark VII coupe.  While those models did not encounter the same issues as GM's diesels did; the fallout from those GM models accompanied w/falling gas prices and the fact that most if not all diesels back then were dirty and slow (0 to 60 in 20 seconds), essentially dried up the demand for diesel-powered cars in the U.S.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2015, 04:00:19 PM by PHLBOS »
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #69 on: March 20, 2013, 11:35:55 PM »

How about time? I've gone an entire 13 hour day of solid roadgeeking without stopping for gas. I was on local streets, so only averaging 25-30 mph, and at 22-24 mpg that's doable with a large tank.

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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #70 on: June 19, 2013, 09:26:42 PM »

I have driven from Newport News to Atlanta (~600 mi) on one tank.
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #71 on: July 05, 2013, 04:55:39 PM »

As I think I mentioned upthread, my truck has about 296,000 miles on the meter.  Aside from changing the oil and filters, I have never done anything to the engine.

 :wow:

I'm used to my gasoline engines having all kinds of small things needing maintenance, like spark plugs, and various gaskets which leak oil.

the spark plugs are not something found on diesel engines - but don't you have gasket breakdowns over the years?  also, stuff like timing belt/water pump?  (okay, maybe not timing belt, but doesn't a diesel engine have a cooling system similar to that of a gasoline engine?)

Timing chain is untouched.  Water pump was leaking a little at 250,000 miles and I replaced it.  Alternators wore out at around 200,000 and they were replaced.  The last such item to wear out was the AC compressor, which I replaced just recently at 300,000 miles. 

Gaskets have never been touched.
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sdmichael

Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #72 on: July 05, 2013, 05:49:51 PM »

I've gone 505 miles on a tank once... it was in my old 1994 Toyota Camry Wagon and that tank even had some dirt miles thrown in there. Filled up in Lancaster, CA and filled up again in Carlsbad, CA. It was a long trip.
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #73 on: July 06, 2013, 04:55:44 PM »

369 miles from Dikinson, ND to Alexandria, MN in my '91 Taurus. 
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Re: Longest you've gone without stopping for gas
« Reply #74 on: July 21, 2013, 06:26:20 PM »

In my own vehicle:  Over 400 miles from San Antonio to New Boston, TX in a 1993 Grand Am.
In a rented vehicle:  Approx 500 miles from Greensboro, NC to just west of Bessemer, AL in a late 90s-early 2000s F150.
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