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New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

 1 
 on: Today at 01:55:52 AM 
Started by J Route Z - Last post by mapman
No Name Road, Guemes Island, Washington.

There's a "No Name Uno" in Gilroy, CA (also signed as "Noname Uno", no suffix), a frontage road to US 101.  As I understand it, "No Name 1" (and a nearby "No Name 2") were intended to be temporary names, but someone decided to roll with it.  I'm also told it's pronounced "no-nahm-ee".
Ironically, our community hospital (Saint Louise Regional Hospital) is located on No Name Uno.

 2 
 on: Today at 01:50:01 AM 
Started by cabiness42 - Last post by US 89
Of the 35+DC states I’ve been to:

DC - haven’t been on DC 295
Indiana - quick loop from Louisville, up 65 and back down 31
Iowa - briefly dropped into the state on US 18
Michigan - airport layover
Minnesota - airport layover
New Hampshire - went through on I-95 and I don’t think we exited anywhere
New Jersey - boat only
New York - no road mileage, though I’ve crossed 9W on foot

It’s worth noting that this is impossible in a state like Georgia, where every interstate or US route also has an underlying state route designation. Interstates have unsigned SR 4xx numbers, but the state routes concurrent with US Highways are almost always signed, and in many cases are actually the better-known name for the roadway - for example, US 23 north of Gainesville is primarily signed as SR 365, and US 19 north of Atlanta is always referred to as 400.

 3 
 on: Today at 01:35:01 AM 
Started by US71 - Last post by Scott5114
But the issues with Oklahoma's roads and Oklahoma's state government are rooted in other problems besides lack of money. A bunch of it just comes down to poor management and very little in the way of long term vision.

As I've mentioned both here and on OKCTalk, stuff like the Craig County sign isn't due to a lack of money. Making a well-laid-out sign usually costs the same as a shitty one. Which means that just throwing money at ODOT probably won't fix its problems.

Quote
ODOT has an enormous burden of roads and bridges to maintain in rural areas that are aging, dying out and depopulating. They need to start doing some serious consolidation.

Not really. Compared to states like AR, KY, MO, or NC that have gobs and gobs of secondaries, the Oklahoma highway system looks comparatively rational and streamlined. You can quibble around with some spurs here and there that could be dropped, but there's not much fat to cut.

Most of the unmet maintenance burden in rural areas is the responsibility of the counties.

 4 
 on: Today at 01:30:11 AM 
Started by 1 - Last post by US 89
Okay, I’ll do Utah. Leaving out duplicates:

I-70 and US 50: Millard, Sevier, Emery, Grand
I-80: Tooele, Salt Lake, Summit
US 6: Juab, Utah, Wasatch, Carbon
US 40: Duchesne, Uintah
Historic US 30S: Box Elder, Weber, Davis, Morgan, Summit

So that’s 13 of Utah’s 29 counties covered by extant routes. But US 30 was split into a 30N and 30S before I-84 became a thing, so if you add in the additional counties on old 30S you’re up to 17/29.

 5 
 on: Today at 01:26:52 AM 
Started by 1 - Last post by Scott5114
Pro tip for those who use mob-rule.com: Overlay your travels on Google Maps for this exercise. You can see routes, county lines, and county names, so no need to juggle multiple tabs!  :D

In many cases, you can also just go to "U.S. Route xx in yy" (like "U.S. Route 60 in Oklahoma") on Wikipedia, and there will be a list of counties there on the junction list. If a route passes through a county but doesn't have any junctions there, it will still be listed, with "No junctions".

Quote
Another question that came to mind: Is it worth doing this exercise for other central states, or is it guaranteed out of the gate that Illinois has the most county connections of any state?

Stretching the definition of "central state", but Texas has such a disgusting number of routes passing through it that it would probably give Illinois a run for its money, especially since US-62 and US-67 are among them.

 6 
 on: Today at 01:11:22 AM 
Started by Roadgeekteen - Last post by Hwy 61 Revisited
Washington-Baltimore has 18:
95, 495, 395 (VA, DC), 295, 695 (DC), 695 (MD), 895, 195, 795, 83, 97, 270, 370, 70, 66, and 595.

DC proper has 95/495, 395, 695, 295, and 66; Baltimore proper has 95, 895, 395, 70, 695, and 83. The metro area often encapsulates both cities.

--

The Delaware Valley has 9:
76, 95, 295, 276, 176, 476, 676, 495, 195.

Philadelphia proper has 76, 95, and 676.

--

Metro New York has 16:
95, 78, 495, 278, 678, 478, 295, 695, 87, 287, 80, 280, 476, 684, 91, 84.

New York proper has 95, 78, 495, 278, 678, 478, 295, 695 and 87.

 7 
 on: Today at 12:52:44 AM 
Started by Roadgeekteen - Last post by DTComposer
For metros, the Bay Area has 10:
80, 280, 380, 580, 680, 780, 880, 980, 238, 205

...but San Francisco itself only has two (80 and 280). I wonder if thatís the greatest disparity in number between city proper and metro? (If you include Oakland and San Jose as cities proper then the two goes up to six (580, 680, 880, 980))

 8 
 on: Today at 12:44:36 AM 
Started by Hwy 61 Revisited - Last post by Hwy 61 Revisited
I've noticed something in the Interstate grid. It looks like some routes ending with 4 (94, 64, 84 east) essentially act as X0 routes, serving major corridors missed by the actual X0s, often more importantthan the cities hit by the actual X0s.

You're going to leave western I-84 off that list? It serves Portland, Boise, and the greater Salt Lake City area, and it's pretty much the route from the Pacific Northwest to anywhere south of I-90.

Sorry, brain-fart.

 9 
 on: Today at 12:29:39 AM 
Started by cabiness42 - Last post by Roadsguy
None for me. For all the states I've been to, I've been on at least one state route, even counting DC with 295.

I've been very close to not having been on a state route in some states, though. In Ohio and West Virginia, I've only been on brief sections of SR 236 and WV 10, respectively, adjacent to Interstates. I thought at first that Indiana would qualify with I-265 having replaced IN 265 at the time that I drove it (albeit not yet on signage), but then I remembered the brief concurrency with IN 62.

 10 
 on: Today at 12:28:48 AM 
Started by Hwy 61 Revisited - Last post by US 89
I've noticed something in the Interstate grid. It looks like some routes ending with 4 (94, 64, 84 east) essentially act as X0 routes, serving major corridors missed by the actual X0s, often more importantthan the cities hit by the actual X0s.

You're going to leave western I-84 off that list? It serves Portland, Boise, and the greater Salt Lake City area, and it's pretty much the route from the Pacific Northwest to anywhere south of I-90.


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