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 1 
 on: Today at 12:12:54 PM 
Started by Roadgeekteen - Last post by mrpablue

 2 
 on: Today at 12:12:35 PM 
Started by TheArkansasRoadgeek - Last post by doorknob60
Mast arms can also handle signage and video detection systems with greater ease.

Assuming both lines are in place, as is standard, that's debatable.  But in either case, ground detection loops are preferable and just as capable of picking up bikes.  I'm less concerned about luxury and commercial modes, in general.  My precedence for who gets a signal (or really, any other planning considerations at all) should be pedestrians first, bicycles second, trucks third, literally all others (if any at all) after that.

Then how come the entire road system in Ada County transitioned from ground detection loops to camera detection over the past decade? (although now they're supposedly moving some signal to radar detection, which I'm not too familiar with, but it sounds promising).

 3 
 on: Today at 12:09:55 PM 
Started by TheArkansasRoadgeek - Last post by Baloo Uriza
^^^
Watched a few videos online. I've never noticed the "MINI" signs before, but sure enough, they're there.

Still, though, most people from most states only recognise two types of fuelling services: full, and self. I can say for sure that I've never seen a "MINI" sign here in Washington before (although I've never noticed them in Oregon, so I guess that's not saying much). In fact, most stations have signs that tell you to tap your horn if you need assistance (typically for those who are disabled). I hardly ever see stations with pumps labelled "FULL".

I'm used to looking for them so I don't accidentally take a ~20Ę/gal burn when I wasn't expecting it.  Same reason why now that minimum service isn't the norm where I drive, I still keep my eyes peeled, since if it's not a QuikTrip, the place with mini islands is going to be a dime cheaper than self, pretty consistently.  Pumping gas isn't that hard, but actuaries seem to be of the opinion that the general public can't be trusted to do this correctly on a consistent basis.

 4 
 on: Today at 12:05:20 PM 
Started by LM117 - Last post by renegade
The Kmart in Monroe, Michigan is closing.  In the mid-1970's, there was talk of a second Kmart for the south side of Monroe.

They built that one on W. Alexis Rd in Toledo.  The Kmart on W. Alexis Rd in Toledo is closing.

The last Sears in Toledo is closing.  The Sears in Monroe Mall closed several years ago.

There's still a Kmart in Ypsilanti/Belleville, Michigan, and a Sears at Briarwood Mall in Ann Arbor.  Come and get them.

Belleville Kmart is still open. Went there last night to look and see how it was doing and there had to be 30-40 cars in the parking lot. It definitely helps that Walmart and Meijer are not right next door. Also, the last Kmart in the Toledo area (OH 2 in Oregon) is closing.

In northern Michigan, the only Kmarts left are Charlevoix, Grayling, and Oscoda (none of whom have Walmart or Meijer). Just in the last two years, Kmart has closed in Acme, Cheboygan, Houghton Lake, Manistee, Traverse City, and West Branch. That doesn't even include the communities that lost theirs farther back, such as Alpena, Big Rapids, Cadillac, Gaylord, Ludington, and Petoskey (Cadillac and Ludington closed during the 2002 bankruptcy, while Alpena, BR, Gaylord, and Petoskey lasted a little longer)
Saginaw no longer has any Kmart's, Bay City's is closing, Midland has one, Clio has one, Flint has none. That's pretty much my part of Michigan.

Don't forget the one in Sault Ste Marie, Michigan has closed.  Come to think of it, the one in Soo, Ontario is long gone as well, although Kmart in Canada had little to do with its U.S. counterpart.

 5 
 on: Today at 11:58:48 AM 
Started by Plutonic Panda - Last post by Baloo Uriza
I'll be the first to agree that housing costs in urban areas is a problem...though that's partially a demand problem and partially a NIMBY problem (the latter for not wanting more dense development to be built in their "neighborhood").

I would also disagree with Bobby regarding blaming this on "New Urbanism".  One of the precepts of that is adequate and affordable housing...which in urban areas usually comes about from having more apartments.  But as I noted above, such developments are often opposed by neighborhoods.

Lastly, is it really that much cheaper to live in the suburbs when whatever housing cost savings you may get is eaten up by higher (sometimes MUCH higher) transportation costs?  Nevermind longer commute times which are not always easy to quantify in a monetary standard.

At least in the Portland area, where job security just isn't a thing if you're not all-white or not straight, it makes it way more survivable during the long stretches in which you will be out of work.  But it does mean it takes 45 minutes each way to do anything more than, say, run to Plaid Pantry, no matter how you're getting there.  Since you're either then riding everywhere, and getting stuck in traffic that doesn't quite understand that the bicycle lane is not a turn lane if you're not on a bicycle, or you're waiting for bus service so bad as to makes EMBARK start looking competitive while you're saving the car for job interviews and emergencies.  Or you're sitting in traffic that would be losing ground to the bike lane if the bike lane weren't blocked.  Granted, since I'm no longer dealing with that shit sandwich anymore, and just not growing up with driving as a core part of the living experience, I don't like spending that much more money when it's not being employer reimbursed on driving places that should be easily handled by bike or transit when I could be spending that money on more fun things, like better surveying gear, or a new fursuit, a camper for my truck, or my IRA...

 6 
 on: Today at 11:56:09 AM 
Started by agentsteel53 - Last post by Brandon
it looks terrible, they just cant stop fucking with it.

That's the problem with programmers.  It's perfect, so let's make it "better"!  More like, better, my ass.

 7 
 on: Today at 11:49:18 AM 
Started by Brandon - Last post by oscar
In fact, we need a 1000-person meetup in the middle of the USA or North America, so we all can meet up from east, west, north and south regions.

We have had "national meets", drawing people from at least three time zones. None of the ones I attended had more than a few dozen participants.

This forum doesn't have 1000 people who do road meets. And for the ones who do, it's hard to round them all up on any specific date and place, considering work and family obligations, financial situations, etc.

 8 
 on: Today at 11:44:48 AM 
Started by jemacedo9 - Last post by doorknob60
Drivers Ed took me on US 74, I-85, and I-277, as well as many surface roads in between

Your driver's ed went on the freeway? Mine only covered local roads, none of which were more than five lanes. I never drove on a road with a speed limit greater than 40 in driver's ed (and that was only one road).

Driver's ed in Bend took us on the Bend Parkway (US-97). 45 MPH speed limit (they actually instructed us to go closer to 50 IIRC, to not be too out of place with traffic speeds) but it's mostly a freeway. Also rural 2 lane roads out to Alfalfa (unsigned 55 MPH, though they told us to try to go 50).

 9 
 on: Today at 11:27:11 AM 
Started by Brandon - Last post by Max Rockatansky
Quote from: cl94
And the people out west are pretty spread out.

Not fully.  There are concentrations in both Seattle/Portland and California.  It's just that, for whatever reason, they haven't tried organizing their own meets.

In California the regulars on the board are spread out pretty far.  Iím in Fresno but there are others in the Bay Area, San Diego, Los Angeles, and the Inland Empire from what Iíve observed.  Given Caltrans lack of major projects I think itís hard to draw interest for a get together over such a wide area.  About the only project that really would have garnered that kind of interest would have been the Hinkley Bypass or I-580 being extended in Carson City.  A lot members just went to those projects in their own travels.  Really itís just the Mud Creek Slide and West Side Parkway as the big projects that I can think of in the near future that might worth seeing.   Iím always up for something like a somewhat unique route clinch or really any excuse to get out of the house. 

 10 
 on: Today at 10:57:37 AM 
Started by Plutonic Panda - Last post by froggie
I'll be the first to agree that housing costs in urban areas is a problem...though that's partially a demand problem and partially a NIMBY problem (the latter for not wanting more dense development to be built in their "neighborhood").

I would also disagree with Bobby regarding blaming this on "New Urbanism".  One of the precepts of that is adequate and affordable housing...which in urban areas usually comes about from having more apartments.  But as I noted above, such developments are often opposed by neighborhoods.

Lastly, is it really that much cheaper to live in the suburbs when whatever housing cost savings you may get is eaten up by higher (sometimes MUCH higher) transportation costs?  Nevermind longer commute times which are not always easy to quantify in a monetary standard.

Quote from: TXtoNJ
I don't think being interested in multimodal roads and transportation systems is mutually exclusive with being a roadgeek. In fact, I'd imagine there are a lot of us here who don't simply want more roads or bigger roads, but better ones.

This.  A thousand times this.


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