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Author Topic: North Carolina  (Read 609521 times)

sprjus4

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3700 on: November 26, 2020, 08:06:51 PM »

The Jacksonville Parkway is a separate arterial roadway from the Jacksonville Bypass, which is a freeway loop around the city.

Both routes have importance, particularly US-17 for north-south traffic, and NC-24 for east-west traffic heading beachbound towards Morehead City.

On the freeway loop portion itself, NC-24 and US-17 have independent segments on the west and northern sides, with an overlap between the routes in the middle portion.
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Dirt Roads

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3701 on: November 26, 2020, 11:46:16 PM »

The Jacksonville Parkway is a separate arterial roadway from the Jacksonville Bypass, which is a freeway loop around the city.

Both routes have importance, particularly US-17 for north-south traffic, and NC-24 for east-west traffic heading beachbound towards Morehead City.

On the freeway loop portion itself, NC-24 and US-17 have independent segments on the west and northern sides, with an overlap between the routes in the middle portion.

To clarify, the Jacksonville Parkway is the freeway section of US-17 from NC-24 up to Marine Boulevard (where US-17 exits headed north).  The Parkway continues as a minor four lane road up to Western Boulevard (NC-53), which is the north-south arterial parallel to this section of the Parkway.  Most of the traffic beyond US-17 is headed toward the mall and other shopping centers along Western Boulevard (even traffic on the minor section).  Does the new speed limit on the Parkway apply to the US-17 segment, the minor segment or both?

I didn't know much about this part of Jacksonville.  But about 5 years ago, the GPS started recommending taking Gum Branch Road through Half Moon.  One time, I decided to try and it worked OK, but I still prefer the Jacksonville Bypass.
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architect77

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3702 on: November 27, 2020, 01:47:11 AM »

If you're referring to Exits 1-4, that's an active construction zone, not terribly surprising. It will all be cleaned up once it's complete.

That construction zone looks half abandoned and underfunded. But that one area is no excuse for the entire Beltline to be an overgrown mess, as is the case at all of the I-540 exit ramps too.

Other cities don't have ubiquitous 6 foot tall weeds on every ramp and growing up through the guardrail. Kill the weeds.

Raleigh usually has among the most beautiful freeways (I-40 East from the airport) and at the same time has some of the sloppiest, visually cluttered arterials with sagging traffic signals etc. The dichotomy is unfortunate.

My idea is to let residents and businesses donate money for nearby intersection aesthetic upgrades, since NCDOT places Mast-arm signals at the lowest level of priority.

Every other state and Charlotte are replacing span-wire signals with metal poles at a rapid pace, and I'm scared that Raleigh won't ever tidy-up intersections to look better like Cary has so close by.
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CanesFan27

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3703 on: November 27, 2020, 09:21:35 PM »

After the authorization of a 431-mile extension of Interstate 77 from Canton, Ohio to Charlotte, North Carolina in 1957, Virginia and North Carolina had to decide between different possible routings of the new highway. 

The biggest question was where the Interstate was to cross the Blue Ridge Mountains.  Virginia looked for a western routing over Low Gap in North Carolina; North Carolina wanted an eastern routing over Fancy Gap.  It took five years for both states to agree on where I-77 was to cross the state line.

I've completed a history on the different proposals (including an early proposed routing of I-77 from the WV TPK via US 460 and VA 100 and attempts to move I-77 further east and even to Wilmington by NC boosters) at the blog.

https://www.gribblenation.org/2020/11/closing-gap-how-interstate-77-in-north.html
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VTGoose

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3704 on: December 01, 2020, 09:34:04 AM »

After the authorization of a 431-mile extension of Interstate 77 from Canton, Ohio to Charlotte, North Carolina in 1957, Virginia and North Carolina had to decide between different possible routings of the new highway. 

The biggest question was where the Interstate was to cross the Blue Ridge Mountains.  Virginia looked for a western routing over Low Gap in North Carolina; North Carolina wanted an eastern routing over Fancy Gap.  It took five years for both states to agree on where I-77 was to cross the state line.

I've completed a history on the different proposals (including an early proposed routing of I-77 from the WV TPK via US 460 and VA 100 and attempts to move I-77 further east and even to Wilmington by NC boosters) at the blog.

https://www.gribblenation.org/2020/11/closing-gap-how-interstate-77-in-north.html

And buried somewhere in the NC legislation is a small phrase that says "I-77 must be perpetually under construction at all times someone along its length in the state."

Some old ideas never die -- the eastern route for I-77 from Princeton via U.S. 460 surfaced as a route for I-73 from Princeton to I-81, although it was an all-U.S. 460 routing instead of jogging over to VA 100 (the better to hit closer to Roanoke, then the turn south).

I-77 between Fort Chiswell and Fancy Gap is becoming more like I-81 with the need for a third lane in places. There are several grades where trucks micro-passing each other can block traffic for quite a distance. As we saw on Sunday (always a heavy travel day on I-77 post-Thanksgiving) one minor accident blocking one lane can back up traffic for miles. Going southbound in the morning for a quick errand to Winston-Salem, a wreck on the northbound side had a long backup behind it. Coming back that evening, a wreck on the southbound side just before dropping down to the New River Bridge had traffic backed up to I-81.

Bruce in Blacksburg
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Dirt Roads

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3705 on: December 01, 2020, 11:50:00 AM »

Some old ideas never die -- the eastern route for I-77 from Princeton via U.S. 460 surfaced as a route for I-73 from Princeton to I-81, although it was an all-U.S. 460 routing instead of jogging over to VA 100 (the better to hit closer to Roanoke, then the turn south).

Bruce in Blacksburg

Sending the reply to this over to the I-73 Virginia thread in the Mid-Atlantic forum.  Sorry for me sending us down a rabbit hole.
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cowboy_wilhelm

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3706 on: December 02, 2020, 05:28:23 PM »

The Asheboro Bypass is very close to completion.

The new ramps for the I-85/US 321 interchange were supposed to open by Nov. 16 and Nov. 30, but I haven't seen anything indicating either have opened.

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Dirt Roads

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3707 on: December 02, 2020, 05:52:09 PM »

The Asheboro Bypass is very close to completion.

The bridges over US-220 (still too hard to call it I-73/I-74) were nearing completion when I went to Seagrove back in October.  Whereas many new overpasses in North Carolina are getting dogwood flowers stamped on the outfacing end caps of center piers, the ones for the Asheboro Bypass (future By-Pass US-64) had elephants.  For those who have never been, the North Carolina Zoo is well worth the trip (and not far from Seagrove, if you like old-timey pottery and face-jugs).
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tjcreasy

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3708 on: December 02, 2020, 10:59:13 PM »

NCDOT got the NC 49 SB control city right. I was surprised to see Charlotte shown as the control city there. It would have been nice to see Raleigh as the control city for US 64 EB, but the US 421 junction in Siler City holds more weight I suppose with NCDOT. This may change as they State continues to solidly US-64/NC49 as a viable alternate route between Raleigh and Charlotte.
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cowboy_wilhelm

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3709 on: December 03, 2020, 08:06:01 AM »

Whereas many new overpasses in North Carolina are getting dogwood flowers stamped on the outfacing end caps of center piers, the ones for the Asheboro Bypass (future By-Pass US-64) had elephants.

Said elephants:

NCDOT got the NC 49 SB control city right. I was surprised to see Charlotte shown as the control city there. It would have been nice to see Raleigh as the control city for US 64 EB, but the US 421 junction in Siler City holds more weight I suppose with NCDOT. This may change as they State continues to solidly US-64/NC49 as a viable alternate route between Raleigh and Charlotte.

With these gigantic overhead signs, you wonder why they can't put two cities on there. Is that a newer thing? There are plenty of signs across the state with two cities listed.
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tjcreasy

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3710 on: December 03, 2020, 10:54:50 AM »

Those end cap stamps look great!
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sprjus4

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3711 on: December 03, 2020, 04:09:19 PM »

The Asheboro Bypass is very close to completion.
Per NCDOT, as of today, opening is currently slated for mid-December.
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RoadPelican

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3712 on: December 04, 2020, 04:11:39 PM »

The Asheboro Bypass should be open by NOW.  I do not understand what the hold up is, maybe NCDOT is waiting for Governor Cooper to clear his calendar so they can have a ribbon cutting ceremony.  Tom Allen on Youtube has posted videos of NCDOT posting signs along the route and this was BEFORE Thanksgiving!!!!  The road has been paved and ready to go for about a month now!!!!

It's very odd that the opening date for the next leg of the Greensboro loop was announced before the Asheboro bypass!!!!
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cowboy_wilhelm

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3713 on: December 04, 2020, 05:33:49 PM »

It will be interesting to see what traffic volumes look like on the Asheboro Bypass. Traffic volumes are pretty low on 49 and 64 west of Asheboro. I never got the impression that much of the traffic in Asheboro was through-traffic and was more local traffic. Iím guessing maybe 10K AADT in the beginning (ignoring COVID). Maybe this is a case of build it and they will come. Then the westbound through-traffic will be dumping onto two lane highways that arenít being widened any time soon. Only two short projects are in the STIP for widening 49 and 64, and theyíre not funded before 2028, if then. The widening projects for these two sections have not fared well in the prioritization process over the past few years, and any future projects are unlikely given the current financial picture for NCDOT.

It will be convenient to not have the traffic lights and congestion, but it will unfortunately not offer much in time savings due to its circuitous routing. Using Google traffic estimates, the trip time westbound to 49 will be about the same as driving straight through during non-peak hours (roughly 9.5-10 minutes).

It will be nice when itís open. Iím sure the people there will appreciate it. I will be glad to use it as an alternative to the 40/85 grind. It's just amazing how many hundreds of millions of dollars it costs to build a project of this scale, and it doesn't even save you any time and benefits relatively few.
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The Ghostbuster

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3714 on: December 04, 2020, 09:30:47 PM »

As you all know, the US 64 Asheboro Bypass includes an extension of the Zoo Parkway that presently connects NC 159 with the North Carolina Zoo. That should make accessing the zoo much easier.
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Dirt Roads

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3715 on: December 04, 2020, 10:07:58 PM »

As you all know, the US 64 Asheboro Bypass includes an extension of the Zoo Parkway that presently connects NC 159 with the North Carolina Zoo. That should make accessing the zoo much easier.

And that should clean things up on Dixie Drive (current US-64/NC-49) through the main drag of Asheboro.  Traffic using US-64 and NC-49 should benefit by using the new bypass, but I wonder if US-64 traffic should just stay on the current route through town.  This has always been a zig-zag town.  Folks in West Virginia have long known that US-52 to US-64 to US-220 to US-74 was the best route to Myrtle Beach (so the new I-74 is a natural course).  After I-74 opened from Winston, I suspect that much of the Asheboro traffic is some form of Raleigh-to-Charlotte or Zoo traffic proper.
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CanesFan27

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3716 on: December 05, 2020, 04:44:02 PM »

As you all know, the US 64 Asheboro Bypass includes an extension of the Zoo Parkway that presently connects NC 159 with the North Carolina Zoo. That should make accessing the zoo much easier.

Yes, as a family that would visit the zoo nearly every month prior to COVID, this will be very helpful.
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LM117

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3717 on: December 09, 2020, 04:11:33 PM »

As part of the I-40 widening project between southeast Raleigh and Clayton, the flyover bridge from I-440 East to I-40 East (Exit 16) will be closed this weekend.

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/2020/2020-12-09-shift-new-flyover-i-440-east-i-40-east.aspx
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ďI donít know whether to wind my ass or scratch my watch!Ē - Jim Cornette

architect77

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3718 on: December 12, 2020, 05:21:34 PM »

It will be interesting to see what traffic volumes look like on the Asheboro Bypass. Traffic volumes are pretty low on 49 and 64 west of Asheboro. I never got the impression that much of the traffic in Asheboro was through-traffic and was more local traffic. Iím guessing maybe 10K AADT in the beginning (ignoring COVID). Maybe this is a case of build it and they will come. Then the westbound through-traffic will be dumping onto two lane highways that arenít being widened any time soon. Only two short projects are in the STIP for widening 49 and 64, and theyíre not funded before 2028, if then. The widening projects for these two sections have not fared well in the prioritization process over the past few years, and any future projects are unlikely given the current financial picture for NCDOT.

It will be convenient to not have the traffic lights and congestion, but it will unfortunately not offer much in time savings due to its circuitous routing. Using Google traffic estimates, the trip time westbound to 49 will be about the same as driving straight through during non-peak hours (roughly 9.5-10 minutes).

It will be nice when itís open. Iím sure the people there will appreciate it. I will be glad to use it as an alternative to the 40/85 grind. It's just amazing how many hundreds of millions of dollars it costs to build a project of this scale, and it doesn't even save you any time and benefits relatively few.

I think that the 49/64 corridor is considered to be a crucial alternative route for East-West intrastate movement of freight and people. Before the Great Recession they were talking about upgrading to interstate standards as an official freight corridor between Charlotte and Raleigh and an important link in the overall building for the next 50 years effortt.

So it's not overbuild for low traffic voulmes. It's i-85's parallel alternate, a future super valuable piece of infrastructure.
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RoadPelican

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3719 on: December 13, 2020, 12:12:27 PM »

In terms of alternate ways from Charlotte to Raleigh, NC 24/27 to I-73/74 to US 64 is going to be the best alternate in a few years.  There is a project fully funded by Connect NC Bonds that will widen NC 24/27 from west of the Troy bypass to the Pee Dee River.  This project is slated to begin construction in 2023.  Another project to widen NC 24/27 from Albemarle to the Pee Dee River is expected to be completed sometime in 2021.

For the NC 49 corridor from Charlotte to Asheboro, there is only one widening project that is dated post-2029 for construction to begin, this project only goes for a few miles west of the Asheboro bypass.  There are no other projects in the current NC STIP to widen any more of NC 49.  There is a 2 lane portion from Mt. Pleasant to Complex that is 25 miles long, although there is a short 4 lane section and bridge over the Tuckertown Reservoir.
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Revive 755

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3720 on: December 13, 2020, 12:44:19 PM »

It will be interesting to see what traffic volumes look like on the Asheboro Bypass. Traffic volumes are pretty low on 49 and 64 west of Asheboro. I never got the impression that much of the traffic in Asheboro was through-traffic and was more local traffic. Iím guessing maybe 10K AADT in the beginning (ignoring COVID). Maybe this is a case of build it and they will come. Then the westbound through-traffic will be dumping onto two lane highways that arenít being widened any time soon. Only two short projects are in the STIP for widening 49 and 64, and theyíre not funded before 2028, if then. The widening projects for these two sections have not fared well in the prioritization process over the past few years, and any future projects are unlikely given the current financial picture for NCDOT.

It will be convenient to not have the traffic lights and congestion, but it will unfortunately not offer much in time savings due to its circuitous routing. Using Google traffic estimates, the trip time westbound to 49 will be about the same as driving straight through during non-peak hours (roughly 9.5-10 minutes).

It will be nice when itís open. Iím sure the people there will appreciate it. I will be glad to use it as an alternative to the 40/85 grind. It's just amazing how many hundreds of millions of dollars it costs to build a project of this scale, and it doesn't even save you any time and benefits relatively few.

I think that the 49/64 corridor is considered to be a crucial alternative route for East-West intrastate movement of freight and people. Before the Great Recession they were talking about upgrading to interstate standards as an official freight corridor between Charlotte and Raleigh and an important link in the overall building for the next 50 years effortt.

A planned extension of the I-36 designation proposed for what is now I-42?
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wdcrft63

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3721 on: December 13, 2020, 06:31:58 PM »

It will be interesting to see what traffic volumes look like on the Asheboro Bypass. Traffic volumes are pretty low on 49 and 64 west of Asheboro. I never got the impression that much of the traffic in Asheboro was through-traffic and was more local traffic. Iím guessing maybe 10K AADT in the beginning (ignoring COVID). Maybe this is a case of build it and they will come. Then the westbound through-traffic will be dumping onto two lane highways that arenít being widened any time soon. Only two short projects are in the STIP for widening 49 and 64, and theyíre not funded before 2028, if then. The widening projects for these two sections have not fared well in the prioritization process over the past few years, and any future projects are unlikely given the current financial picture for NCDOT.

It will be convenient to not have the traffic lights and congestion, but it will unfortunately not offer much in time savings due to its circuitous routing. Using Google traffic estimates, the trip time westbound to 49 will be about the same as driving straight through during non-peak hours (roughly 9.5-10 minutes).

It will be nice when itís open. Iím sure the people there will appreciate it. I will be glad to use it as an alternative to the 40/85 grind. It's just amazing how many hundreds of millions of dollars it costs to build a project of this scale, and it doesn't even save you any time and benefits relatively few.

I think that the 49/64 corridor is considered to be a crucial alternative route for East-West intrastate movement of freight and people. Before the Great Recession they were talking about upgrading to interstate standards as an official freight corridor between Charlotte and Raleigh and an important link in the overall building for the next 50 years effortt.

A planned extension of the I-36 designation proposed for what is now I-42?
Not likely. NCDOT's plan for US 64 between NC 540 and US 1 in Cary calls for some substantial upgrades, but not to interstate standards.
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cowboy_wilhelm

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3722 on: December 14, 2020, 04:18:11 PM »

The Asheboro Bypass is opening Friday, 12/18/2020.

US 64 Bypass expected to ease Dixie Drive traffic starting Friday
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The Ghostbuster

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3723 on: December 14, 2020, 06:30:45 PM »

When the US 64 Asheboro Bypass opens, can someone drive along it and get pictures of the new bypass? I don't want to have to wait for Google Maps and its Street View to be updated to see what this new roadway looks like.
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sprjus4

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3724 on: December 14, 2020, 06:41:55 PM »

The speed limit will be increased from 45 mph to 55 mph along the US-421 Salem Pkwy through Downtown Winston-Salem.

55 mph speed limit to take effect on Salem Parkway in downtown Winston-Salem
Quote
Workers will start putting up signs on Tuesday to give Salem Parkway in downtown Winston-Salem a new 55 mph speed limit.

State highway officials said the work will likely start about 9 a.m. Tuesday, or even a little earlier, depending on how the Tuesday morning rush hour develops.

Larry Shaver, a resident engineer for the N.C. Department of Transportation, said some folks won't notice the change because they're already driving faster.

"I think they're already there. We are just going to make it official," Shaver said.

A higher speed limit on the currently 45-mph stretch was one of the pluses that highway officials dangled as a possibility when the massive downtown freeway do-over was underway.

Business 40 shut down on Nov. 17, 2018 and underwent months of demolition and reconstruction before emerging as Salem Parkway on Feb. 2.

The new road has longer lanes for getting on and off the highway, higher bridge clearances and other enhancements, including two pedestrian crossings.

Highway workers have to replace nine traffic signs to put the new speed limit into effect.

The $100-million renovation was a joint project of Flatiron Constructors Inc., Blythe Development Co. and HDR Engineering.

Shaver said that while the project is largely finished, additional work awarded to the contractors will extend the final completion date of the Salem Parkway project through January.

The extra work includes upgrading traffic cameras along the whole route between the connecting points to Interstate 40 on both the east and the west. Also, Shaver said, the contractors are busy installing directional signs downtown and in other areas in connection with Salem Parkway.

Most of the work on the part of Salem Parkway downtown is complete and many people might not notice the small projects that are taking place as the entire renovation nears its final completion.
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