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Author Topic: North Carolina  (Read 627258 times)

ahj2000

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3750 on: January 24, 2021, 07:08:04 PM »

It's unfortunate that NCDOT didn't expand the project limits of project I-4400 (the I-26 widening) beyond U.S. 25 to include the stretch across Green River. That section desperately needs truck climbing lanes, particularly westbound. While the widened structure could theoretically accommodate three lanes with a design exception, I don't believe the approaches on either side will be able to receive a design exception due to the geometry of the alignment. There is a 50 mph advisory sign on the eastbound approach, and the profile in the roadway plans notes that the design speed is 50 mph for the curves on both sides of the bridge, which does not meet the posted speed limit of 55 mph. This is an $18 million band-aid to keep the existing structures from falling apart since NCDOT can't seem to start planning for anything until it's 30 years overdue.
Oh yeah. That whole section is going to be super well traveled, especially as there are more and more people moving to Asheville, especially those who are from/half in Florida. Traffic doesnít start at US 25/Hendersonville, and NCDOT is ignoring that fact, compounded by the steep grades on a heavily trucked route.
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snowc

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3751 on: January 27, 2021, 09:23:58 AM »

Just completed a nice sized update to how North Carolina eventually built I-40 from the Triangle to Wilmington.  A lot of the information in this update deals with how the extension of I-40 to I-95 gradually moved south from Smithfield to Four Oaks and ultimately near Benson.

A few things of note:

1. A Benson Lawyer named Joe Levinson was instrumental in moving 40 from Smithfield to Benson and eventually Wilmington.
2. NCDOT had a number of different corridors in the early 70s and attempted a number of compromises by attempting to split 40 into two spurs (the split pretty much would occur near Clayton)
3. It really wasn't until 1977 that the Benson route was decided upon - the decision to extend to Wilmington would happen one year later.
4. Finally, part of NC's current interstate blitz can be traced to 1) the 1968 request for various extensions but also to the final decision to route 40 to Wilmington.  If routed to Morehead City - we would still have had a strong push to built an Interstate to Wilmington and it may have come earlier than the relatively recent designation of I-42 to Morehead City.

The updated information begins in the Saga of the last 120 Miles section.

https://www.gribblenation.org/2016/08/to-shore-north-carolinas-struggle-to.html
Good to know!
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architect77

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3752 on: January 27, 2021, 12:52:08 PM »

It's unfortunate that NCDOT didn't expand the project limits of project I-4400 (the I-26 widening) beyond U.S. 25 to include the stretch across Green River. That section desperately needs truck climbing lanes, particularly westbound. While the widened structure could theoretically accommodate three lanes with a design exception, I don't believe the approaches on either side will be able to receive a design exception due to the geometry of the alignment. There is a 50 mph advisory sign on the eastbound approach, and the profile in the roadway plans notes that the design speed is 50 mph for the curves on both sides of the bridge, which does not meet the posted speed limit of 55 mph. This is an $18 million band-aid to keep the existing structures from falling apart since NCDOT can't seem to start planning for anything until it's 30 years overdue.

Remember less purchasing power with limited funding that must be spread very thinly over all 100 counties to maintain 80,000 miles of roads. I think they do a great job with just $5-6 billion a year, and that includes running the ferries and other stuff under their responsibility.
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cowboy_wilhelm

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3753 on: January 27, 2021, 09:22:28 PM »

It's unfortunate that NCDOT didn't expand the project limits of project I-4400 (the I-26 widening) beyond U.S. 25 to include the stretch across Green River. That section desperately needs truck climbing lanes, particularly westbound. While the widened structure could theoretically accommodate three lanes with a design exception, I don't believe the approaches on either side will be able to receive a design exception due to the geometry of the alignment. There is a 50 mph advisory sign on the eastbound approach, and the profile in the roadway plans notes that the design speed is 50 mph for the curves on both sides of the bridge, which does not meet the posted speed limit of 55 mph. This is an $18 million band-aid to keep the existing structures from falling apart since NCDOT can't seem to start planning for anything until it's 30 years overdue.

Remember less purchasing power with limited funding that must be spread very thinly over all 100 counties to maintain 80,000 miles of roads. I think they do a great job with just $5-6 billion a year, and that includes running the ferries and other stuff under their responsibility.

Yeah. They're doing a great job. That's why, despite a budget shortfall of hundreds of millions of dollars and strong economic headwinds, they're proceeding with much needed projects like the U.S. 221 Rutherfordton Bypass. They only need an additional $20 million for right-of-way acquisition, on top of the $36 million they've already allocated for ONE section. They've done such a great job with planning and preliminary engineering that the ESTIMATED construction cost has increased by $20 million to more than $110 million. Since the costs have increased so much, they've had to delay construction of the next section until 2028.

So, for a mere $170 million, you get 3.5 miles of an incomplete bypass that - one of these years or decades - will allow a few vehicles to bypass a dying mill town in nowhere North Carolina; once they've shelled out another $110 million (or much more) to complete the next section.

This 90's road building mentality ain't gonna cut it much longer.
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CanesFan27

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3754 on: January 31, 2021, 08:35:52 PM »

Had a chance yesterday to explore Rowan, Davidson, and Stanly Counties.
https://www.gribblenation.org/2021/01/new-camera-lets-roadgeek.html

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LM117

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3755 on: February 03, 2021, 04:51:07 PM »

Upcoming weekend closure at the I-40/I-440 interchange in SE Raleigh.

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/2021/2021-02-03-i-440-east-i-40-east-flyover-demo.aspx
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LM117

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3756 on: February 05, 2021, 12:29:00 PM »

As mentioned in the Charlotte thread, extended vehicles will be allowed to use the I-77 toll lanes, beginning February 8.

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/2021/2021-02-05-extended-vehicles-use-i-77-express-lanes.aspx
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architect77

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3757 on: February 09, 2021, 08:58:49 AM »

It's unfortunate that NCDOT didn't expand the project limits of project I-4400 (the I-26 widening) beyond U.S. 25 to include the stretch across Green River. That section desperately needs truck climbing lanes, particularly westbound. While the widened structure could theoretically accommodate three lanes with a design exception, I don't believe the approaches on either side will be able to receive a design exception due to the geometry of the alignment. There is a 50 mph advisory sign on the eastbound approach, and the profile in the roadway plans notes that the design speed is 50 mph for the curves on both sides of the bridge, which does not meet the posted speed limit of 55 mph. This is an $18 million band-aid to keep the existing structures from falling apart since NCDOT can't seem to start planning for anything until it's 30 years overdue.

Remember less purchasing power with limited funding that must be spread very thinly over all 100 counties to maintain 80,000 miles of roads. I think they do a great job with just $5-6 billion a year, and that includes running the ferries and other stuff under their responsibility.

Yeah. They're doing a great job. That's why, despite a budget shortfall of hundreds of millions of dollars and strong economic headwinds, they're proceeding with much needed projects like the U.S. 221 Rutherfordton Bypass. They only need an additional $20 million for right-of-way acquisition, on top of the $36 million they've already allocated for ONE section. They've done such a great job with planning and preliminary engineering that the ESTIMATED construction cost has increased by $20 million to more than $110 million. Since the costs have increased so much, they've had to delay construction of the next section until 2028.

So, for a mere $170 million, you get 3.5 miles of an incomplete bypass that - one of these years or decades - will allow a few vehicles to bypass a dying mill town in nowhere North Carolina; once they've shelled out another $110 million (or much more) to complete the next section.

This 90's road building mentality ain't gonna cut it much longer.

Apparently US221 is part of a larger effort to bring a  4 lane highway through the area, a decades -old goal is to bring a 4 lane , modern, divided highway to within 10 miles of 96% of the population.

From the bypoass website: "The project is a part of a larger project to create a 4 lane highway from the NC/SC Stateline to I-40 in Marion."

I would say that eventually you have to build something in every area of the state. Some will be more needed than others, but they try to give citizens something for a lifetime of paying gas taxes.
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froggie

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3758 on: February 09, 2021, 09:15:10 AM »

Quote from: architect77
but they try to give citizens something for a lifetime of paying gas taxes.

NC has a very extensive paved secondary road system.  That's what they got.
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plain

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3759 on: February 10, 2021, 03:12:40 AM »

Quote from: architect77
but they try to give citizens something for a lifetime of paying gas taxes.

NC has a very extensive paved secondary road system.  That's what they got.

Very true.

Most of NC's non-primary roads, even in rural areas, are in much better shape than many other states and it's been that way since at least the 1980's. I'll definitely give them that.
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cowboy_wilhelm

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3760 on: February 10, 2021, 09:33:58 AM »

Apparently US221 is part of a larger effort to bring a  4 lane highway through the area, a decades -old goal is to bring a 4 lane , modern, divided highway to within 10 miles of 96% of the population.

Sure, throw another quarter of a billion dollars at it.

This 90's road building mentality ain't gonna cut it much longer.
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architect77

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3761 on: February 11, 2021, 09:47:44 AM »

Apparently US221 is part of a larger effort to bring a  4 lane highway through the area, a decades -old goal is to bring a 4 lane , modern, divided highway to within 10 miles of 96% of the population.

I don't know why that little part is costing so much money. But there is some basis if it's part of a bigger overall corridor. And NCDOT has certainly made plenty of bad decisions over the decades like the new type of pavement or whatever on I-40 near Chapel Hill that had to be replaced, or I-40 through Raleigh with the strange foundation that led to rebuilding the entire freeway from scratch.

Those 65,000 miles of secondary roads are special compared to other states. But they were paid for long, long, ago. When people in all 100 counties are paying up to $8 per tank for NC gas taxes, I think over their lifetimes they should get something improved in their area. Maintenance of the existing network of roads isn't enough.

But I'm not for wasting funding for the purpose of building something in every region for the hell of it. That used to go on when they were dividing 30% of the yearly gas tax revenue evenly among the highwya divisions. McCrory redid the funding entirely and it's all based on needs and benefits to an area.

Thank God early on the state wanted to have the best roads built to the highest standards. That set a precedent and a high bar that's remained ever since albeit somewhat watered down.

Only a very few states spend extra for the best footings for signs attached to the ground or round the corners of the large overhead signs. The I-40/I-85 duplex through Burlington is almost 25 years old and everything still looks perfect. The blue gas/food/lodging signs are all perfectly level after 25 years with severe weather events, etc.


The highway system is aging and that's the biggest issue now. At some point they will need to stop building new and just focus on renewing what's already built.
Sure, throw another quarter of a billion dollars at it.

Georgia cannot erect overhead signs that are visually level. 80% statewide all lean down to one side. Shoulder signs mostly don't have concrete footings at all. They don't remove litter regularly, and there are no overhead guidance signs at all on non-interstate roads even at junctions with interstates. They do the bare minimum possible.
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tolbs17

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3762 on: February 14, 2021, 12:46:57 PM »

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/Pages/U-4738-2019-04-30.aspx

I'm guessing this project has been scrapped because of the great impacts to the wetlands and businesses?
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Mapmikey

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3763 on: February 14, 2021, 02:19:05 PM »

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/Pages/U-4738-2019-04-30.aspx

I'm guessing this project has been scrapped because of the great impacts to the wetlands and businesses?

It is in the STIP dated Feb 2021.  It has been and continues to be shown as unfunded...

https://connect.ncdot.gov/projects/planning/STIPDocuments1/NCDOT%20Current%20STIP.pdf

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tolbs17

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3764 on: February 14, 2021, 04:07:02 PM »

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/Pages/U-5932-2019-05-16.aspx

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/Documents/U-5932-public-meeting-map.pdf

Will this project still happen? Because this is one of the worst proposals I've ever seen in my life. And yes, it's from May 2019. I want to review it again
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ahj2000

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3765 on: February 14, 2021, 06:02:10 PM »

So like kind of purposely through two fast food joints?
...
Okay....
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tolbs17

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3766 on: February 14, 2021, 06:18:04 PM »

So like kind of purposely through two fast food joints?
...
Okay....
Yes.

And it's 3 not 2. Also, it goes through a gas station aswell. How can we fix that?
« Last Edit: February 15, 2021, 06:30:11 AM by tolbs17 »
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Mapmikey

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3767 on: February 14, 2021, 06:33:20 PM »

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/Pages/U-5932-2019-05-16.aspx

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/Documents/U-5932-public-meeting-map.pdf

Will this project still happen? Because this is one of the worst proposals I've ever seen in my life. And yes, it's from May 2019. I want to review it again

The pdf of the STIP I linked to is searchable...this project has $ set aside for right of way and utilities in FY 2025 and 2026; construction ($29M) shows as unfunded
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snowc

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3768 on: February 16, 2021, 11:57:46 AM »

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/Pages/U-5932-2019-05-16.aspx

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/Documents/U-5932-public-meeting-map.pdf

Will this project still happen? Because this is one of the worst proposals I've ever seen in my life. And yes, it's from May 2019. I want to review it again

The pdf of the STIP I linked to is searchable...this project has $ set aside for right of way and utilities in FY 2025 and 2026; construction ($29M) shows as unfunded
This looks VERY similar to NC 55/US 64 interchange. 😳
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LM117

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3769 on: February 18, 2021, 08:29:19 PM »

NCDOT will hold a virtual informational meeting on December 3 to give an update on the ongoing NC-12 "jug handle" bridge project in Rodanthe. Completion is currently expected in late 2021.

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/2020/2020-11-24-december-rodanthe-meeting.aspx

Another virtual meeting will be held on March 4.

https://www.ncdot.gov/news/press-releases/Pages/2021/2021-02-18-march-rodanthe-meeting.aspx
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CanesFan27

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3770 on: February 20, 2021, 12:37:04 PM »

The Wil-Cox Bridge is one of the few remaining open-spandrel concrete arch bridges in North Carolina.  Opened in 1924, it is now the centerpiece of Davidson County's Yadkin River Park.   The bridge was scheduled to be demolished about a decade ago when NCDOT built two new I-85 bridges just downstream.  Fortunately, Davidson County took ownership of the bridge to preserve it and allow future generations to enjoy it along with learning the over 12,000-year history of the area known as The Trading Ford.'

https://www.carolinaxroads.com/2021/02/yadkin-river-park-wil-cox-bridge.html
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tolbs17

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3771 on: February 22, 2021, 09:07:20 PM »

At Waynesville, why can't there be a spur like an I-x40. If anything it will probably be I-740 or I-940. Or even better, going all the way to Bryson City.

I'm not being fictional, btw.
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ahj2000

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3772 on: February 22, 2021, 10:04:59 PM »

At Waynesville, why can't there be a spur like an I-x40. If anything it will probably be I-740 or I-940. Or even better, going all the way to Bryson City.

I'm not being fictional, btw.
Itís not very fast, but the standards arenít bad. I think to Waynesville you might have an Interstate standard highway, although I believe it is 55 and 60 mph. It would need work in a few sections (Whittier-Sylvia, Sylva-Waynesville) to go all the way to Bryson
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tolbs17

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3773 on: February 22, 2021, 11:04:44 PM »

At Waynesville, why can't there be a spur like an I-x40. If anything it will probably be I-740 or I-940. Or even better, going all the way to Bryson City.

I'm not being fictional, btw.
Itís not very fast, but the standards arenít bad. I think to Waynesville you might have an Interstate standard highway, although I believe it is 55 and 60 mph. It would need work in a few sections (Whittier-Sylvia, Sylva-Waynesville) to go all the way to Bryson
There's freeways there but it kinda tells me they are in odd locations
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The Ghostbuster

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #3774 on: February 23, 2021, 02:21:20 PM »

How many more Interstates does North Carolina need? I know the potential numbers aren't maxed out, but I sure am.
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