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Author Topic: I-73 in VA  (Read 118404 times)

LM117

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #325 on: February 26, 2018, 06:42:51 AM »

The Henry County Board of Supervisors will vote tomorrow on whether or not to remain in the I-73 Coalition.

http://www.martinsvillebulletin.com/news/should-henry-county-stay-in-the-i--coalition/article_5b0f7bf8-1a81-11e8-bf4b-7bce5b55ae77.html

Quote
On Tuesday, the Henry County Board of Supervisors will consider whether to remain a part of the “Interstate 73 Coalition.”

The coalition is currently comprised of Martinsville and Roanoke plus Henry, Franklin and Roanoke counties, as the Virginia stretch of the planned highway would run through or near each locality. Each city and county provides money for the coalition, which in turn goes to the lobbying firm of Alcalde and Fay. As per the contract, Martinsville pays $1,000 per month, while Franklin and Henry counties each pay $1,500. Roanoke and Roanoke County both pay $2,000 per month to the firm. In exchange, the lobbyists are asked to go to Richmond and Washington D.C. and convince lawmakers to help fund I-73.

Martinsville voted earlier this month to continue their contract for another 12 months. Roanoke County's supervisors did the same. Henry County's contract expired Dec. 31 and on Tuesday, the supervisors will consider a proposed one-year extension of the contract with the county’s fee of $1,500 per month remaining the same.

Board documents show that the county staff recommends that supervisors approve the extension, which would total $18,000. That money would be taken from the county's contingency fund. In the board packet, the reasoning behind the staff's recommendation is that they feel the relationship with Alcalde and Fay has “produced more awareness on the state and federal levels of the I-73 project and the issues surrounding it.”

As the Bulletin reported earlier this month, there are two problems preventing movement on the overall I-73 project. The first is that the Army Corps of Engineers will not issue a permit for the project as is. They have concerns over the extent of stream impacts and asked for some additional analysis. The second problem is that the Virginia Department of Transportation doesn't have the money needed to do that analysis.

The last Environmental Impact Statement on I-73 was done in November 2006. The Army Corps is asking for that to be updated, which would take an estimated $8 to $10 million and 4 to 5 years to complete, according to VDOT officials. That study would look at both the questions raised by the Corps and present any possible alternative routes, in order to see if a different plan would have less of an impact on the area.

Once the study is submitted, it has to be approved both by the Army Corps and the Federal Highway Administration. That has to be done before a final design can be created. Between the study and approval process, it takes between 5 to 8 years to finish. After that, then officials will need to find money for the project's design and construction.


Part of the funding puzzle will be addressed by the Virginia General Assembly. Earlier this month, the Virginia Senate approved a bill by Sen. Bill Stanley to provide at least $40 million annually for the I-73 corridor development fund. There is a catch, however. That money comes from tax stamps the state derives from the transfer of real property. It is currently allocated to the U.S. Route 58 corridor development fund. The money will not move over to I-73 until all of Route 58 becomes four lanes, which Stanley anticipates should be in about 10 years, in 2028.
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Strider

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #326 on: February 27, 2018, 09:14:31 PM »

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LM117

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #327 on: February 28, 2018, 03:12:05 AM »

« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 03:15:32 AM by LM117 »
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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #328 on: February 28, 2018, 08:46:13 AM »

So with some counties leaving and others staying, does this make I-73 in VA effectively dead until they all come back, or does it mean that when/if it's ever built, it'll be built in bits and pieces in the remaining counties until the ones that left decide to get back on board and finish it?
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Strider

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #329 on: February 28, 2018, 11:20:54 AM »

So with some counties leaving and others staying, does this make I-73 in VA effectively dead until they all come back, or does it mean that when/if it's ever built, it'll be built in bits and pieces in the remaining counties until the ones that left decide to get back on board and finish it?


No, I-73 is not dead. The state has a very, very and very long way to go on building I-73, and the EIS must be conducted first before the Corps can approve the permit. The Corps asked for a updated study since the last one was done back in 2006. (it is not cheap to do a EIS).

However, Martinsville City Council will remain a part of the Interstate 73 Coalition after a 4-1 vote.


« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 11:28:24 AM by Strider »
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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #330 on: February 28, 2018, 11:42:31 AM »

So with some counties leaving and others staying, does this make I-73 in VA effectively dead until they all come back, or does it mean that when/if it's ever built, it'll be built in bits and pieces in the remaining counties until the ones that left decide to get back on board and finish it?


No, I-73 is not dead. The state has a very, very and very long way to go on building I-73, and the EIS must be conducted first before the Corps can approve the permit. The Corps asked for a updated study since the last one was done back in 2006. (it is not cheap to do a EIS).

However, Martinsville City Council will remain a part of the Interstate 73 Coalition after a 4-1 vote.


While they are at it, the FHA announced a study that will focus on US 220 between NC state line and Martinsville bypass. They hope to have the study complete by 2021. The study could include the proposed route between the state line and US 58 bypass that I-73 is proposed to follow as one of the alternatives. Who knows. Either way.. good for them to focus on segments. That is what should have been done the first place.

http://martinsvilledaily.com/2018/02/28/environmental-impact-statement-and-70-million-pledged-toward-i-73-from/
« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 11:45:06 AM by Strider »
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Beltway

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #331 on: February 28, 2018, 04:15:40 PM »

No, I-73 is not dead. The state has a very, very and very long way to go on building I-73, and the EIS must be conducted first before the Corps can approve the permit. The Corps asked for a updated study since the last one was done back in 2006. (it is not cheap to do a EIS).
However, Martinsville City Council will remain a part of the Interstate 73 Coalition after a 4-1 vote.
While they are at it, the FHA announced a study that will focus on US 220 between NC state line and Martinsville bypass. They hope to have the study complete by 2021. The study could include the proposed route between the state line and US 58 bypass that I-73 is proposed to follow as one of the alternatives. Who knows. Either way.. good for them to focus on segments. That is what should have been done the first place.

I question what the article said.  The project had a completed NEPA process with approved Final EIS and ROD.  An EIS Re-evaulation shouldn't take more than a year or two.  Neither the human nor the natural environment has changed much since 2006.

US-220 between N.C. and the Martinsville Bypass is already 4-lane rural arterial highway, and it has a bypass of Ridgeway.  I do not see any special priority for that I-73 segment, the approved alignment in Virginia ties into existing US-220 at the state border, so US-220 can continue to serve that need for now.
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Strider

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #332 on: February 28, 2018, 05:50:11 PM »

No, I-73 is not dead. The state has a very, very and very long way to go on building I-73, and the EIS must be conducted first before the Corps can approve the permit. The Corps asked for a updated study since the last one was done back in 2006. (it is not cheap to do a EIS).
However, Martinsville City Council will remain a part of the Interstate 73 Coalition after a 4-1 vote.
While they are at it, the FHA announced a study that will focus on US 220 between NC state line and Martinsville bypass. They hope to have the study complete by 2021. The study could include the proposed route between the state line and US 58 bypass that I-73 is proposed to follow as one of the alternatives. Who knows. Either way.. good for them to focus on segments. That is what should have been done the first place.

I question what the article said.  The project had a completed NEPA process with approved Final EIS and ROD.  An EIS Re-evaulation shouldn't take more than a year or two.  Neither the human nor the natural environment has changed much since 2006.

US-220 between N.C. and the Martinsville Bypass is already 4-lane rural arterial highway, and it has a bypass of Ridgeway.  I do not see any special priority for that I-73 segment, the approved alignment in Virginia ties into existing US-220 at the state border, so US-220 can continue to serve that need for now.


Since you live in Virginia, why don't you find out?
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Strider

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #333 on: February 28, 2018, 05:50:55 PM »

No, I-73 is not dead. The state has a very, very and very long way to go on building I-73, and the EIS must be conducted first before the Corps can approve the permit. The Corps asked for a updated study since the last one was done back in 2006. (it is not cheap to do a EIS).
However, Martinsville City Council will remain a part of the Interstate 73 Coalition after a 4-1 vote.
While they are at it, the FHA announced a study that will focus on US 220 between NC state line and Martinsville bypass. They hope to have the study complete by 2021. The study could include the proposed route between the state line and US 58 bypass that I-73 is proposed to follow as one of the alternatives. Who knows. Either way.. good for them to focus on segments. That is what should have been done the first place.

I question what the article said.  The project had a completed NEPA process with approved Final EIS and ROD.  An EIS Re-evaulation shouldn't take more than a year or two.  Neither the human nor the natural environment has changed much since 2006.

US-220 between N.C. and the Martinsville Bypass is already 4-lane rural arterial highway, and it has a bypass of Ridgeway.  I do not see any special priority for that I-73 segment, the approved alignment in Virginia ties into existing US-220 at the state border, so US-220 can continue to serve that need for now.


Since you live in Virginia, why don't you find out?


Another update:

http://www.wdbj7.com/content/news/Plans-for-Interstate-73-moving-forward-with-environmental-study-475458533.html
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Beltway

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #334 on: February 28, 2018, 05:53:51 PM »

Quote from: Beltway
I question what the article said.  The project had a completed NEPA process with approved Final EIS and ROD.  An EIS Re-evaulation shouldn't take more than a year or two.  Neither the human nor the natural environment has changed much since 2006.
US-220 between N.C. and the Martinsville Bypass is already 4-lane rural arterial highway, and it has a bypass of Ridgeway.  I do not see any special priority for that I-73 segment, the approved alignment in Virginia ties into existing US-220 at the state border, so US-220 can continue to serve that need for now.

Since you live in Virginia, why don't you find out?

Find out what?  I didn't pose any questions.
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Strider

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #335 on: February 28, 2018, 05:59:02 PM »

Quote from: Beltway
I question what the article said.  The project had a completed NEPA process with approved Final EIS and ROD.  An EIS Re-evaulation shouldn't take more than a year or two.  Neither the human nor the natural environment has changed much since 2006.
US-220 between N.C. and the Martinsville Bypass is already 4-lane rural arterial highway, and it has a bypass of Ridgeway.  I do not see any special priority for that I-73 segment, the approved alignment in Virginia ties into existing US-220 at the state border, so US-220 can continue to serve that need for now.

Since you live in Virginia, why don't you find out?

Find out what?  I didn't pose any questions.


You didn't have to directly pose any questions.

"I question what the article said....."

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Beltway

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #336 on: February 28, 2018, 06:12:38 PM »

Quote from: Beltway
I question what the article said.  The project had a completed NEPA process with approved Final EIS and ROD.  An EIS Re-evaulation shouldn't take more than a year or two.  Neither the human nor the natural environment has changed much since 2006.
US-220 between N.C. and the Martinsville Bypass is already 4-lane rural arterial highway, and it has a bypass of Ridgeway.  I do not see any special priority for that I-73 segment, the approved alignment in Virginia ties into existing US-220 at the state border, so US-220 can continue to serve that need for now.
Since you live in Virginia, why don't you find out?
Find out what?  I didn't pose any questions.
You didn't have to directly pose any questions.
"I question what the article said....."

Because in my knowledge an EIS Re-evaulation shouldn't take 5 or 6 years to complete.
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LM117

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #337 on: February 28, 2018, 06:27:42 PM »

Another update:

http://www.wdbj7.com/content/news/Plans-for-Interstate-73-moving-forward-with-environmental-study-475458533.html

Quote
Stirrup said he is delighted Roanoke County is going to continue on with the coalition.

“Obviously if they had voted against us, it would have sent a very negative message to the other coalition partners and probably would lead to others perhaps dropping out in the future as well. But it's important to remain solidarity on this issue."

The coalition is made up of Roanoke, Franklin, and Henry counties along with the Cities of Martinsville and Roanoke.

I hate to break it to Stirrup, but Henry County has already dropped out of the coalition. So much for solidarity...
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Strider

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #338 on: March 01, 2018, 10:24:48 AM »

Another update:

http://www.wdbj7.com/content/news/Plans-for-Interstate-73-moving-forward-with-environmental-study-475458533.html

Quote
Stirrup said he is delighted Roanoke County is going to continue on with the coalition.

“Obviously if they had voted against us, it would have sent a very negative message to the other coalition partners and probably would lead to others perhaps dropping out in the future as well. But it's important to remain solidarity on this issue."

The coalition is made up of Roanoke, Franklin, and Henry counties along with the Cities of Martinsville and Roanoke.

I hate to break it to Stirrup, but Henry County has already dropped out of the coalition. So much for solidarity...


Yeah, Henry County is the only one that dropped out... Martinsville City and Roanoke County are still in. I don't know about Franklin County (assuming they are still in)
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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #339 on: March 01, 2018, 04:05:02 PM »

Of course Roanoke (city & county) are still in the coalition; the whole notion of shifting a branch of the HPC 5 corridor east to serve the area began there some 23 years ago (otherwise most of what's known as I-74 in NC would be I-73 instead).  It's ironic that the area that originally pressed hardest for that specific corridor would have the most difficult time getting it built -- perhaps it was just lack of self-awareness regarding the particulars of VA politics and funding on the part of the backers -- while their neighbor to the south, displaying a completely different package of priorities, hacks away at their portion of I-73 until it's about 85% done within the state.  Oh well -- maybe just enough of the corridor will get completed to function as a gateway to the Martinsville Speedway.     
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Strider

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #340 on: March 01, 2018, 04:34:16 PM »

Of course Roanoke (city & county) are still in the coalition; the whole notion of shifting a branch of the HPC 5 corridor east to serve the area began there some 23 years ago (otherwise most of what's known as I-74 in NC would be I-73 instead).  It's ironic that the area that originally pressed hardest for that specific corridor would have the most difficult time getting it built -- perhaps it was just lack of self-awareness regarding the particulars of VA politics and funding on the part of the backers -- while their neighbor to the south, displaying a completely different package of priorities, hacks away at their portion of I-73 until it's about 85% done within the state.  Oh well -- maybe just enough of the corridor will get completed to function as a gateway to the Martinsville Speedway.   

I guess we shall see what happens after the EIS is completed. From that point on, we all should know what's up.
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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #341 on: March 01, 2018, 06:17:23 PM »

The Henry County Board of Supervisors will vote tomorrow on whether or not to remain in the I-73 Coalition.

http://www.martinsvillebulletin.com/news/should-henry-county-stay-in-the-i--coalition/article_5b0f7bf8-1a81-11e8-bf4b-7bce5b55ae77.html

Meanwhile, due to a tied vote, Henry County has left the I-73 Coalition.

http://www.martinsvillebulletin.com/news/henry-county-supervisors-split-on-i--coalition/article_ff63dd68-1c37-11e8-a211-6f70952e5844.html
What about Franklin County? I have been on US 220 many times between Roanoke and Martinsville. I really don't get why it should get an interstate upgrade. There are other highways that interstate upgrades would make more sense like OH 32 and US 31 in northern Indiana.
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Beltway

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #342 on: March 01, 2018, 06:46:53 PM »

Of course Roanoke (city & county) are still in the coalition; the whole notion of shifting a branch of the HPC 5 corridor east to serve the area began there some 23 years ago (otherwise most of what's known as I-74 in NC would be I-73 instead).  It's ironic that the area that originally pressed hardest for that specific corridor would have the most difficult time getting it built -- perhaps it was just lack of self-awareness regarding the particulars of VA politics and funding on the part of the backers -- while their neighbor to the south, displaying a completely different package of priorities, hacks away at their portion of I-73 until it's about 85% done within the state.  Oh well -- maybe just enough of the corridor will get completed to function as a gateway to the Martinsville Speedway.     

How much has the N.C. part cost, has it reached a billion in total?  As I have pointed out many times the portion between N.C. and I-81 is estimated at $4 billion.

Nearly all of US-220 in N.C. was a 2-lane highway that went thru towns.  Building a full relocation made sense, starting in the 1980s with US-220 freeway segments and then with I-73 segments after that was authorized in 1995.

The US-220 segment in Virginia is a capable 4-lane highway with town bypasses and it uses the 6-lane I-581/US-220 freeway in Roanoke, and about 30% of the total 70-mile segment is on limited access right-of-way.  It was all completed by 1980, the early parts in the 1960s.  I would like to see the I-73 route built in the future even if it takes to 2030 or beyond.  But understand why the priority is far lower than that of N.C., considering the quality of the original NC US-220 route.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2018, 07:34:40 PM by Beltway »
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Beltway

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #343 on: March 01, 2018, 07:35:56 PM »

What about Franklin County? I have been on US 220 many times between Roanoke and Martinsville. I really don't get why it should get an interstate upgrade. There are other highways that interstate upgrades would make more sense like OH 32 and US 31 in northern Indiana.

US-220 volume ranges by section rounded --
NC to US-58 -- 12,000 AADT
Martinsville to Rocky Mount -- 16,000 AADT
Rocky Mount to VA-419 -- 24,000 AADT
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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #344 on: March 01, 2018, 07:54:05 PM »

The Henry County Board of Supervisors will vote tomorrow on whether or not to remain in the I-73 Coalition.

http://www.martinsvillebulletin.com/news/should-henry-county-stay-in-the-i--coalition/article_5b0f7bf8-1a81-11e8-bf4b-7bce5b55ae77.html

Meanwhile, due to a tied vote, Henry County has left the I-73 Coalition.

http://www.martinsvillebulletin.com/news/henry-county-supervisors-split-on-i--coalition/article_ff63dd68-1c37-11e8-a211-6f70952e5844.html
What about Franklin County? I have been on US 220 many times between Roanoke and Martinsville. I really don't get why it should get an interstate upgrade. There are other highways that interstate upgrades would make more sense like OH 32 and US 31 in northern Indiana.


No idea about Franklin County yet. We will know something as soon as the update comes.

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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #345 on: March 01, 2018, 10:32:45 PM »

What about Franklin County? I have been on US 220 many times between Roanoke and Martinsville. I really don't get why it should get an interstate upgrade. There are other highways that interstate upgrades would make more sense like OH 32 and US 31 in northern Indiana.

Well, it's state money being spent -- or the state's allocation of federal money -- so each state gets to set its own priorities. US 220 isn't competing with Ohio or Indiana for upgrade funds. But I disagree about OH 32 and US 31 needing to be interstates. They, like US 220, are just fine as surface arterial four-lanes.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2018, 09:54:06 PM by hbelkins »
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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #346 on: March 02, 2018, 09:56:31 AM »

The US-220 segment in Virginia is a capable 4-lane highway with town bypasses and it uses the 6-lane I-581/US-220 freeway in Roanoke, and about 30% of the total 70-mile segment is on limited access right-of-way.  It was all completed by 1980, the early parts in the 1960s.  I would like to see the I-73 route built in the future even if it takes to 2030 or beyond.  But understand why the priority is far lower than that of N.C., considering the quality of the original NC US-220 route.

Yes it is a four-lane highway but to claim it is "capable" is a bit of a stretch. There are large sections that are more than adequate for the traffic, but there are also some sections that downgrade any trip on the highway. There are some nasty horizontal and vertical curves, narrow and non-existent shoulders, and pretty much the whole section from VA 419 to the other side of Boones Mill (the on-again/off-again speed trap depending on the small-town politics and the state of the "police" department) is fraught with problems. While not as bad as the "wreck a day" I-81, U.S. 220 in that Roanoke/Boones Mill section has its share of bad tractor-trailer accidents -- many of which close the road for hours at a time and offer no alternative routes around the mess.

There is no easy solution to the problem, since there are too many side roads, businesses, and driveways in various sections that would block an upgrade in place (if the desire is to change the road to an interstate). Back when the whole discussion started, there were a number of routes offered to take care of the difficulty of getting south out of Roanoke and just about all of them were panned by various parties (lots and lots of NIMBYs). Even if bags of money were to fall from the sky offering unlimited funds for I-73 construction, it would take years to resolve all the issues.

Bruce in Blacksburg
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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #347 on: March 02, 2018, 09:58:49 AM »

What about Franklin County? I have been on US 220 many times between Roanoke and Martinsville. I really don't get why it should get an interstate upgrade. There are other highways that interstate upgrades would make more sense like OH 32 and US 31 in northern Indiana.

Well, it's state money being spent -- or the state's allocation of federal money -- so each state gets to set its own priorities. US 220 isn't competing with Ohio or Indiana for upgrade funds. But I disagree about OH 32 and US 31 needing to be interstates. They, like US 220, are just fine as surface arterial four-lanes.
[/quote]

Upgrading for the sake of upgrading, that's what it is. And the same can be said about US 52 in WV, another highway that I-73 and I-74 have been planned to run on for years.
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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #348 on: March 02, 2018, 10:43:33 AM »

Yes it is a four-lane highway but to claim it is "capable" is a bit of a stretch. There are large sections that are more than adequate for the traffic, but there are also some sections that downgrade any trip on the highway. There are some nasty horizontal and vertical curves, narrow and non-existent shoulders, and pretty much the whole section from VA 419 to the other side of Boones Mill (the on-again/off-again speed trap depending on the small-town politics and the state of the "police" department) is fraught with problems. While not as bad as the "wreck a day" I-81, U.S. 220 in that Roanoke/Boones Mill section has its share of bad tractor-trailer accidents -- many of which close the road for hours at a time and offer no alternative routes around the mess.
There is no easy solution to the problem, since there are too many side roads, businesses, and driveways in various sections that would block an upgrade in place (if the desire is to change the road to an interstate). Back when the whole discussion started, there were a number of routes offered to take care of the difficulty of getting south out of Roanoke and just about all of them were panned by various parties (lots and lots of NIMBYs). Even if bags of money were to fall from the sky offering unlimited funds for I-73 construction, it would take years to resolve all the issues.
Bruce in Blacksburg

The nonlimited-access portions were 4-laned between 1953 and 1971 per the Virginia Highways Project.  From Boones Mill to Roanoke in 1953, and that section certainly has aged into obsolescence  and that would be the segment to get priority for the first segment of I-73.

Fixing horizontal and vertical curves and narrow shoulders IMO should be considered on the existing route as long as they aren't so expensive to fix that it might be no more so to bypass it entirely.
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Re: I-73 in VA
« Reply #349 on: March 02, 2018, 11:04:49 AM »

The US-220 segment in Virginia is a capable 4-lane highway with town bypasses and it uses the 6-lane I-581/US-220 freeway in Roanoke, and about 30% of the total 70-mile segment is on limited access right-of-way.  It was all completed by 1980, the early parts in the 1960s.  I would like to see the I-73 route built in the future even if it takes to 2030 or beyond.  But understand why the priority is far lower than that of N.C., considering the quality of the original NC US-220 route.

Yes it is a four-lane highway but to claim it is "capable" is a bit of a stretch. There are large sections that are more than adequate for the traffic, but there are also some sections that downgrade any trip on the highway. There are some nasty horizontal and vertical curves, narrow and non-existent shoulders, and pretty much the whole section from VA 419 to the other side of Boones Mill (the on-again/off-again speed trap depending on the small-town politics and the state of the "police" department) is fraught with problems. While not as bad as the "wreck a day" I-81, U.S. 220 in that Roanoke/Boones Mill section has its share of bad tractor-trailer accidents -- many of which close the road for hours at a time and offer no alternative routes around the mess.




THIS.

Those of you who drives on US 220 EVERYDAY (like I do) knows what it is like. To say that the highway is "capable" is meaningless if you don't drive on it everyday. Drive on it EVERYDAY and you will get a different opinion.
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