AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Regional television markets  (Read 32246 times)

ThatRandomOshawott

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 26
  • Last Login: September 12, 2019, 11:15:15 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #125 on: April 08, 2018, 04:42:57 PM »

Calloway County, KY has an interesting situation with its stations. It is officially in the Paducah/Cape Girardeau/Harrisburg market, but its cable stations get the Big Three Nashville stations. In addition, until recently, they got WBBJ from Jackson.

Is that instead of, or in addition to, the local market stations?
The cable networks get Nashville's stations (and formerly WBBJ) in addition to the Paducah/Cape Girardeau/Harrisburg stations.

What about satellite? Do you know?
They only get the Paducah/Cape Girardeau/Harrisburg stations.
As a side note, back in the days of analog, in the eastern area of the county, you could only get WSIL, WSMV, WTVF, and WPSD. You could not get KFVS.
Logged

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3037
  • Last Login: March 29, 2020, 10:44:48 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #126 on: April 12, 2018, 12:20:36 PM »

Interesting that Palm Springs DMA on the Nielsen Map does not include east Riverside County. It's interesting that Central Riverside county gets a different DMA designation while West and East Riverside County get the Los Angeles TV Stations.
Logged

ftballfan

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1317
  • Age: 28
  • Location: Ypsilanti, MI
  • Last Login: March 29, 2020, 10:10:59 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #127 on: April 12, 2018, 11:51:47 PM »

Interesting that Palm Springs DMA on the Nielsen Map does not include east Riverside County. It's interesting that Central Riverside county gets a different DMA designation while West and East Riverside County get the Los Angeles TV Stations.

The Palm Springs stations are extremely weak and can't reach Blythe (which is basically all that eastern Riverside County contains). Speaking of Blythe, the local cable system carries a mix of Los Angeles and Phoenix stations, with one or two coming from Yuma (which is much closer to Blythe than either LA or Phoenix).
Logged

Life in Paradise

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 289
  • Location: Indiana
  • Last Login: March 28, 2020, 03:36:36 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #128 on: April 14, 2018, 01:02:35 PM »

Interesting that Palm Springs DMA on the Nielsen Map does not include east Riverside County. It's interesting that Central Riverside county gets a different DMA designation while West and East Riverside County get the Los Angeles TV Stations.

The Palm Springs stations are extremely weak and can't reach Blythe (which is basically all that eastern Riverside County contains). Speaking of Blythe, the local cable system carries a mix of Los Angeles and Phoenix stations, with one or two coming from Yuma (which is much closer to Blythe than either LA or Phoenix).
It is kind of understandable why Palm Springs TV can't make it to Blythe.  It is almost 100 miles between the two by air and there are a couple of mountain ranges between the two (Chuckwalla and Palen).  I'd guess when getting signals for the cable system, it was voted to go with the big time LA stations rather than the little time localls in Palm Springs.
Logged

Nanis

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 78
  • acerbic

  • Location: Philadelphia, PA
  • Last Login: April 06, 2019, 11:46:25 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #129 on: April 14, 2018, 07:17:29 PM »

Interesting that Palm Springs DMA on the Nielsen Map does not include east Riverside County. It's interesting that Central Riverside county gets a different DMA designation while West and East Riverside County get the Los Angeles TV Stations.

The Palm Springs stations are extremely weak and can't reach Blythe (which is basically all that eastern Riverside County contains). Speaking of Blythe, the local cable system carries a mix of Los Angeles and Phoenix stations, with one or two coming from Yuma (which is much closer to Blythe than either LA or Phoenix).
Who even cares about Blythe? It only has 20,000 or so people. Also I always thought that eastern Riverside county was served by Phoenix only

 
Logged
Map of state roads I have taken pictures for the signs for can be seen here (although four routes ave not been added yet because of their lengths.):
https://www.scribblemaps.com/maps/view/us_route_map/s7vYO7rC80

bugo

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6136
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Oklahoma
  • Last Login: Today at 06:40:19 AM
    • No Frills Blog
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #130 on: April 15, 2018, 04:36:07 PM »

Mena, Arkansas is surrounded by rugged terrain and it is hard to get a good signal from any of the TV stations. When I was a kid, many households could only get KFSM-TV, channel 5, out of Fort Smith. Before cable TV, there was an antenna up on Rich Mountain and you could purchase "cable" TV which was basically just a cable that connected to the antenna. I think the antenna is still there but I don't know if it is still used to bring in TV signals or not. I also don't know if digital signals from any stations are able to be picked up using an over the air antenna. I live in the middle of Tulsa and I can't get some of the local stations, and the terrain is fairly flat and most of the antennas are in Oneta, which is maybe 20 miles from me.
Logged
This signature has been censored by the AARoads Bureau of Morality.

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3037
  • Last Login: March 29, 2020, 10:44:48 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #131 on: April 15, 2018, 05:18:46 PM »

http://eyesofageneration.com/april-19-1948-the-start-of-the-abc-television-network68-years-ago-today-on/

Here is an interesting one WFIL-TV/WPVI Philadelphia and WMAL/WJLA-TV Washington D.C. have been ABC Affiliates months before ABC started their O&O's from August 1948-1949.
Logged

bandit957

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1965
  • A natural gas bunk!

  • Age: 46
  • Location: Bellevue, KY
  • Last Login: Today at 12:10:58 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #132 on: April 15, 2018, 06:14:19 PM »

Mena, Arkansas is surrounded by rugged terrain and it is hard to get a good signal from any of the TV stations. When I was a kid, many households could only get KFSM-TV, channel 5, out of Fort Smith. Before cable TV, there was an antenna up on Rich Mountain and you could purchase "cable" TV which was basically just a cable that connected to the antenna. I think the antenna is still there but I don't know if it is still used to bring in TV signals or not. I also don't know if digital signals from any stations are able to be picked up using an over the air antenna. I live in the middle of Tulsa and I can't get some of the local stations, and the terrain is fairly flat and most of the antennas are in Oneta, which is maybe 20 miles from me.

I remember seeing maps that had the whole country divided into TV markets, and I did notice Polk County was in the Little Rock market. I thought that was strange, since it's much closer to Fort Smith.
Logged
Pooing is cool

Nanis

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 78
  • acerbic

  • Location: Philadelphia, PA
  • Last Login: April 06, 2019, 11:46:25 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #133 on: April 15, 2018, 06:25:30 PM »

I don't know how but I can't get my ABC station. What is even odder is that people in my neighborhood get it with antennas.
Logged
Map of state roads I have taken pictures for the signs for can be seen here (although four routes ave not been added yet because of their lengths.):
https://www.scribblemaps.com/maps/view/us_route_map/s7vYO7rC80

Nanis

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 78
  • acerbic

  • Location: Philadelphia, PA
  • Last Login: April 06, 2019, 11:46:25 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #134 on: April 15, 2018, 06:31:45 PM »

Mena, Arkansas is surrounded by rugged terrain and it is hard to get a good signal from any of the TV stations. When I was a kid, many households could only get KFSM-TV, channel 5, out of Fort Smith. Before cable TV, there was an antenna up on Rich Mountain and you could purchase "cable" TV which was basically just a cable that connected to the antenna. I think the antenna is still there but I don't know if it is still used to bring in TV signals or not. I also don't know if digital signals from any stations are able to be picked up using an over the air antenna. I live in the middle of Tulsa and I can't get some of the local stations, and the terrain is fairly flat and most of the antennas are in Oneta, which is maybe 20 miles from me.

I remember seeing maps that had the whole country divided into TV markets, and I did notice Polk County was in the Little Rock market. I thought that was strange, since it's much closer to Fort Smith.
Those maps are quite inaccurate due to age. The younger it is, the more accurate it is This is due to the fact that the counties "flip flop" from market to market.
Logged
Map of state roads I have taken pictures for the signs for can be seen here (although four routes ave not been added yet because of their lengths.):
https://www.scribblemaps.com/maps/view/us_route_map/s7vYO7rC80

SP Cook

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 2034
  • Last Login: Today at 12:17:19 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #135 on: April 16, 2018, 09:43:51 AM »

I remember seeing maps that had the whole country divided into TV markets, and I did notice Polk County was in the Little Rock market. I thought that was strange, since it's much closer to Fort Smith.

Those maps are copyright by the Nielsen company and they are VERY defensive of it.  Posts of the maps get taken down quickly. 

With trivial exceptions, the maps are based strictly on county lines and are based on which town's stations are watched the most in that county.  They can change every year, and lots of factors can change them.  Small markets, which do not have "all" four networks tend to get squeezed.  Often a change can come down to the preferences of the handful of Nielsen "families" in a rural county from one year's survey to the next. 

Market size is important to broadcast companies, because ad buyers pay based on it, ignoring the survey errors.  Stations do lots of things to keep rural counties on their borders.  In my area, the Huntington - Charleston stations grossly over-cover goings on in Athens county, Ohio and of Ohio University, in order to keep it in their market.  The Columbus stations, also receivable there, do not care because their market is large enough already.  They are also careful to cover the geographically huge (largest in Kentucky, I think) Pike county, because the terrain makes OTA TV pretty difficult and depending on what part you are in the closest set of TV stations can be one of four posibilities. 
Logged

bandit957

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1965
  • A natural gas bunk!

  • Age: 46
  • Location: Bellevue, KY
  • Last Login: Today at 12:10:58 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #136 on: April 16, 2018, 10:19:45 AM »

Market size is important to broadcast companies, because ad buyers pay based on it, ignoring the survey errors.  Stations do lots of things to keep rural counties on their borders.  In my area, the Huntington - Charleston stations grossly over-cover goings on in Athens county, Ohio and of Ohio University, in order to keep it in their market.  The Columbus stations, also receivable there, do not care because their market is large enough already.  They are also careful to cover the geographically huge (largest in Kentucky, I think) Pike county, because the terrain makes OTA TV pretty difficult and depending on what part you are in the closest set of TV stations can be one of four posibilities.

I don't know how over-the-air reception in Pike County or Athens County is even possible, since I can't even get all the Cincinnati stations anymore, even though I'm only a couple miles from Cincinnati.
Logged
Pooing is cool

Nanis

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 78
  • acerbic

  • Location: Philadelphia, PA
  • Last Login: April 06, 2019, 11:46:25 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #137 on: April 20, 2018, 07:45:51 PM »

I still don't get how Mercer county is part of my market.
Logged
Map of state roads I have taken pictures for the signs for can be seen here (although four routes ave not been added yet because of their lengths.):
https://www.scribblemaps.com/maps/view/us_route_map/s7vYO7rC80

1

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 7642
  • UMass Lowell student

  • Age: 21
  • Location: MA/NH border
  • Last Login: Today at 12:19:51 PM
    • Flickr account
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #138 on: April 20, 2018, 07:56:43 PM »

I still don't get how Mercer county is part of my market.

Assuming you mean Mercer County, NJ and not Mercer County, PA, it's reasonable; Trenton doesn't have its own market.
Logged
Clinched

Traveled, plus
US ⒔50
MA ⒐2⒉40.9⒐10⒎10⒐1⒒1⒚12⒎14⒈159
NH 27,38,111A(E),128; CA133; NY366; GA 42,140; FL A1A; CT32; VT 5A; QC 16⒉16⒌263

Flickr: Click the globe under my avatar

Nanis

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 78
  • acerbic

  • Location: Philadelphia, PA
  • Last Login: April 06, 2019, 11:46:25 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #139 on: April 20, 2018, 08:28:30 PM »

I still don't get how Mercer county is part of my market.

Assuming you mean Mercer County, NJ and not Mercer County, PA, it's reasonable; Trenton doesn't have its own market.
I know that much, but why is it not part of the NYC market?
Logged
Map of state roads I have taken pictures for the signs for can be seen here (although four routes ave not been added yet because of their lengths.):
https://www.scribblemaps.com/maps/view/us_route_map/s7vYO7rC80

KEVIN_224

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1842
  • Age: 49
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Last Login: Today at 09:41:44 AM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #140 on: April 20, 2018, 08:45:52 PM »

Probably because it's physically closer to Philadelphia and that Pennsylvania is on the other side of the river? I've seen ads for WPVI-TV (ABC) channel 6 at Arm & Hammer Field more than once.

Logged

Desert Man

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 831
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Sou Cal USA
  • Last Login: October 13, 2019, 07:46:46 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #141 on: April 29, 2018, 11:55:33 PM »

Interesting that Palm Springs DMA on the Nielsen Map does not include east Riverside County. It's interesting that Central Riverside county gets a different DMA designation while West and East Riverside County get the Los Angeles TV Stations.

I recalled when channel 13 (KBLU/KYEL/KSWT) and channel 9 (KECY) was somewhat on air in Indio-Coachella CA, but on a non-Daylight "Mountain Time" schedule. You need a good antennae to receive a second ABC, CBS or NBC affiliate, along with Palm Springs' KPLM/KESQ (always ABC) and KMIR (always NBC). In the 1970s, 3 LA TV and 1 San Diego TV station had low-watt transmitters in Palm Springs, but didn't quite reach Indio. If you're in between the two cities, you had 3 "big 3" and a PBS station (KVCR 24 from Riverside-San Bernardino) and Spanish either from KMEX Los Angeles or XHBC Mexicali. 
Logged
Get your kicks...on Route 99! Like to turn 66 upside down. The other historic Main street of America.

Desert Man

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 831
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Sou Cal USA
  • Last Login: October 13, 2019, 07:46:46 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #142 on: April 30, 2018, 10:21:53 PM »

3 things about the Palm Springs DMA is 1. it's among the smallest in size (35 mile radius from Palm Springs to reach Hemet, Morongo Basin and the Salton Sea), 2. smallest in population (the bottom 50) and 3. existed for only 50 years (1968) when KMIR and KPLM, later KESQ went on the air. In the 1950s, Palm Springs was the test site of the world's first pay-premium TV known as Telemeter which had 7 big LA TV stations and a movie channel, but the local theater managed to get that shut down within one year.
Logged
Get your kicks...on Route 99! Like to turn 66 upside down. The other historic Main street of America.

bing101

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3037
  • Last Login: March 29, 2020, 10:44:48 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #143 on: May 03, 2018, 01:17:39 PM »

Logged

SP Cook

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 2034
  • Last Login: Today at 12:17:19 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #144 on: May 03, 2018, 01:44:13 PM »

Gray is, IMHO, a good TV station owner.  They usually are the ratings leader in local news, because they try harder.  They tend to keep politics out of their news.  They try to be involved in the community, have outreach programs and give tours to school kids. 

Sinclair, BTW, has doubled down on the stupid trying to get its merger with Tribune approved.  For those of you who don't know, federal law prevents any one company from owning stations in more than 39% of the country or more than one of the "big 4" stations in any one market.  Sinclair has a group of dummy companies owned by shills (two of which are currently dead) to bypass these limits.  With the FCC and FTC looking to turn down its purchase of Tribune, it released a list of stations it will "sell".  The its own shills.

Logged

hbelkins

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 14173
  • It is well, it is well, with my soul.

  • Age: 58
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Last Login: March 29, 2020, 11:16:38 PM
    • Millennium Highway
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #145 on: May 03, 2018, 02:44:48 PM »

Gray is, IMHO, a good TV station owner.  They usually are the ratings leader in local news, because they try harder.  They tend to keep politics out of their news.  They try to be involved in the community, have outreach programs and give tours to school kids. 

WYMT-TV in Hazard is a Gray station, and they really do an excellent job with community outreach and being involved. Their sister station WKYT in Lexington is also a Gray station, and Gray owns a station in Knoxville and the Huntington/Charleston market as well, but I can't think of their affiliations (WKYT and WYMT are CBS affiliates.)

There are a number of commenters on WKYT and WYMT's websites and Facebook pages who would disagree with that "no politics" observation. I've seen both stations frequently described as being too liberal.
Logged

SP Cook

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 2034
  • Last Login: Today at 12:17:19 PM
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #146 on: May 03, 2018, 03:23:24 PM »

Their Huntington station is WSAZ, which is NBC.  Since ratings started in 1968, it has never had a local news rating lower than double all other stations combined.  They also own the local CW channel, which has a WSAZ produced 10:00 news show. 

Yes, in national politics, most all TV stations, including Gray's and Sinclair's, are at the conspiracy theorist left edge, when they do national coverage.  This goes without saying.  However in local politics around here, WSAZ tends to look at both sides of things.  This is a huge contrast to Charleston and Huntington 's extremist left newspapers; and to the other local stations which are Sinclair's illegally owned Fox/ABC combination which is in the pocket of the Charleston courthouse gang and are more or less a PR agency for their goofy development plans and the previous owners of the CBS, which was a shill for the pure evil Goodwin/Rockefeller political crime family.  Nextstar just bought the place out of quasi-bankruptcy, but really has not yet made any significant staff changes.  Nobody takes either of the other two TV stations' reporting seriously. 

                                                                                     
Logged

vdeane

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 10890
  • Age: 29
  • Location: Latham, NY
  • Last Login: March 29, 2020, 09:17:22 PM
    • New York State Roads
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #147 on: May 03, 2018, 07:55:12 PM »

If FOX/ABC combos are illegal, then there are a LOT of places in violation.  Nextar owns both the ABC and FOX stations here in Albany.  This does allow for there to be a LOT of local news in the evening; the ABC station carries 4-6:30, and 11-11:35, with FOX carrying 7-7:30 and 10-11.

On another note, I find it hard to consider a company that forces its stations to air segments where the CEO complains about snowflakes and social justice warriors to be "conspiracy theorist left".  Unless you meant the "world" news, which comes from the main network rather than Sinclair.
Logged
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position of NYSDOT or its affiliates.

bugo

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6136
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Oklahoma
  • Last Login: Today at 06:40:19 AM
    • No Frills Blog
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #148 on: May 03, 2018, 10:30:39 PM »

There are a number of commenters on WKYT and WYMT's websites and Facebook pages who would disagree with that "no politics" observation. I've seen both stations frequently described as being too liberal.

To you, HB, anything to the left of Sputnik News, Russia Times or Breitbart is "too liberal". I wouldn't be surprised if you called Fox News a part of the "liberal media". It's all about perspectives.
Logged
This signature has been censored by the AARoads Bureau of Morality.

bugo

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6136
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Oklahoma
  • Last Login: Today at 06:40:19 AM
    • No Frills Blog
Re: Regional television markets
« Reply #149 on: May 03, 2018, 10:31:51 PM »

Sinclair is a propaganda arm of the Republican Party. It is the American version of the Soviet era Pravda newspaper.
Logged
This signature has been censored by the AARoads Bureau of Morality.

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.