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Author Topic: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.  (Read 4690 times)

Tonytone

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #50 on: November 19, 2018, 10:44:30 PM »

https://www.delawareonline.com/story/news/2018/11/13/95-neighbors-wilmington-want-roof-over-highway/1987141002/

Seems residents are having the same thoughts that we were just talking about, not to long ago.


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Tonytone

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #51 on: November 17, 2019, 03:08:24 PM »

https://deldot.gov/public.ejs?command=PublicProjectPortalDocument&iDID=1871803&iProjectObjectID=48898

Map of the Major projects happening in the area including the biggest project I-95. Looking at the section that goes thru Wilmington, that is about the size of the park Philly is putting over I-95 aka the CAP.

IMO if Delaware were to atleast prepare for that to be done in the future will doing this upcoming construction project it would probably push the city of Wilmington into a boom of people wanting to invest in it now that the middle of the city is connected once again. I could only imagine the amount of things the city could do after a cap is put through this section.
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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #52 on: November 18, 2019, 08:09:44 PM »

I just viewed this road on street level and a cap would be a great thing. Hopefully that gets done and included in the reconstruction project.

That said I am bewildered by two things (1) how a 200 million dollar project is considered “massive” in 2019 and (2) how on earth this stretch of freeway is only two GP thru lanes in each direction. Are they not even widening it to six?
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jeffandnicole

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #53 on: November 18, 2019, 10:10:52 PM »

I just viewed this road on street level and a cap would be a great thing. Hopefully that gets done and included in the reconstruction project.

That said I am bewildered by two things (1) how a 200 million dollar project is considered “massive” in 2019 and (2) how on earth this stretch of freeway is only two GP thru lanes in each direction. Are they not even widening it to six?

DelDOTs budget for FY20 is $367 million. Even if $200 million is allocated over a 3 year project, that's about 20% of their overall budget for a relatively small section of roadway.

495 was built specifically to allow traffic to bypass this narrow section of highway. Very little room to expand.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 10:14:25 PM by jeffandnicole »
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Rothman

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #54 on: November 19, 2019, 09:27:33 AM »

$200m would be considered a big project in NY.
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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #55 on: November 19, 2019, 09:49:28 AM »

Is because most projects here are then mass transit? Billion dollar projects are becoming fairly common in other states.

A suppose using the term “big” project could be appropriate here but “massive” placing emphasis on big seems excessive, IMO.
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jeffandnicole

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #56 on: November 19, 2019, 09:56:00 AM »

Is because most projects here are then mass transit? Billion dollar projects are becoming fairly common in other states.

A suppose using the term “big” project could be appropriate here but “massive” placing emphasis on big seems excessive, IMO.

I guess I wasn't clear above.  Maybe you're thinking of LA pricing.  But when a single project consumes 20% of your overall road funding, that is a big or massive project in terms of the overall budget.  Don't be terribly focused on the actual dollar amount.  If a small municipality had to spend $1 million when their annual budget is $2 million, that's a big expense for them.  For a big city, it's pocket change.
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Plutonic Panda

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #57 on: November 19, 2019, 10:14:50 AM »

^^^^ sorry I missed your post. That makes more sense though they would be able to do more if the feds provided more money.
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Beltway

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #58 on: November 19, 2019, 03:02:32 PM »

$200m would be considered a big project in NY.
Could they successfully manage a project that size?   :-/
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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #59 on: November 19, 2019, 05:53:55 PM »

How many reconstructions has Interstate 95 in Wilmington had since it was first constructed? It already seems to have had quite a few. Also, would it cause too many right-of-way impacts to make Interstate 95 consistently 6 lanes through Wilmington, like the 495 bypass is?
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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #60 on: November 19, 2019, 06:01:09 PM »

Looking at maps it seems like there is enough ROW for the most part. Apart from a handful of needed properties which really shouldn’t be an issue, as noted Delaware does not give too much money to its DOT and this project would likely carry billion + dollar price tag.
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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #61 on: December 13, 2019, 08:54:02 PM »

https://www.delawareonline.com/story/news/2018/11/13/95-neighbors-wilmington-want-roof-over-highway/1987141002/

Seems residents are having the same thoughts that we were just talking about, not to long ago.


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By not to long ago, were you thinking 2004? Because it was proposed by Wilmington Mayor James Baker back then. I have a brief summary on the I-95 Delaware Guide, which I posted back then based upon the May 12, 2004 News Journal article "Vision for Wilmington: Deck over I-95."

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #62 on: December 18, 2019, 11:55:59 PM »

https://www.delawareonline.com/story/news/2018/11/13/95-neighbors-wilmington-want-roof-over-highway/1987141002/

Seems residents are having the same thoughts that we were just talking about, not to long ago.


iPhone

By not to long ago, were you thinking 2004? Because it was proposed by Wilmington Mayor James Baker back then. I have a brief summary on the I-95 Delaware Guide, which I posted back then based upon the May 12, 2004 News Journal article "Vision for Wilmington: Deck over I-95."
I was talking about in this forum. We literally said they should cap I-95 & that News article came out probably a month after.


IMO with philly getting all the money together to finally cap their portion of I-95. Wilmington should be looking at doing the same.


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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #63 on: December 19, 2019, 05:45:07 AM »

How long, though, before the New Urbanists Kool-Aid their way in with the "We could save even MORE money if we just converted current Wilmington I-95 to a surface boulevard and rerouted I-95 around the city via I-495!!!! CARS SUCK!!! OUT!!!!" nonsense?
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ixnay

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #64 on: December 19, 2019, 08:38:41 AM »

How long, though, before the New Urbanists Kool-Aid their way in with the "We could save even MORE money if we just converted current Wilmington I-95 to a surface boulevard and rerouted I-95 around the city via I-495!!!! CARS SUCK!!! OUT!!!!" nonsense?

I think of an upstate NY city where there are plans to do something similar.  Call it "doing an 81" on [city name].  Which calls to mind this song...


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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #65 on: December 19, 2019, 10:59:22 AM »

How long, though, before the New Urbanists Kool-Aid their way in with the "We could save even MORE money if we just converted current Wilmington I-95 to a surface boulevard and rerouted I-95 around the city via I-495!!!! CARS SUCK!!! OUT!!!!" nonsense?
Such was considered for the Philly stretch as well but was thankfully stopped by the fact that the daily traffic counts for that particular stretch were well over 120,000-130,000 vehicles.  Both I-676 & 76, especially the 4-lane sections, in that area get gridlocked on a daily basis already; both roads would be hopelessly gridlocked 24/7 if that piece of I-95 was not in the picture.

However, unlike Philly, Wilmington does have the wider 6-lane I-495 within close proximity; so one advocating a highway removal advocate could use that as an argument.  Such a plan would mean that I-495 would be redesignated again as I-95. 

The big questions for such would be:

1.  What are the current daily traffic counts for I-95 through downtown Wilmington?

2.  How much of those fore-mentioned counts local/o&d traffic?

3.  Wouldn't the stakeholders, mainly the Riverfront venues, have a say on the matter? 
I mentioned such earlier either here or on the general Delaware thread that those venues rely on that portion of I-95 as a transportation means for their patrons, service & delivery vehicles.  The DART busses & SEPTA/Amtrak rail services in the area are woefully inadequate for such.
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jeffandnicole

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #66 on: December 19, 2019, 11:36:29 AM »

How long, though, before the New Urbanists Kool-Aid their way in with the "We could save even MORE money if we just converted current Wilmington I-95 to a surface boulevard and rerouted I-95 around the city via I-495!!!! CARS SUCK!!! OUT!!!!" nonsense?
Such was considered for the Philly stretch as well but was thankfully stopped by the fact that the daily traffic counts for that particular stretch were well over 120,000-130,000 vehicles.  Both I-676 & 76, especially the 4-lane sections, in that area get gridlocked on a daily basis already; both roads would be hopelessly gridlocked 24/7 if that piece of I-95 was not in the picture.

However, unlike Philly, Wilmington does have the wider 6-lane I-495 within close proximity; so one advocating a highway removal advocate could use that as an argument.  Such a plan would mean that I-495 would be redesignated again as I-95. 

The big questions for such would be:

1.  What are the current daily traffic counts for I-95 through downtown Wilmington?

2.  How much of those fore-mentioned counts local/o&d traffic?

3.  Wouldn't the stakeholders, mainly the Riverfront venues, have a say on the matter? 
I mentioned such earlier either here or on the general Delaware thread that those venues rely on that portion of I-95 as a transportation means for their patrons, service & delivery vehicles.  The DART busses & SEPTA/Amtrak rail services in the area are woefully inadequate for such.

I don't think there was any serious consideration for removing 95 in Philly by those that matter.  It was, and still is, a goal of anti-highway folks that don't necessary look at ADT numbers, but rather look and say that it's the least congested stretch of highway in the area, which is true because it was built properly to handle the amount of traffic expected.  Why these anti-highway people think that they can take 100,000+ vehicles and move them to 676, 76, and then a non-highway connection over the 35 mph Platt Bridge is a mind-boggling question.  This is also where they lose support.  They don't claim to want peds and bikes to share the road; they want peds and bikes to own the roads.  Reasonable proposals will give them room for negotiation.  Removing 95 completely is ridiculous.

As far as Wilmington goes, they probably simply don't have the united support of residents within the city to remove 95, or even to cap it.  Yes, it's been discussed off and on for years, but the cost of such a cap would probably be close to the annual budget for all of Delaware's roadways state-wide. 

The area of Wilmington that 95 directly affects is just a few blocks when it comes down to it, from around 4th Street to 9th Street.  On the face of it, it wouldn't be too hard to have 495 renumbered as 95 carry the thru traffic.  .  But I don't think Wilmington would be all that interested in losing one of the USA's highest profile highways thru their city.
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Beltway

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #67 on: December 19, 2019, 11:41:24 AM »

I don't think there was any serious consideration for removing 95 in Philly by those that matter.  It was, and still is, a goal of anti-highway folks that don't necessary look at ADT numbers, but rather look and say that it's the least congested stretch of highway in the area, which is true because it was built properly to handle the amount of traffic expected. 

Also importantly, in that it is paralleled by 3 Interstate standard Philadelphia bypasses --
I-476/I-276, I-295 and NJTP.
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Tonytone

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #68 on: December 19, 2019, 11:43:41 AM »

How long, though, before the New Urbanists Kool-Aid their way in with the "We could save even MORE money if we just converted current Wilmington I-95 to a surface boulevard and rerouted I-95 around the city via I-495!!!! CARS SUCK!!! OUT!!!!" nonsense?
Such was considered for the Philly stretch as well but was thankfully stopped by the fact that the daily traffic counts for that particular stretch were well over 120,000-130,000 vehicles.  Both I-676 & 76, especially the 4-lane sections, in that area get gridlocked on a daily basis already; both roads would be hopelessly gridlocked 24/7 if that piece of I-95 was not in the picture.

However, unlike Philly, Wilmington does have the wider 6-lane I-495 within close proximity; so one advocating a highway removal advocate could use that as an argument.  Such a plan would mean that I-495 would be redesignated again as I-95. 

The big questions for such would be:

1.  What are the current daily traffic counts for I-95 through downtown Wilmington?

2.  How much of those fore-mentioned counts local/o&d traffic?

3.  Wouldn't the stakeholders, mainly the Riverfront venues, have a say on the matter? 
I mentioned such earlier either here or on the general Delaware thread that those venues rely on that portion of I-95 as a transportation means for their patrons, service & delivery vehicles.  The DART busses & SEPTA/Amtrak rail services in the area are woefully inadequate for such.

I don't think there was any serious consideration for removing 95 in Philly by those that matter.  It was, and still is, a goal of anti-highway folks that don't necessary look at ADT numbers, but rather look and say that it's the least congested stretch of highway in the area, which is true because it was built properly to handle the amount of traffic expected.  Why these anti-highway people think that they can take 100,000+ vehicles and move them to 676, 76, and then a non-highway connection over the 35 mph Platt Bridge is a mind-boggling question.  This is also where they lose support.  They don't claim to want peds and bikes to share the road; they want peds and bikes to own the roads.  Reasonable proposals will give them room for negotiation.  Removing 95 completely is ridiculous.

As far as Wilmington goes, they probably simply don't have the united support of residents within the city to remove 95, or even to cap it.  Yes, it's been discussed off and on for years, but the cost of such a cap would probably be close to the annual budget for all of Delaware's roadways state-wide. 

The area of Wilmington that 95 directly affects is just a few blocks when it comes down to it, from around 4th Street to 9th Street.  On the face of it, it wouldn't be too hard to have 495 renumbered as 95 carry the thru traffic.  .  But I don't think Wilmington would be all that interested in losing one of the USA's highest profile highways thru their city.

Shutting down 95 in Philly is a very bad idea. I dont even think Bicyclists would think thats a good idea. I dont know who would even think thats a good idea



As far as the cap in Wilmington goes, I think its owed due to the fact that spilt a thriving area in half & caused the city to be what it is today, granted the city is improving but the damage it has caused will last another 20-40 years.


The pushing of highways thru urban areas is another reason that many cities have crime & pollution. Areas being determined as a West or east side because a highway splits the area caused many of the things we see today that people in the 50’s would call “undesirable”


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Beltway

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #69 on: December 19, 2019, 11:51:22 AM »

The pushing of highways thru urban areas is another reason that many cities have crime & pollution. Areas being determined as a West or east side because a highway splits the area caused many of the things we see today that people in the 50’s would call “undesirable”
Most cities were already divided in that way decades previously by various railroad lines.

By rivers and major creeks as well, and while they are natural and not manmade, the decision to build urbanized areas around them was certainly manmade.
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Tonytone

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #70 on: December 19, 2019, 12:02:02 PM »

The pushing of highways thru urban areas is another reason that many cities have crime & pollution. Areas being determined as a West or east side because a highway splits the area caused many of the things we see today that people in the 50’s would call “undesirable”
Most cities were already divided in that way decades previously by various railroad lines.

By rivers and major creeks as well, and while they are natural and not manmade, the decision to build urbanized areas around them was certainly manmade.
Ahh, but were the rail lines as dividing as a highway is? Every-time I see a rail line, wether it Trolley, Subway or Elevated; it brings people together unlike a highway which is dangerous & for cars only.

I dont want to bring this convo into politics. But Minority neighborhoods were thriving & then highways were built & areas were raved. You then saw the fall of these areas & they haven’t came back yet. I think a solution needs to be met with both sides.


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jeffandnicole

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #71 on: December 19, 2019, 12:07:29 PM »

I don't think there was any serious consideration for removing 95 in Philly by those that matter.  It was, and still is, a goal of anti-highway folks that don't necessary look at ADT numbers, but rather look and say that it's the least congested stretch of highway in the area, which is true because it was built properly to handle the amount of traffic expected. 

Also importantly, in that it is paralleled by 3 Interstate standard Philadelphia bypasses --
I-476/I-276, I-295 and NJTP.

It would be more important to know how much 95 traffic is beyond-region based.  It would probably be easy to argue that most of that traffic is relatively localized to the Delaware Valley area.  I'm sure very little traffic, especially going Southbound, left the Turnpike to get over to 95 in Pennsy to continue their drive south to Delaware and beyond in years-past. 

I would imagine a LOT of that 95 traffic flowing thru Philly is simply traffic going from a PA county to a PA county (ie, Bucks County to Delaware County).  A simple license plate could would probably verify how many non-PA and non-NJ tags travel thru this area.  And figure that the destination for many of those non-state tags is Philly or a nearby county.  Sesame Place, for example, is a frequently visited amusement park where travelers from Delaware or Maryland wouldn't generally benefit by crossing over into NJ, then back into PA.

Now that the 95 routing is complete, it would be a complete slap in the face for everyone to complain that 95 in NJ was never completed, then to turn around and cut off 95 in Philly.

Ahh, but were the rail lines as dividing as a highway is? Every-time I see a rail line, wether it Trolley, Subway or Elevated; it brings people together unlike a highway which is dangerous & for cars only.

Do you see Amtrak lines?  SEPTA Regional Rail lines?  These are the lines being referred to.  They probably aren't as divided as much as highways because people cut the fence and trespass through.  Then when someone is hit, they blame the rail line (and often, the wrong agency) for allowing that hole to exist, even though as they complain, someone is probably cutting a new hole in the fence.
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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #72 on: December 19, 2019, 12:23:10 PM »

I don't think there was any serious consideration for removing 95 in Philly by those that matter.  It was, and still is, a goal of anti-highway folks that don't necessary look at ADT numbers, but rather look and say that it's the least congested stretch of highway in the area, which is true because it was built properly to handle the amount of traffic expected. 

Also importantly, in that it is paralleled by 3 Interstate standard Philadelphia bypasses --
I-476/I-276, I-295 and NJTP.

It would be more important to know how much 95 traffic is beyond-region based.  It would probably be easy to argue that most of that traffic is relatively localized to the Delaware Valley area.  I'm sure very little traffic, especially going Southbound, left the Turnpike to get over to 95 in Pennsy to continue their drive south to Delaware and beyond in years-past. 

I would imagine a LOT of that 95 traffic flowing thru Philly is simply traffic going from a PA county to a PA county (ie, Bucks County to Delaware County).  A simple license plate could would probably verify how many non-PA and non-NJ tags travel thru this area.  And figure that the destination for many of those non-state tags is Philly or a nearby county.  Sesame Place, for example, is a frequently visited amusement park where travelers from Delaware or Maryland wouldn't generally benefit by crossing over into NJ, then back into PA.

Now that the 95 routing is complete, it would be a complete slap in the face for everyone to complain that 95 in NJ was never completed, then to turn around and cut off 95 in Philly.

Ahh, but were the rail lines as dividing as a highway is? Every-time I see a rail line, wether it Trolley, Subway or Elevated; it brings people together unlike a highway which is dangerous & for cars only.

Do you see Amtrak lines?  SEPTA Regional Rail lines?  These are the lines being referred to.  They probably aren't as divided as much as highways because people cut the fence and trespass through.  Then when someone is hit, they blame the rail line (and often, the wrong agency) for allowing that hole to exist, even though as they complain, someone is probably cutting a new hole in the fence.


Cmon jeff, are we gonna act like anyone that cuts a hole in a fence to cross the tracks that are usually not around regular walking routes are people that are up to no good or homeless people trying to get to the camp?

Anyone who plays by the train tracks are asking for something to happen. This isnt the 1800’s where we have trains running thru major areas of cities at ground level....


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Tonytone

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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #73 on: December 19, 2019, 12:25:26 PM »

Also if anyone hasnt saw the plans for I-95 reconstruction yet, here they go.

https://deldot.gov/projects/index.shtml?dc=details&projectNumber=T201407404

Very interesting stuff in here.
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Re: Downtown Wilmington Delaware I-95 Reconstruction Project.
« Reply #74 on: December 19, 2019, 02:42:22 PM »

The pushing of highways thru urban areas is another reason that many cities have crime & pollution. Areas being determined as a West or east side because a highway splits the area caused many of the things we see today that people in the 50’s would call “undesirable”.
Many crime-infested neighborhoods existed before any highways were built in said-areas.  Many areas that were once thriving economically that became crime-infested areas later on was the result of many factories, mills, textiles, etc. closing down with nothing viable as an economic replacement.  In terms of pollution, those fore-mentioned establishments weren't exactly pollution-free in their hey-day either.  I could also state some cultural, political & societal reasons for such as well; but I'm not going to derail this thread & turn it into a flame war/p*ssing contest for such.

Long story short: saying that highways are the primary reason for urban blight & pollution in many instances is flat-out bunk because such already existed beforehand.  Highways, both proposed & existing, are just common scapegoats.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2019, 02:45:20 PM by PHLBOS »
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