AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: I-84 over Deadman Pass  (Read 419 times)

bugo

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6011
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Oklahoma
  • Last Login: Today at 05:31:39 AM
    • No Frills Blog
I-84 over Deadman Pass
« on: March 14, 2019, 08:58:04 AM »

I was checking out some sights on Google Earth and noticed how curvy I-84 was through this section is. What is the speed limit? What is the recommended speed around the curves? Were all those curves necessary?
Logged
This signature has been censored by the AARoads Bureau of Morality.

doorknob60

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 685
  • Age: 25
  • Location: Boise, ID
  • Last Login: March 25, 2019, 06:54:38 PM
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2019, 12:35:18 PM »

The speed limit is actually 70 through all of it (trucks 65), just as it is the entire way from The Dalles Dam to the Idaho border (though, there is a variable speed section near Baker City, but that defaults to 70). With only a few exceptions, Oregon does not lower the speed limit on rural highways for curves, hills, or anything like that. Generally the only reason a highway speed limit is lowered is when it enters a city. Though, the eastern Oregon higher legislative speed limits complicate that a bit (example, US-97 having some 65 stretches and some 55 stretches). Advisory speeds I believe are as low as 45. Trucks often are going even slower (especially uphill of course). Yes, those curves were probably necessary, even as it is it's quite steep. Side note, I'll be driving through here later today  :cool:
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 12:41:39 PM by doorknob60 »
Logged

Mark68

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 250
  • Location: Parker, CO
  • Last Login: Today at 01:29:05 AM
    • My Travels over the years
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2019, 05:23:55 PM »

Is that the pass east of Pendleton to get into the Blue Mountains?

Yes. Those curves are VERY necessary. That hill is no joke.
Logged
"When you come to a fork in the road, take it."~Yogi Berra

Bickendan

  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2430
  • Last Login: March 25, 2019, 02:19:33 PM
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2019, 10:19:48 PM »

I last drove that in 2006, and I remember feeling centrifugal gs going through the curves at 50.
Logged

Bruce

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1970
  • Transit Commuter

  • Age: 21
  • Location: Snohomish County, WA
  • Last Login: Today at 03:13:58 AM
    • Wikipedia
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2019, 11:50:30 PM »

The Deadman Pass section is about 8 miles that climbs 3,000 feet while hitting the Interstate maximum of 6 percent. It's definitely the most treacherous freeway in the Pacific Northwest, and racks up a lot of collisions.

The Bend Bulletin made this neat infographic of the area's worst stretches of I-84 for a 2013 article on the highway's high collision rate.

Duke87

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 5135
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Queens, NY
  • Last Login: March 24, 2019, 11:49:02 PM
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2019, 12:42:57 AM »

Advisory speeds I believe are as low as 45.

Lower, even, depending on how much you weigh:
Logged
If you always take the same road, you will never see anything new.

J N Winkler

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6170
  • Location: Wichita, Kansas/Oxford, Great Britain
  • Last Login: Today at 01:08:21 AM
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2019, 03:29:27 PM »

Oregon DOT is the only agency I am aware of that signs speed tables keyed to laden weight.  Siskiyou Pass (I-5 just north of the California state line) has speed table signs as well.  I find Cabbage Hill (the name I use; I've also seen Emigrant Pass) to be a real teddy bear, but I have only ever driven it in a passenger car and I know how to use an automatic transmission to develop engine braking.

A few years ago John McPhee, the pioneer of creative nonfiction, wrote a piece about the trucking industry for which much of the research consisted of ride-alongs with an owner-operator specializing in one-off bulk tanker loads.  This involved a descent of Cabbage Hill with a full load and McPhee later described the owner-operator as being very critical of other truckers who speed down the hill instead of taking their time and executing the drop in altitude in a smooth, resource-conserving manner.

John McPhee, "A fleet of one," New Yorker, 2003-02-17
Logged
"It is necessary to spend a hundred lire now to save a thousand lire later."--Piero Puricelli, explaining the need for a first-class road system to Benito Mussolini

nexus73

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1582
  • Age: 63
  • Location: Coos Bay OR
  • Last Login: Today at 12:22:29 AM
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2019, 07:45:44 PM »

Oregon DOT is the only agency I am aware of that signs speed tables keyed to laden weight.  Siskiyou Pass (I-5 just north of the California state line) has speed table signs as well.  I find Cabbage Hill (the name I use; I've also seen Emigrant Pass) to be a real teddy bear, but I have only ever driven it in a passenger car and I know how to use an automatic transmission to develop engine braking.

A few years ago John McPhee, the pioneer of creative nonfiction, wrote a piece about the trucking industry for which much of the research consisted of ride-alongs with an owner-operator specializing in one-off bulk tanker loads.  This involved a descent of Cabbage Hill with a full load and McPhee later described the owner-operator as being very critical of other truckers who speed down the hill instead of taking their time and executing the drop in altitude in a smooth, resource-conserving manner.

John McPhee, "A fleet of one," New Yorker, 2003-02-17

Sorry I cannot remember the title but there was a sci-fi book I read that had trucks going 200 MPH along superfreeways.  Can you imagine the horsepower, torque and aerodynamics it would take to get an 18-wheeler going that fast? 

Truck driving is akin to piloting aircraft.  "There are old pilots and there are bold pilots, but there are no old bold pilots".  The driver who knew the safe way to take Cabbage Hill was likely an experienced pro.  Those who move the load in zoom-zoom mode are likely recent graduates of truck driving school.  My father could drive a truck on a highway and rarely use his brakes since he knew each curve and grade on his routes, which let him select the proper speed and gear.  He always led the operator's fleet in MPG.  Preserving that air (trucks use air brakes) is an essential. 

What happens when the brakes go out: A driver on I-80 heading west through Emigrant Pass in Utah wound up with no stopping power.  He knew that when I-80 intersected I-15, it was Game Over.  That led him to doing everything he could do to preserve the lives of those around him before he found a safe (for everyone else) place to crash the truck.  He died and it was a noble sacrifice but if he had managed his situation better, maybe he is still around.  I will always feel sad and proud of that trucker for what he did.

Rick
Logged
US 101 is THE backbone of the Pacific coast from Bandon OR to Willets CA.  Industry, tourism and local traffic would be gone or severely crippled without it being in functioning condition in BOTH states.

pdx-wanderer

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 106
  • Age: 22
  • Location: Portland, Oregon
  • Last Login: Today at 04:27:34 AM
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2019, 12:43:12 PM »

Oregon is not completely adverse to lowering rural speed limits due to terrain considerations; I-5 has several such places - Terwilliger Curves, Myrtle Creek curve have speed reductions to 50 mph, and the Siskiyou Pass portion has a reduction to 55 mph. The Interstate Bridge is also posted at 50 mph, lowered from 55 if that counts. However, all of those are much less treacherous conditions, and even before the new legislative speed limits I don't think I-84 had any terrain related speed reductions anyway.

Deadman Pass (and everything else from there to Idaho) having the highest posted truck speed limit not only in Oregon but the entire West Coast will never not be funny. Meanwhile, I-5 in the Willamette Valley remains at 65/60...
Logged

US 89

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1812
  • 189 to Evanston!

  • Location: Salt Lake City, UT/Atlanta, GA
  • Last Login: Today at 01:03:36 AM
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2019, 01:14:27 PM »

What happens when the brakes go out: A driver on I-80 heading west through Emigrant Pass in Utah wound up with no stopping power.  He knew that when I-80 intersected I-15, it was Game Over.  That led him to doing everything he could do to preserve the lives of those around him before he found a safe (for everyone else) place to crash the truck.  He died and it was a noble sacrifice but if he had managed his situation better, maybe he is still around.  I will always feel sad and proud of that trucker for what he did.

Wow. I assume you’re referring to Parleys Summit (Emigrant Pass is on I-70). Today there’s a runaway truck ramp about halfway down Parleys Canyon, but it may not have been there at that time.



As for Deadman Pass: I remember driving it several years back during a family trip, and we were all amazed at the rate of elevation gain (or loss, depending on which way you’re going). It’s a good thing my mom was driving at the time, because she almost certainly would have gotten carsick otherwise!
Logged
Interstate clinches: 14, 82, 215 (UT), 225, 345, 444, 575
US clinches: 491, 550

Flickr
Imgur

Bruce

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1970
  • Transit Commuter

  • Age: 21
  • Location: Snohomish County, WA
  • Last Login: Today at 03:13:58 AM
    • Wikipedia
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2019, 02:15:53 PM »

It's definitely more dramatic than some of the more popular Cascades passes, which have a slower rise and follow river valleys as much as they can.

nexus73

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1582
  • Age: 63
  • Location: Coos Bay OR
  • Last Login: Today at 12:22:29 AM
Re: I-84 over Deadman Pass
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2019, 07:15:14 PM »

What happens when the brakes go out: A driver on I-80 heading west through Emigrant Pass in Utah wound up with no stopping power.  He knew that when I-80 intersected I-15, it was Game Over.  That led him to doing everything he could do to preserve the lives of those around him before he found a safe (for everyone else) place to crash the truck.  He died and it was a noble sacrifice but if he had managed his situation better, maybe he is still around.  I will always feel sad and proud of that trucker for what he did.

Wow. I assume you’re referring to Parleys Summit (Emigrant Pass is on I-70). Today there’s a runaway truck ramp about halfway down Parleys Canyon, but it may not have been there at that time.



As for Deadman Pass: I remember driving it several years back during a family trip, and we were all amazed at the rate of elevation gain (or loss, depending on which way you’re going). It’s a good thing my mom was driving at the time, because she almost certainly would have gotten carsick otherwise!

Thank you for the correction US 89 :-)

Rick
Logged
US 101 is THE backbone of the Pacific coast from Bandon OR to Willets CA.  Industry, tourism and local traffic would be gone or severely crippled without it being in functioning condition in BOTH states.

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.