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Author Topic: Places isolated from their state that associate more with another state  (Read 2787 times)

SP Cook

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Honestly, the whole vibe I get from the river cities and counties in West Virginia is much more "northern panhandle" than anywhere else. Maybe it's just me, but it seems to me like Huntington has more in common with Parkersburg, Wheeling, Weirton, etc., than it does with Williamson or Logan, which are much closer.

I get what you are saying, but the flat-er parts of WV (there ain't no flat part) which is along the Ohio, Monongalia, and Kanawha and much more industrial (steel, aluminium, and chemicals) than coal oriented do have something of a more rust belt-ish vibe, but I can see the distinction between the actual north and central Appalachia.  To me the transition is somewhere on WV 2 between Parkersburg and New Martinsville.   

In the south, or what I call the main part of WV, while the towns are industrial, or perhaps post-industrial, the family background of most people is central Appalachian, be it one generation or four.  They, or their great grandfather, moved from some place like Logan to some place like Huntington for a better life.  In the northern edge, the ethnic background of the people in the city, and of the people in the nearby countryside who might move to those cities, is far different.

I can say the same thing about places like Lexington, Ashland, Ironton, Bristol-Kingsport-Johnson City, Roanoke-Lynchburg, or even the Carolina Piedmont and further south along the Appalachian crest, even Cincinnati all of which I feel (as a person who did just that, moved from rural central Appalachia to the nearest city for a better life) far more at home in that I do in northern WV.
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hbelkins

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Honestly, the whole vibe I get from the river cities and counties in West Virginia is much more "northern panhandle" than anywhere else. Maybe it's just me, but it seems to me like Huntington has more in common with Parkersburg, Wheeling, Weirton, etc., than it does with Williamson or Logan, which are much closer.

I get what you are saying, but the flat-er parts of WV (there ain't no flat part) which is along the Ohio, Monongalia, and Kanawha and much more industrial (steel, aluminium, and chemicals) than coal oriented do have something of a more rust belt-ish vibe, but I can see the distinction between the actual north and central Appalachia.  To me the transition is somewhere on WV 2 between Parkersburg and New Martinsville.   

In the south, or what I call the main part of WV, while the towns are industrial, or perhaps post-industrial, the family background of most people is central Appalachian, be it one generation or four.  They, or their great grandfather, moved from some place like Logan to some place like Huntington for a better life.  In the northern edge, the ethnic background of the people in the city, and of the people in the nearby countryside who might move to those cities, is far different.

I can say the same thing about places like Lexington, Ashland, Ironton, Bristol-Kingsport-Johnson City, Roanoke-Lynchburg, or even the Carolina Piedmont and further south along the Appalachian crest, even Cincinnati all of which I feel (as a person who did just that, moved from rural central Appalachia to the nearest city for a better life) far more at home in that I do in northern WV.

Cincinnati and Dayton, along with the areas around those two cities, are full of families that are two or three generations removed from eastern Kentucky.

I'm getting ready to (finally) read "Hillbilly Elegy," written by an Ohio native whose family's roots were in Breathitt County. The book's been both praised and panned; I guess I'll finally see what all the hoopla was about.
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Sctvhound

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The lower 3 counties in South Carolina (Jasper, Beaufort, Hampton) all lean toward the Savannah area. All 3 are in Savannahís TV market. Savannahís TV market is larger than Charleston because of that, while the SC counties strangely arenít in Savannahís radio market (even though most of Savannahís stations cover Hilton Head and it is only a 30 mile drive).

West Virginia is a varied state as SamC would know. Princeton to Wheeling is a 271 mile drive, and a good chunk of it goes through Ohio. Weirton is almost a 5 hour drive. Itís a closer drive to Charlotte and even Columbia, SC from Princeton than it is to Weirton.
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roadman65

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NJ has no identity as North Jersey tends to lean more to New York City (part of NY State of course) and South Jersey toward Philly.

However when radio comes in, like Toms River has its own market and one station (I forgot the call letters) but prides itself in saying Ocean County's best music catering to Ocean County's businesses to sponsor.  In Morris County( WDHA) was made it known it was Morris County's own station and had sponsorship with Morris County businesses. 

I do often wonder about Phillipsburg as its in Lehigh Valley's market both in radio and TV, so I wonder if that part of the state is neither NY or Philly but PA at that area adjacent.
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Sheryl Crowe

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Re: Places isolated from their state that associate more with another state
« Reply #79 on: August 03, 2019, 09:27:08 PM »

The Upper Peninsula of Michigan tends to run more with the Wisconsin types than the Lower Peninsula. 

The central and western U.P. is definitely that way - from about Munising/Manistique west is closer to Milwaukee and Madison than Lansing and Detroit. For example, you get more Packers fans than Lions fans. Houghton and Marquette have a large number of college students from the Lower Peninsula, which helps keeps a Michigan connection. But folks drive to Green Bay, Wausau, Duluth, or Minneapolis to shop rather than a Lower Peninsula location.

The eastern U.P. is physically closer to Lower Peninsula markets, and the residents tend to identify more with the Lower Peininsula. Radio and television markets are tied to the Traverse City area, for example (if not the Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario market).

From Munising to Newberry and south is mostly forest with few residents, which results in a Central/Western U.P. cluster and a (much smaller) Eastern U.P. cluster. Then there's Wakefield/Bessemer/Ironwood, which are in Duluth TV markets and within a 4 hour drive of the Twin Cities. To them, Detroit might as well be in another country.
The UP appears to have a very sharp divide at about M-77. Areas west of there tend to associate more with Marquette and Green Bay, while areas east of there tend to associate more with Sault Ste. Marie and Traverse City. Outside of the Lions, most of the UP either tends to lean toward Detroit for major sports or doesn't care about major sports at all.

Several Green Bay radio stations get listenership along Lake Michigan between about Glen Arbor and Silver Lake. In fact, years ago (I'm talking 1950s and 1960s), Manistee and Mason counties were even in the Green Bay TV market! As late as the early 1990s, the Ludington Daily News had more stations from Wisconsin in their TV listings than Michigan stations! Also, Ludington and Manistee were among the few areas of Michigan that never had WKBD on cable (they had WGN and WTBS, as well as WVTV very briefly). To this day, there are still a sizable number of Packers fans in west central lower Michigan as it usually has been easier to get the Packers on radio (it helps that their longtime Milwaukee affiliate sends all their juice north and northeast) than the Lions.
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golden eagle

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Re: Places isolated from their state that associate more with another state
« Reply #80 on: August 18, 2019, 02:00:20 AM »

I could argue that the Florida Panhandle seems more being a part of Alabama than does the rest of the state.
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KEVIN_224

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Re: Places isolated from their state that associate more with another state
« Reply #81 on: August 22, 2019, 07:13:00 PM »

Plus much of it is in the Central Time Zone, just like Alabama is.
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The Nature Boy

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Re: Places isolated from their state that associate more with another state
« Reply #82 on: September 20, 2019, 10:26:00 PM »

I have only been to the Plattsburgh area once, but in general the North Country and Vermont have a lot more in common with each other, than they do with Western and Central NY.
I still don't believe those in the Daks think that they're more of a part of Vermont than New York.
No, but that doesn't mean they have more in common with other parts of New York than they do with Vermont.
They certainly don't associate themselves with Vermont, which is where this discussion started.

To an "outsider" (of sorts) the area has a lot in common with Vermont. Maybe steviep24 should have phrased it differently, so it was clear that he is the one associating Plattsburgh with Vermont, not Plattsburgh residents themselves.

I live in the North Country. We certainly don't associate ourselves with Vermont... or anywhere else, for that matter. If anything, we associate more with Canada, but that's a stretch too.

Drive around in the North Country, then drive around in Vermont. Nothing alike. Vermont actually prides itself on beautification and natural beauty, for one, while the North Country is poor, with run-down buildings and overgrown weeds everywhere. It's long been said that this area is recession-proof because it's always in a recession. The two regions aren't even politically alike, either.

I've always thought that it was interesting that you could tell exactly when you cross the state line from Vermont to NY, even without seeing a welcome sign. The same natural scenery but such different economic circumstances.

Plattsburgh and Burlington do share a media market but I imagine the the North Country gets relatively little coverage on their shared stations.
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hbelkins

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Re: Places isolated from their state that associate more with another state
« Reply #83 on: September 21, 2019, 01:12:10 PM »

On a trip out to the Jackson Purchase area a couple of years ago, I was surprised at just how much of the area is so much closer to Union City, Tenn., than any decent-sized town in Kentucky (Murray and Paducah, and to a lesser extent, Mayfield). The state line is probably a hard dividing line between Big Blue and Rocky Top fandom, but I wonder what other sports allegiances there are in that area. Pretty sure the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs are the dominant baseball teams.
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The Nature Boy

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Re: Places isolated from their state that associate more with another state
« Reply #84 on: September 21, 2019, 03:09:18 PM »

On a trip out to the Jackson Purchase area a couple of years ago, I was surprised at just how much of the area is so much closer to Union City, Tenn., than any decent-sized town in Kentucky (Murray and Paducah, and to a lesser extent, Mayfield). The state line is probably a hard dividing line between Big Blue and Rocky Top fandom, but I wonder what other sports allegiances there are in that area. Pretty sure the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs are the dominant baseball teams.

How far would Tennessee Titans NFL fandom extend into that area? It's not that far from Nashville and with the Rams gone now, you'd think that the Titans could grab that entire region.
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hbelkins

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Re: Places isolated from their state that associate more with another state
« Reply #85 on: September 21, 2019, 09:44:23 PM »

On a trip out to the Jackson Purchase area a couple of years ago, I was surprised at just how much of the area is so much closer to Union City, Tenn., than any decent-sized town in Kentucky (Murray and Paducah, and to a lesser extent, Mayfield). The state line is probably a hard dividing line between Big Blue and Rocky Top fandom, but I wonder what other sports allegiances there are in that area. Pretty sure the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs are the dominant baseball teams.

How far would Tennessee Titans NFL fandom extend into that area? It's not that far from Nashville and with the Rams gone now, you'd think that the Titans could grab that entire region.

I'd guess that's the dominant football team unless that place was already Cowboys country. I haven't followed the NFL in years so really, I don't pay it much mind, and if I did, well the Titans are the recycled Houston Oilers, and I couldn't stand them when they were in the Bengals' division back when I did watch the NFL.

The only good thing about the Browns moving to Baltimore and Browns 2.0 being established is that it would give me two sets of Cleveland Browns to hate.  :bigass:
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