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Author Topic: Virginia  (Read 745131 times)

Beltway

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4350 on: August 17, 2019, 03:28:19 PM »

All lanes on I-64 east of I-295 are definitely open now, and all of the cones are gone.
I just rode thru there an hour ago.  Three lanes each way are open between I-295 and VA-249 Bottoms Bridge, and all surface paving is complete.  The outer lane starts and ends at each interchange, and that will ultimately tie into a thru lane when the adjacent widening projects are built in the future.  Very nice result!
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sprjus4

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4351 on: August 17, 2019, 03:44:08 PM »

All lanes on I-64 east of I-295 are definitely open now, and all of the cones are gone.
I just rode thru there an hour ago.  Three lanes each way are open between I-295 and VA-249 Bottoms Bridge, and all surface paving is complete.  The outer lane starts and ends at each interchange, and that will ultimately tie into a thru lane when the adjacent widening projects are built in the future.  Very nice result!
Did any of the usual Saturday traffic jams exist still or did this project do the trick?

As for the remainder, hopefully we can start seeing more phases under construction by 2021 - 2022. It'd be nice to see 6-lanes between VA-249 and VA-199 completed by 2030.
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4352 on: August 17, 2019, 04:13:05 PM »

All lanes on I-64 east of I-295 are definitely open now, and all of the cones are gone.
I just rode thru there an hour ago.  Three lanes each way are open between I-295 and VA-249 Bottoms Bridge, and all surface paving is complete.  The outer lane starts and ends at each interchange, and that will ultimately tie into a thru lane when the adjacent widening projects are built in the future.  Very nice result!
Did any of the usual Saturday traffic jams exist still or did this project do the trick?

As for the remainder, hopefully we can start seeing more phases under construction by 2021 - 2022. It'd be nice to see 6-lanes between VA-249 and VA-199 completed by 2030.

No congestion on the 6-lane portion but earlier there was congestion east of there up to about Exit 220 on the EB side. I checked traffic just now and that congestion is now gone. We'll see how it looks tomorrow afternoon.

Also while I was checking, both Hampton Roads tunnels were screwed as well as the entire length of I-95 north of Richmond. Typical summer weekend.
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Beltway

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4353 on: August 17, 2019, 08:11:30 PM »

I just rode thru there an hour ago.  Three lanes each way are open between I-295 and VA-249 Bottoms Bridge, and all surface paving is complete.  The outer lane starts and ends at each interchange, and that will ultimately tie into a thru lane when the adjacent widening projects are built in the future.  Very nice result!
Did any of the usual Saturday traffic jams exist still or did this project do the trick?
Traffic was busy but free-flowing.  I didn't go east of VA-249 as that is where I get off to visit friends, so I can't speak about that section.
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4354 on: August 17, 2019, 08:21:25 PM »

I checked VA I-85 status on the rehabs of the concrete sections MP 40 to 69.  Ongoing projects to rebab the concrete pavement and overlay with asphalt pavement.

SBL US-460 to MP 42 was completed several years ago in one project.  The section between MP 40 and 42 was completed in the last year and now all the old concrete pavement has been overlaid with asphalt.

NBL between MP 40 and US-460 has seen various projects over the last 5 years and now there is only 5.2 miles that has not been rehabbed/resurfaced with asphalt.

The above sections were originally built with continuously reinforced concrete pavement.

NBL and SBL between US-460 and east of US-1 has a project that been completed except for a section where the final course of asphalt remains to be placed.  This section was opened in the mid-1960s and had the jointed concrete pavement and it had gotten rather bumpy before this project.

Vast improvements.  The newest part of VA I-85 is now 49 years old.

South of MP 40 the original pavement is asphalt all the way to MP 0.
 
« Last Edit: August 17, 2019, 08:24:59 PM by Beltway »
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sprjus4

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4355 on: August 20, 2019, 06:12:05 PM »

I-64 Widening Project Complete in Henrico, New Kent Counties
Quote


SOUTH CHESTERFIELD – On Tuesday, August 20, the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) completed the $46.4 million Interstate 64 widening project between Interstate 295 (mile marker 200) in Henrico and Bottoms Bridge (mile marker 205) in New Kent. Corman-Branch, a joint venture, of Roanoke, Va. completed the major widening project in approximately two years, ahead of schedule and under budget.

Construction began in August 2017 to widen I-64 from two to three travel lanes in both the eastbound and westbound directions. Newly completed improvements include an added 12-foot wide travel lane and a 10-foot wide shoulder in both directions in the median of the preexisting roadway, widened bridges over the Chickahominy River and improved acceleration and deceleration lanes at the truck weigh station (mile marker 203). Sound mitigation walls have also been constructed within project limits and the 55 mph work zone speed limit has been lifted.

“The completed project is intended to provide congestion relief and added safety to the I-64 corridor,” said Scott Fisher, VDOT Richmond District Mega Projects Engineer. “An additional travel lane in each direction will accommodate current and future traffic volumes on I-64 and is expected to lessen travel times to and from Virginia Beach.”

More information on VDOT’s I-64 mobility improvements on and to the peninsula is available at http://i64widening.org/.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2019, 06:31:04 PM by sprjus4 »
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Beltway

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4356 on: August 20, 2019, 10:44:46 PM »

Construction began in August 2017 to widen I-64 from two to three travel lanes in both the eastbound and westbound directions. Newly completed improvements include an added 12-foot wide travel lane and a 10-foot wide shoulder in both directions in the median of the preexisting roadway,
The photo shows otherwise, as we have talked about before!  :-)

widened bridges over the Chickahominy River
Complete replacement of existing structures, appropriate for bridges that are over 50 years old.  The new bridges appear to have full 10-foot left shoulders.

and improved acceleration and deceleration lanes at the truck weigh station (mile marker 203). Sound mitigation walls have also been constructed within project limits and the 55 mph work zone speed limit has been lifted.
I was last there 3 days ago and the speed zone had not yet been lifted.  The sound walls are a big improvement for the dozens of homes nearby (probably none there when I-64 was originally built).
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4357 on: August 23, 2019, 10:19:08 PM »

Right down the road from Colonial Baptist Church and Virginia Beach Theological Seminary.
. . . . . .

https://www.pilotonline.com/news/chesapeake/vp-nw-centerville-turnpike-bridge-20190822-xdqq6sb66rhzniscp3vjzrwsri-story.html

Chesapeake’s Centerville Turnpike Bridge closing for 6 months: “It’s going to be a significant traffic impact.”
By Alyssa Meyers
The Virginian-Pilot 
Aug 22, 2019
 
The Centerville Turnpike Bridge has been doing its job carrying traffic over the Intracoastal Waterway for 64 years.

Now, the Chesapeake span is taking a day off. Or a couple hundred.

The two-lane bridge will close for six months starting Saturday while it’s removed and repaired, a project that city employees and local business owners agree is a necessary inconvenience.

The surface of the bridge and the mechanism that allows it to pivot horizontally so vessels can pass have to be replaced, said Earl Sorey, assistant public works director.

“The only way to do that is to take the bridge out of service,” Sorey said. “It’s going to be a significant traffic impact, there’s no doubt about that.”

The repairs will ensure the bridge, which carries nearly 16,000 vehicles a day, can open and close reliably with the hope of preventing unplanned closures in the future.

The span opened about 4,700 times in 2018, which is a normal yearly average, said Jason Brown, a public works department spokesman. In the past year, traffic was impacted five times for more than two hours because of a malfunction, he said.

While the bridge is out of service for six months, detours will take drivers about 5 to 8 miles to the Va. 168 Bypass over the waterway. Sorey said the city has asked the Coast Guard for permission to suspend one Great Bridge Bridge opening in the morning and another one in the afternoon during peak traffic hours.

All other non-emergency projects that could impact traffic will be temporarily suspended, and the timing of signals on adjacent roads will be adjusted to help alleviate traffic.

Part of the project’s funding comes from the Virginia Department of Transportation’s State of Good Repair program, Sorey said, which means the city is obligated to complete the project within a certain time frame.

The original start date for the closure was July 28, which would have meant greater impact on summer spending for local businesses. But the city decided to delay until Aug. 24 to make sure the contractor had all the necessary materials in place before closing the bridge.

“There’s really no good time of year to close a bridge like that, especially when you’re looking at up to a six-month closure,” Sorey said. “For us the bigger issue was having a funded project with a contractor in place and a plan in place.”
 
The new August start date gives drivers less time to adjust to the detours before Chesapeake Public Schools reopen on Sept. 3, although the division does not expect the bridge closure will directly impact day-to-day operations.

“On a daily basis, virtually none of our buses use that bridge for transporting students,” said Chesapeake Public Schools spokesman Richie Babb. “Students who live on opposite sides of the bridge stay on their side to attend school.”

After the revitalization, the bridge is expected to last at least another 15 years, but by then it will need to be replaced altogether.

“The work that’s going on right now is just rehab,” Sorey said.

In addition to working closely with the Coast Guard and the contractor to mitigate traffic impacts, the city has also undertaken efforts to notify the public of the project, Brown said.

There’s a tweet about the project pinned to the top of the Chesapeake Roads Twitter account, and the announcement has been posted on other social media platforms as well, Brown said.

Letters have been sent to businesses, schools, churches and residents. The community also has had the opportunity to ask questions at a public meeting in Great Bridge, and electronic signs announcing the bridge closure have been activated in the area.

“We’ve used every tool to ensure this information was disseminated well in advance and everyone had a chance to hear this,” Brown said.

Centerville Turnpike will remain open to local traffic so drivers can come and go from neighborhoods closest to the bridge. But some businesses in the area still expressed concern that the closure would make their services less accessible.

The Centerville Animal Hospital, which handles veterinary emergencies, is located immediately south of the bridge. Veterinary technician Michelle Galyo said in addition to making her office harder to reach, the bridge closure also complicates traveling to other hospitals.

Galyo said she often refers clients to 24-hour emergency services or specialists on the other side of the bridge, and the closest emergency hospital is north by Greenbrier Mall.

“We’ve had clients who purposefully try to schedule appointments around any closures that have occurred thus far,” she said. “We definitely have had both clients and employees who are concerned, fully recognizing that for as often as the bridge gets stuck open and how long it’s been in use, it definitely needs some work done.”

Ashley Bryant, the manager at Angie’s Family Restaurant, also just south of the bridge, said she’s worried the detour might lead to a decline in weekday lunch business.

“People are on a time limit,” she said. “We’re just hoping that our customers will drive the extra way around.”

Bryant said while she wishes the closure wouldn’t coincide so closely with the reopening of the public schools after summer break, she knows the project is unavoidable.

“It’s crazy enough on this roadway with buses and traffic in general,” she said. “It’s going to be complete mayhem.”
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sprjus4

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4358 on: August 23, 2019, 10:29:45 PM »

Right down the road from Colonial Baptist Church and Virginia Beach Theological Seminary.
. . . . . .

https://www.pilotonline.com/news/chesapeake/vp-nw-centerville-turnpike-bridge-20190822-xdqq6sb66rhzniscp3vjzrwsri-story.html

Chesapeake’s Centerville Turnpike Bridge closing for 6 months: “It’s going to be a significant traffic impact.”
By Alyssa Meyers
The Virginian-Pilot 
Aug 22, 2019
 
The Centerville Turnpike Bridge has been doing its job carrying traffic over the Intracoastal Waterway for 64 years.

Now, the Chesapeake span is taking a day off. Or a couple hundred.

The two-lane bridge will close for six months starting Saturday while it’s removed and repaired, a project that city employees and local business owners agree is a necessary inconvenience.

The surface of the bridge and the mechanism that allows it to pivot horizontally so vessels can pass have to be replaced, said Earl Sorey, assistant public works director.

“The only way to do that is to take the bridge out of service,” Sorey said. “It’s going to be a significant traffic impact, there’s no doubt about that.”

The repairs will ensure the bridge, which carries nearly 16,000 vehicles a day, can open and close reliably with the hope of preventing unplanned closures in the future.

The span opened about 4,700 times in 2018, which is a normal yearly average, said Jason Brown, a public works department spokesman. In the past year, traffic was impacted five times for more than two hours because of a malfunction, he said.

While the bridge is out of service for six months, detours will take drivers about 5 to 8 miles to the Va. 168 Bypass over the waterway. Sorey said the city has asked the Coast Guard for permission to suspend one Great Bridge Bridge opening in the morning and another one in the afternoon during peak traffic hours.

All other non-emergency projects that could impact traffic will be temporarily suspended, and the timing of signals on adjacent roads will be adjusted to help alleviate traffic.

Part of the project’s funding comes from the Virginia Department of Transportation’s State of Good Repair program, Sorey said, which means the city is obligated to complete the project within a certain time frame.

The original start date for the closure was July 28, which would have meant greater impact on summer spending for local businesses. But the city decided to delay until Aug. 24 to make sure the contractor had all the necessary materials in place before closing the bridge.

“There’s really no good time of year to close a bridge like that, especially when you’re looking at up to a six-month closure,” Sorey said. “For us the bigger issue was having a funded project with a contractor in place and a plan in place.”
 
The new August start date gives drivers less time to adjust to the detours before Chesapeake Public Schools reopen on Sept. 3, although the division does not expect the bridge closure will directly impact day-to-day operations.

“On a daily basis, virtually none of our buses use that bridge for transporting students,” said Chesapeake Public Schools spokesman Richie Babb. “Students who live on opposite sides of the bridge stay on their side to attend school.”

After the revitalization, the bridge is expected to last at least another 15 years, but by then it will need to be replaced altogether.

“The work that’s going on right now is just rehab,” Sorey said.

In addition to working closely with the Coast Guard and the contractor to mitigate traffic impacts, the city has also undertaken efforts to notify the public of the project, Brown said.

There’s a tweet about the project pinned to the top of the Chesapeake Roads Twitter account, and the announcement has been posted on other social media platforms as well, Brown said.

Letters have been sent to businesses, schools, churches and residents. The community also has had the opportunity to ask questions at a public meeting in Great Bridge, and electronic signs announcing the bridge closure have been activated in the area.

“We’ve used every tool to ensure this information was disseminated well in advance and everyone had a chance to hear this,” Brown said.

Centerville Turnpike will remain open to local traffic so drivers can come and go from neighborhoods closest to the bridge. But some businesses in the area still expressed concern that the closure would make their services less accessible.

The Centerville Animal Hospital, which handles veterinary emergencies, is located immediately south of the bridge. Veterinary technician Michelle Galyo said in addition to making her office harder to reach, the bridge closure also complicates traveling to other hospitals.

Galyo said she often refers clients to 24-hour emergency services or specialists on the other side of the bridge, and the closest emergency hospital is north by Greenbrier Mall.

“We’ve had clients who purposefully try to schedule appointments around any closures that have occurred thus far,” she said. “We definitely have had both clients and employees who are concerned, fully recognizing that for as often as the bridge gets stuck open and how long it’s been in use, it definitely needs some work done.”

Ashley Bryant, the manager at Angie’s Family Restaurant, also just south of the bridge, said she’s worried the detour might lead to a decline in weekday lunch business.

“People are on a time limit,” she said. “We’re just hoping that our customers will drive the extra way around.”

Bryant said while she wishes the closure wouldn’t coincide so closely with the reopening of the public schools after summer break, she knows the project is unavoidable.

“It’s crazy enough on this roadway with buses and traffic in general,” she said. “It’s going to be complete mayhem.”
Live nearby... use it very frequently. The traffic around here is bad enough, especially on the Expressway, this is just going to multiply that problem. 16,000 AADT is going to be detoured onto a 4-lane highway with 75,000 AADT that already has congestion issues, and a 2-lane road with 25,000 AADT that also already has issues. Some traffic obviously won’t use it, but a majority will. They’ve closed the bridge for a week a few times, and it was horrible on Mt Pleasant Rd, the Expressway, Battlefield Blvd, and Kempsville Rd, all parking lots for miles.

I understand why it needs to be done, but it is no doubt going to be a painful 6 months.
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Beltway

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4359 on: August 23, 2019, 10:34:02 PM »

Right down the road from Colonial Baptist Church and Virginia Beach Theological Seminary.
Live nearby... use it very frequently. The traffic around here is bad enough, especially on the Expressway, this is just going to multiply that problem. 16,000 AADT is going to be detoured onto a 4-lane highway with 75,000 AADT that already has congestion issues. Some traffic obviously won’t use it, but a majority will. They’ve closed the bridge for a week a few times, and it was horrible on Mt Pleasant Rd, the Expressway, Battlefield Blvd, and Kempsville Rd, all parking lots for miles.
I understand why it needs to be done, but it is no doubt going to be a painful 6 months.
I get to CBC and VBTS without needing to use that bridge.  I just noticed the sign today at the bridge that says it will close for 6 months on Aug. 24th.

Wonder what they would replace it with, a high-level bridge, or a modern movable span bridge like the Bus. VA-168 bridge over the ICW?  I'm sure it would be expensive.
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4360 on: August 23, 2019, 11:20:13 PM »

Wonder what they would replace it with, a high-level bridge, or a modern movable span bridge like the Bus. VA-168 bridge over the ICW?  I'm sure it would be expensive.
Right now, they are only replacing parts on the bridge, such as the pivot which moves the bridge, along with other different components. They have to take the bridge out of service and move it to a different location in order to complete the necessary work. In 6 months, it will be put back and re-opened to traffic. The closure is only one part of the project though... the overall rehabilitation project began back in May and is to continue throughout 2020.

In the future, roughly 15-20 years, the city eventually plans to replace the bridge entirely. The new bridge would be a 4 to 6 lane fixed-span bridge with a 65 foot navigational clearance and while no detailed cost estimate exists, the city estimates roughly ~$100 million. There's currently a feasibility study underway that is set to be completed in Summer 2020 that would look at different alignments, impacts, and detailed cost estimates.

http://www.cityofchesapeake.net/government/city-departments/departments/Public-Works-Department/Active-Public-Works-Projects/active-transportation-street-projects/Centerville-Turnpike-Bridge-Replacement-Feasibility-Study.htm
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Beltway

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4361 on: August 23, 2019, 11:56:51 PM »

Wonder what they would replace it with, a high-level bridge, or a modern movable span bridge like the Bus. VA-168 bridge over the ICW?  I'm sure it would be expensive.
Right now, they are only replacing parts on the bridge, such as the pivot which moves the bridge, along with other different components. They have to take the bridge out of service and move it to a different location in order to complete the necessary work. In 6 months, it will be put back and re-opened to traffic. The closure is only one part of the project though... the overall rehabilitation project began back in May and is to continue throughout 2020.
Presumably to take the swingspan to a work yard on land so that they can repair and maybe replace some of the steel beams.  Probably not feasible or would be much more difficult if done at the bridge.

In the future, roughly 15-20 years, the city eventually plans to replace the bridge entirely. The new bridge would be a 4 to 6 lane fixed-span bridge with a 65 foot navigational clearance and while no detailed cost estimate exists, the city estimates roughly ~$100 million. There's currently a feasibility study underway that is set to be completed in Summer 2020 that would look at different alignments, impacts, and detailed cost estimates.
I was thinking about why not replace it with a modern movable bridge, but I see that part of the problem is the grade that road is on, there is only 4 feet of vertical navigational clearance under the bridge when it is closed, so that means even small boats cannot pass under without the bridge being opened, and for the motorists that means more frequent stoppages of traffic to open the bridge.
See page 7: https://www.charts.noaa.gov/BookletChart/12206_BookletChart.pdf

So they could build a higher movable span bridge, with say 20 or 25 feet of vertical navigational clearance under the bridge when it is closed, or build a fixed bridge with 65 feet vertical navigational clearance.  Guesstimate of at least $50 or $60 million for the first option, and still have the maintenance of a movable span and some traffic stoppages, versus the ~$100 million for the fixed bridge.  Those are general estimates, but I can see the desirability  of spending more to eliminate openings once and for all.

I suppose that Centerville Turnpike will be all 4-laned in the not too distant future.

What about the VA-165 bridge?  Another movable bridge with only 6 feet of vertical navigational clearance under the bridge when it is closed.
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4362 on: August 24, 2019, 01:03:32 AM »

Probably not feasible or would be much more difficult if done at the bridge.
It wouldn't be feasible. If they worked on the existing location, the bridge wouldn't be movable during construction, therefore the channel would be blocked for maritime traffic for 6 months. There's probably a variety of other factors as well that make it infeasible.

What about the VA-165 bridge?  Another movable bridge with only 6 feet of vertical navigational clearance under the bridge when it is closed.
The North Landing Bridge (VA-165) is owned by the Army Corps of Engineers, unlike the Centerville Tpke bridge which is owned by the City of Chesapeake, and they are actively studying a replacement as well.

Back in March, a detailed Draft Feasibility Study / Environmental Assessment was completed that evaluated 5 different replacement options -

1) Replacement in Place - Movable Bridge - No cost provided
2) Replacement to East of Existing - Movable Bridge - $66.2 million
3) Replacement to East of Existing - Fixed Span - $74.3 million
4) Replacement to West of Existing - Movable Bridge - $58.2 million
5) Replacement to West of Existing - Fixed Span - $76 million

The first two options were removed from further study, leaving either a fixed span to either side of the existing bridge, or a west movable bridge being the remaining options. No preferred alternative was selected between those three, but the City of Chesapeake prefers a fixed span over a movable bridge. In this instance, the cheapest option, the West Movable, compared to the most expensive, the West Fixed, is only a difference of $17.8 million, and considering the benefits of a fixed span over a movable bridge, the fixed span seems worth the extra $17.8 million in the long run.

All of the bridge replacement alternatives are two-lane bridges consisting of one 12 foot travel lane and 10 foot shoulder in each direction with a maximum 4% grade. The projected AADT by 2040 on a fixed-span bridge is 17,310, so a two-lane bridge would likely suffice.

Here's the project website, where you can view the Draft Environmental Assessment - https://www.nao.usace.army.mil/NorthLandingBridge/
« Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 01:07:49 AM by sprjus4 »
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4363 on: August 24, 2019, 10:24:57 AM »

Probably not feasible or would be much more difficult if done at the bridge.
It wouldn't be feasible. If they worked on the existing location, the bridge wouldn't be movable during construction, therefore the channel would be blocked for maritime traffic for 6 months. There's probably a variety of other factors as well that make it infeasible.
I was thinking about leaving the swingspan open during construction, but that would be a balancing act and construction equipment would block the channel at times.

The construction yard might not be far away, maybe even on open land at the marina near the bridge.

The North Landing Bridge (VA-165) is owned by the Army Corps of Engineers, unlike the Centerville Tpke bridge which is owned by the City of Chesapeake, and they are actively studying a replacement as well.
Back in March, a detailed Draft Feasibility Study / Environmental Assessment was completed that evaluated 5 different replacement options -
Movable span options still at least 76% of the cost of a fixed high-level bridge, not as much difference as I would have thought.

Fixed, is only a difference of $17.8 million, and considering the benefits of a fixed span over a movable bridge, the fixed span seems worth the extra $17.8 million in the long run.
Greater right-of-way and environmental issues could be a factor in the fixed high-level bridge, given the longer length and greater footprint.  All that would have to be factored in.
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4364 on: August 24, 2019, 10:18:00 PM »

If a fixed span bridge is picked, would the City of Chesapeake toll this one also?
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4365 on: August 24, 2019, 11:29:06 PM »

If a fixed span bridge is picked, would the City of Chesapeake toll this one also?

I doubt it.  Virginia Beach's new Lesner Bridge on US-60 over the Lynnhaven Inlet cost about $100 million and it is not tolled.  Chesapeake does have the two toll roads, but the local bridges around the region are not tolled.
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BrianP

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4366 on: August 26, 2019, 06:13:59 PM »

I saw a new sign goof in Virginia.  The US 15 shields here have been replaced.
https://goo.gl/maps/VqXcGQrxcHoTY3eN9
That's not a surprise since those shields are in bad shape in streetview.  The goof is that they were replaced with VA primary route shields instead of US route shields.
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4367 on: August 26, 2019, 10:54:10 PM »

If a fixed span bridge is picked, would the City of Chesapeake toll this one also?

I doubt it.  Virginia Beach's new Lesner Bridge on US-60 over the Lynnhaven Inlet cost about $100 million and it is not tolled.  Chesapeake does have the two toll roads, but the local bridges around the region are not tolled.
I really didn't think so.  It just seems that whenever a new bridge has been built in Chesapeake lately, it gets tolled.

I am just remembering the days (1989-2013) when the only tolls in the area were the old Jordan Bridge and the CBBT.  And, yes, I did deal with the tunnel tolls in the 1980's while attending Old Dominion University, living in the Western Branch area of Chesapeake.  So, it was real nice driving in the Hampton Roads area without paying a toll someplace (I never drove over the Jordan Bridge then--I had no real reason to go in that area) in the early 1990's.

If the MMMBT was constructed and completed in this decade, it would more than likely be tolled.
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Beltway

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4368 on: August 26, 2019, 11:28:16 PM »

If a fixed span bridge is picked, would the City of Chesapeake toll this one also?
I doubt it.  Virginia Beach's new Lesner Bridge on US-60 over the Lynnhaven Inlet cost about $100 million and it is not tolled.  Chesapeake does have the two toll roads, but the local bridges around the region are not tolled.
I really didn't think so.  It just seems that whenever a new bridge has been built in Chesapeake lately, it gets tolled.

Huh?  One new bridge has been built with tolls, the high-level bridge on Dominion Boulevard.
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4369 on: August 26, 2019, 11:53:19 PM »

^ I know that; I am being a bit sarcastic because of the tolls. 

Although I currently live 620 miles away, I still like to keep informed with one of the areas I grew up in.  If I was still living in the area, I wouldn't like the tolls and would (could) find ways around them. 

Just my own thoughts on driving on bridges and through tunnels that used to be free.
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sprjus4

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4370 on: August 27, 2019, 01:40:38 AM »

If a fixed span bridge is picked, would the City of Chesapeake toll this one also?

I doubt it.  Virginia Beach's new Lesner Bridge on US-60 over the Lynnhaven Inlet cost about $100 million and it is not tolled.  Chesapeake does have the two toll roads, but the local bridges around the region are not tolled.
I really didn't think so.  It just seems that whenever a new bridge has been built in Chesapeake lately, it gets tolled.

I am just remembering the days (1989-2013) when the only tolls in the area were the old Jordan Bridge and the CBBT.  And, yes, I did deal with the tunnel tolls in the 1980's while attending Old Dominion University, living in the Western Branch area of Chesapeake.  So, it was real nice driving in the Hampton Roads area without paying a toll someplace (I never drove over the Jordan Bridge then--I had no real reason to go in that area) in the early 1990's.

If the MMMBT was constructed and completed in this decade, it would more than likely be tolled.
Also the Chesapeake Expressway completed in 2001 was tolled.

As for the MMMBT in this decade, there would likely be free and HO/T lanes sort of like the new HRBT being built.
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sprjus4

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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4371 on: August 27, 2019, 01:41:31 AM »

If a fixed span bridge is picked, would the City of Chesapeake toll this one also?
I doubt it.  Virginia Beach's new Lesner Bridge on US-60 over the Lynnhaven Inlet cost about $100 million and it is not tolled.  Chesapeake does have the two toll roads, but the local bridges around the region are not tolled.
I really didn't think so.  It just seems that whenever a new bridge has been built in Chesapeake lately, it gets tolled.

Huh?  One new bridge has been built with tolls, the high-level bridge on Dominion Boulevard.
Those tolls also helped fund the upgrade of 4 miles of two-lane road to a four-lane divided freeway with 3 urban interchanges.

Out of the entire $345 million project, roughly $80 million was given in state / federal funding. A new Centerville Bridge would likely be around $100 million, and could get that over time in state / federal funding.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2019, 01:43:59 AM by sprjus4 »
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4372 on: August 27, 2019, 10:03:48 AM »

If the MMMBT was constructed and completed in this decade, it would more than likely be tolled.
Also the Chesapeake Expressway completed in 2001 was tolled.
As for the MMMBT in this decade, there would likely be free and HO/T lanes sort of like the new HRBT being built.
Moot point.  VDOT and the localities had the foresight to advance I-664 and get it approved and funded under the original Interstate highway system where 90% FHWA funding was available.

A new Centerville Bridge would likely be around $100 million, and could get that over time in state / federal funding.
Arterial roads don't really lend themselves to effective tolling.  Projects like those expensive bridge replacements will simply wait until sufficient tax funds are available to replace them.  Some like the canal bridges on VA-165 and Bus. US-17 are owned by ACOE and will be funded by their federal funds.
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4373 on: August 27, 2019, 10:03:30 PM »

https://www.fredericksburg.com/news/local/vdot-scaling-back-northbound-rappahannock-river-crossing-project/article_66f7ff71-4974-547a-beaf-398651b23b46.html
Quote
Higher costs have forced transportation officials to shrink the size of the northbound Rappahannock River Crossing project, the third leg in a trio of major Interstate 95 projects aimed at easing congestion problems.

Nearly three dozen residents came to James Monroe High School on Thursday evening to view the final plans and talk to Virginia Department of Transportation officials about the $132 million project, which will add three lanes from just north of the Fall Hill Avenue overpass to U.S. 17.

The new lanes were originally planned to start south of the State Route 3 interchange, but the length was shortened because construction costs eclipsed the budget, according to VDOT officials.

Another project downgrade that I hope does not represent a coming trend. While this is somewhat unfortunate, you can't really blame anything other then insufficient funding. Ultimately, I believe this project will still significantly reduce the terrible weekend congestion through the area. However, I am praying that the option to extend the 4th lane to the Centrepoint parkway is funded in order help alleviate that northern merge.

Here are the full project details: http://www.virginiadot.org/projects/resources/Fredericksburg/I-95_NB_RRC_Aug._22_PH/NB_RRC_Presentation_Aug2019_PH.pdf
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Re: Virginia
« Reply #4374 on: August 27, 2019, 10:15:30 PM »

Another project downgrade that I hope does not represent a coming trend. While this is somewhat unfortunate, you can't really blame anything other then insufficient funding. Ultimately, I believe this project will still significantly reduce the terrible weekend congestion through the area. However, I am praying that the option to extend the 4th lane to the Centrepoint parkway is funded in order help alleviate that northern merge.
Here are the full project details: http://www.virginiadot.org/projects/resources/Fredericksburg/I-95_NB_RRC_Aug._22_PH/NB_RRC_Presentation_Aug2019_PH.pdf
The rebuilt I-95 northbound on-ramp from VA-3 will be 3 lanes until it merges with the new 3-lane northbound local roadway.

I am satisfied with that.  Provides 3 new northbound lanes between VA-3 and US-17.

Six miles I-95 widening between south of VA-3 and north of US-17 will be constructed 2018 to 2023, the C-D roadways with 3 lanes each way, which also serves as OC NWQ Corridor 5 (see below) that provides a local freeway connection between US-17 and VA-3 and Rappahannock River crossing.

This not only widens the I-95 general purpose lanes, but also builds the Outer Connector Northeast Quadrant Corridor 5 as presented in the 2001 DEIS.  The corridor out to the Lick Run area on VA-3 would have been much more effective, nevertheless this is the OC NWQ Corridor 5 that provides a local freeway connection between US-17 and VA-3, which provides a critical link for local traffic at a weak point in the Fredericksburg regional road system, as well as relief to I-95 and US-1 over the Rappahannock River.
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