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Author Topic: Routes that are difficult to clinch  (Read 7241 times)

froggie

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #75 on: December 16, 2018, 08:44:22 AM »

^ For an individual user, yes.  But not for all users at once.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #76 on: December 16, 2018, 10:46:14 AM »

CA 84 since it is in two inconveniently places segments; one which slogs trough the Bay Area and the other over a ferry route. 

hbelkins

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #77 on: December 16, 2018, 06:32:22 PM »

...US 6 ... doesn't really go anywhere that many people would want to go.

Cape Cod, Providence, Hartford, Bear Mountain, "the Grand Canyon of the East," Chicagoland (Joliet), Des Moines, Omaha, Denver, Glenwood Canyon. Hardly obscure places.
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oscar

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #78 on: December 16, 2018, 06:49:43 PM »

...US 6 ... doesn't really go anywhere that many people would want to go.

Cape Cod, Providence, Hartford, Bear Mountain, "the Grand Canyon of the East," Chicagoland (Joliet), Des Moines, Omaha, Denver, Glenwood Canyon. Hardly obscure places.

OTOH, you have to be pretty compulsive to clinch the whole route, or even major portions of it except for specific destinations, rather than stay on the Interstates that parallel most of the route.

Cameron Kaiser did it all in summer 2006.
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hbelkins

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #79 on: December 16, 2018, 10:15:45 PM »

...US 6 ... doesn't really go anywhere that many people would want to go.

Cape Cod, Providence, Hartford, Bear Mountain, "the Grand Canyon of the East," Chicagoland (Joliet), Des Moines, Omaha, Denver, Glenwood Canyon. Hardly obscure places.

OTOH, you have to be pretty compulsive to clinch the whole route, or even major portions of it except for specific destinations, rather than stay on the Interstates that parallel most of the route.

Cameron Kaiser did it all in summer 2006.

I remember that, and I wish his site fully covered the trip and didn't stop after Utah.

In all honesty, US 6 is one of the routes that I really would like to drive from end to end. I think it would be interesting because it covers such varied terrain.
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cpzilliacus

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #80 on: December 16, 2018, 10:15:55 PM »

I have not seen any mention of VA-42 upthread, which is chopped up into three segments.

Not so far away, the Blue Ridge Parkway can be closed during the winter season for the usual reasons in both Virginia and North Carolina.  Otherwise, it's just long

Then there's the matter of Quebec Route 138 (I have been on a few parts of this long ago).

From the U.S. border to Kegashka is long but possible, then there are several isolated segments that are not connected to other roads (one at La Romaine, maybe another at Chevery, another at Tête-à-la-Baleine, and maybe at La Tabatière). These appear to be reachable by coastal ferry.

The section from Old Fort (Vieux Fort), Quebec and east connects to the North American road network across Labrador.
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Beltway

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #81 on: December 16, 2018, 11:27:27 PM »

Clinch NC-12.  Several sections, a short ferry, a long ferry, and the long deadend to Corolla.
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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #82 on: December 17, 2018, 12:09:24 PM »

I have not seen any mention of VA-42 upthread, which is chopped up into three segments.

I actually have that route clinched, although not in one sitting. It's possible to drive between the disjointed segments via secondary routes, if I'm not mistaken, although I never attempted to do that.
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Mapmikey

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #83 on: December 17, 2018, 02:39:22 PM »

I have not seen any mention of VA-42 upthread, which is chopped up into three segments.

I actually have that route clinched, although not in one sitting. It's possible to drive between the disjointed segments via secondary routes, if I'm not mistaken, although I never attempted to do that.

Yes this is readily done...

Between the southern and central segment you use SR 730 which is a non-stop carnival of 25 mph curves, despite little change in elevation. 

Between the central and northern segment you use SR 615 to Eagle Rock to pick up US 220 north.  SR 615 is fairly decent and can be driven at near 55 mph in many places with the occasional 35-40 mph curve.
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Gnutella

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #84 on: February 27, 2019, 12:41:46 PM »

U.S. 64 in North Carolina. It's more than 600 miles long, changes direction several times, has many different segments built to vastly different standards, and doesn't pass through any major city other than Raleigh.
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oscar

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #85 on: February 27, 2019, 01:24:58 PM »

Any of the highways that take you through a National Park in mountainous areas.  In the winter, it's impassable due to snow; in the summer, it's a pain to navigate through the crowds piling into the park.  Possible examples include CA-120, UT-9, US2 in Montana, and anything passing through Yellowstone.

CA 120 officially ends at the national park's west boundary, and resumes at the east boundary. You still have to contend with the crowds, especially at the west boundary, but you can turn around before paying the stiff park entry fee. Of course, the detour needed to get to the rest of CA 120 is no cakewalk either, unless you can do the two segments on separate trips.

Similar situations for the US routes that officially end at the Yellowstone boundary, some of which restart on the other side (US 212, US 14, and US 16 simply end at the boundary, no need to go through or around the park to clinch).

US 2 in Montana runs south of Glacier National Park.
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Max Rockatansky

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #86 on: February 27, 2019, 01:41:23 PM »

Any of the highways that take you through a National Park in mountainous areas.  In the winter, it's impassable due to snow; in the summer, it's a pain to navigate through the crowds piling into the park.  Possible examples include CA-120, UT-9, US2 in Montana, and anything passing through Yellowstone.

CA 120 officially ends at the national park's west boundary, and resumes at the east boundary. You still have to contend with the crowds, especially at the west boundary, but you can turn around before paying the stiff park entry fee. Of course, the detour needed to get to the rest of CA 120 is no cakewalk either, unless you can do the two segments on separate trips.

Similar situations for the US routes that officially end at the Yellowstone boundary, some of which restart on the other side (US 212, US 14, and US 16 simply end at the boundary, no need to go through or around the park to clinch).

US 2 in Montana runs south of Glacier National Park.

And to make matters even more difficult CA 120 between US 395 and US 6 closes in the winter.  That said the route is quite doable if you hit it from the start either east from I-5 or west from US 6.  I’d personally rank routes like CA 4 given the massive length and incredibly difficult grade in the Sierras. 

paulthemapguy

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Re: Routes that are difficult to clinch
« Reply #87 on: February 27, 2019, 02:05:34 PM »

Any of the highways that take you through a National Park in mountainous areas.  In the winter, it's impassable due to snow; in the summer, it's a pain to navigate through the crowds piling into the park.  Possible examples include CA-120, UT-9, US2 in Montana, and anything passing through Yellowstone.

CA 120 officially ends at the national park's west boundary, and resumes at the east boundary. You still have to contend with the crowds, especially at the west boundary, but you can turn around before paying the stiff park entry fee. Of course, the detour needed to get to the rest of CA 120 is no cakewalk either, unless you can do the two segments on separate trips.

Similar situations for the US routes that officially end at the Yellowstone boundary, some of which restart on the other side (US 212, US 14, and US 16 simply end at the boundary, no need to go through or around the park to clinch).

US 2 in Montana runs south of Glacier National Park.

I should have specified that I was talking about the crowds of traffic on the ROADS TO AND FROM the national parks.  Those can royally screw you over in the summer months.  For example, I spent two hours waiting in traffic on CA-120 in July 2016, to finally reach our parking space inside Yosemite National Park (a 2-hr drive turned into a 4-hr drive).  The roads leading into and out of the park can be really difficult to cover because of the traffic heading in and out, regardless if you're technically within the park boundaries or not.  And good luck getting from one segment of a highway to the other if there's a national park between them without going through the park directly; the nearest detour route could take many hours to traverse.
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