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Author Topic: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?  (Read 3063 times)

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  • 69, 96, and 287
  • 63 in Louisiana
  • 14 and 16
  • 40 and 322
  • 270 in Kansas
  • 319 at 98
  • most of 400
  • 18 at 20
  • 25 and 341

I see no use for any of these; if they end at the same point, pick one, otherwise, truncate the one that ends there. Is there any reason why these exist, historical or otherwise? (Note: 270 has its own thread.)

Also, feel free to list more examples.
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40 and 322 at least both end at a major tourist destination, Atlantic City. 69, 96, and 287, not so much (Port Arthur TX).

I drove the latter useless triplex on my way to the Shreveport meet earlier this month. If it were a Northeastern state, I'd have guessed "gee, the sign shop workers must have a good union". But not Texas. Maybe its obsession with 69 includes US, not just Interstate, routes.
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US 62 and US 85 at the Mexican border, both after lenghty concurrencies with other routes. Their independent sections through El Paso can get away (or become a realigned US 180).

US 23 in Jacksonville. Again, the independent section can become anything else.
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US-280 in Birmingham ends concurrent with US-31 at I-20/I-59
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US 48 can go on this list now, since it has officially been extended and signed all the way west to Weston, WV, but the reason is to give Corridor H one continuous number.

Is it the only US route that has both ends at an interstate?
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Max Rockatansky

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319 ends at a former ferry location in Appalachlacola Bay, US 98 used to end on the other side.  For some reason 319 never got truncated when the bridge span was built.

US 89

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Several examples out near me:

14 and 16

US 14 and 16 both end at a major tourist location, Yellowstone National Park. That alone I would be OK with. However, for me the real issue with 14/16 is that they end on a multiplex with US 20, which continues on the other side of the park.
For sure US 16 should end at US 20 in Worland. US 14 is a little harder because there's an alternate route that goes over to Cody and ends at the 14/16/20 multiplex. 14A is closed in winter between its eastern end and US-310, so perhaps that route could become a state route.



US 189 enters Jackson, WY from the southwest concurrent with US 26/89/191, but 189 ends where the other three routes turn north in downtown Jackson. usends.com suggests that this was because US 89 was routed west of the Snake River and thus used WY 22 to enter Jackson. 189 went all the way up to Jackson so that it could junction its parent 89 (even though 189 already intersected 89 in Provo, UT). Anyway, since Hoback Junction does exist now, US 189 should probably be truncated back to its inital junction with US 89 (and 26) there. However, that still requires a multiplex with US 191. To completely remove US 189's concurrencies, the north end would have to be truncated back 79 miles to US 191 at Daniel Jct.



US 40's west end is also concurrent with another route, US 189. That's because US 189 used to be routed on today's UT-32, but 189 was moved to run concurrent with 40 when the US 40 freeway was built in 1990 or so. That highway is always referred to as US 40, and in fact 189 wasn't even signed on the 40/189 concurrency until last year.



US 163 for a long time ended at Crescent Jct on I-70, on a multiplex with US 191; that was because 163 was created before US 191 was extended through this area. US 163 hasn't been signed north of Bluff (its junction with US 191) since 191 was extended in 1982, but Utah didn't apply to AASHTO to officially truncate 163 to Bluff until 2008. AASHTO approved of this change, but even now UDOT still internally lists a silent 163/191 concurrency between Bluff and Crescent Jct.



US 277 is another route that ends on a concurrency, in this case with US 62. According to usends.com, 62/277 used to use surface roads into Oklahoma City, where 277 ended at its junction with parent US 77. The US routes in OKC were moved onto interstates in the 1960s, and 277 was truncated back to the point where it joined the freeway. This has resulted in a useless multiplex with US 62, and 277 no longer intersects its parent US 77.
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TheHighwayMan394

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Minnesota has a pair of these:

US 218 (with US 14): so 218 can connect to I-35.

US 53/71: much like I-69/94, so both routes connect to the border crossing in Internatiknal Falls.

Historically, US 77 may have duplexed with US 12 to US 75 at Ortonville, but thatís a bit ambiguous if that ever existed. There would have been no reason for that one.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2018, 05:44:25 PM by TheHighwayMan394 »
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ftballfan

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US 48 can go on this list now, since it has officially been extended and signed all the way west to Weston, WV, but the reason is to give Corridor H one continuous number.

Is it the only US route that has both ends at an interstate?
US-10 qualifies (its western end is at I-94 and its eastern end is at I-75)
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Max Rockatansky

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US 399 used to multiplex US 99 to US 466 in Bakersfield, I always found that one a little on the strange side when the natural north terminus would be US 99.  The multiplex can still be seen on the 1963 California state highway map city insert:

https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~239530~5511853:-Verso--State-Highway-Map,-Californ?sort=Pub_List_No_InitialSort%2CPub_Date%2CPub_List_No%2CSeries_No&qvq=q:caltrans;sort:Pub_List_No_InitialSort%2CPub_Date%2CPub_List_No%2CSeries_No;lc:RUMSEY~8~1&mi=30&trs=86

US 466 was co-signed with US 93 to US 66 in Kingman.  Interestingly US 466 predated US 93 over the Hoover Dam. 
« Last Edit: March 29, 2018, 06:46:38 PM by Max Rockatansky »
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2018, 06:46:17 PM »

US 62 and US 85 at the Mexican border, both after lenghty concurrencies with other routes. Their independent sections through El Paso can get away (or become a realigned US 180).

US 23 in Jacksonville. Again, the independent section can become anything else.
US 23 I believe was done so that Atlanta to Jacksonville had one continuous route.   Now that I-75 and I-10 together function for a freeway connection, I am surprised that AASHTO did not truncate US 23.

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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2018, 07:04:31 PM »

Some more former examples in California:

US 40 and US 50 ran together for about 9 miles between US 101 in San Francisco and today's MacArthur Maze interchange in Oakland from the 1930s to 1964.  (At one point - though I can't remember the map that showed this - this involved using Market Street and then a ferry from SF to Oakland, though the more familiar versions all involved the concurrency running along the Bay Bridge)

US 60 and 70 were concurrent at their west terminus in Los Angeles at the San Bernardino Split interchange with US 101, IIRC this was because US 70 was primarily extended west to give LA a second transcontinental route - and 70 never had independent mileage in its entire existence in California, either being co-signed with 60, 99, or later I-10.

US 6's "west" (more like south but curled over) terminus in Long Beach was concurrent with the then-Alternate US 101 (now Route 1) in Long Beach, as was US 91's southern terminus (but from the other side of Alternate US 101)

IIRC US 80 and US 395 ran concurrently for a few years into downtown San Diego (including a stretch along today's Route 163/Cabrillo Freeway) before terminating at the old US 101 routing along Harbor Drive

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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2018, 07:18:05 PM »

  • 69, 96, and 287
  • 63 in Louisiana
  • 14 and 16
  • 40 and 322
  • 270 in Kansas
  • 319 at 98
  • most of 400
  • 18 at 20
  • 25 and 341

I see no use for any of these; if they end at the same point, pick one, otherwise, truncate the one that ends there. Is there any reason why these exist, historical or otherwise? (Note: 270 has its own thread.)

Also, feel free to list more examples.
US 62 and US 85 at the Mexican border, both after lenghty concurrencies with other routes. Their independent sections through El Paso can get away (or become a realigned US 180).

US 23 in Jacksonville. Again, the independent section can become anything else.

62 & 85 drive me nuts.   
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roadman65

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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2018, 07:21:57 PM »

I always though that US 46 ending midspan on the GWB was strange.  I know NY did not want anymore US routes, but it should have ended at US 1 & 9 in Palisades Park or later at I-95 in Fort Lee.

However, US 46's existence is odd too, as it was not only out of the grid, but connected US 611 to NYC.  In other words a primary highway acting as a spur of a 3 digit child of another US route.  Back in the pre I-80 days my dad says to continue west of NJ from US 46 you had to use US 611 to US 6 to go points west, so it should have been really a 2 digit child of US 6, more like a US 306 or US 106 instead of what was the latter where NY again screwed up and chose NY 52 to be what should have been US 106.
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2018, 07:24:30 PM »

  • 69, 96, and 287
  • 63 in Louisiana
  • 14 and 16
  • 40 and 322
  • 270 in Kansas
  • 319 at 98
  • most of 400
  • 18 at 20
  • 25 and 341

I see no use for any of these; if they end at the same point, pick one, otherwise, truncate the one that ends there. Is there any reason why these exist, historical or otherwise? (Note: 270 has its own thread.)

Also, feel free to list more examples.
US 62 and US 85 at the Mexican border, both after lenghty concurrencies with other routes. Their independent sections through El Paso can get away (or become a realigned US 180).

US 23 in Jacksonville. Again, the independent section can become anything else.

62 & 85 drive me nuts.   
How about 77 & 83?  Why does US 83 continue east of Harligen anyway?  Hopefully with I-69E being there and US 77 possibly being truncated maybe TxDOT will petition to have it end at I-69E and not go further east.
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2018, 08:36:38 PM »

Quote
I see no use for any of these; if they end at the same point, pick one, otherwise, truncate the one that ends there. Is there any reason why these exist, historical or otherwise? (Note: 270 has its own thread.)



Historically there used to be way, way more of these, both short and long.  It was common practice to sign a route to the city center instead of it ending where it first runs into the other US highway just outside town.

Ones that are no longer around (certain I am failing to list many more):

US 701 at US 17
US 52-78 at one time duplexed to their endpoint
US 78 at US 17 before 1934
US 321-601 (then later just 321) at US 17 (I-95 jct)
US 74-76 east once ended together
US 258 at US 60 Fort Monroe
US 60-117 ended together in Virginia Beach
US 11 and US 65 both used to uselessly end in New Orleans
US 311 and US 220 in Madison NC
US 58-421 used to end together at Cumberland Gap
US 321 used to have a useless duplex to end in Bristol
US 220-309 used to end together
US 26 at US 101 Astoria
US 197 and US 830 used to end together
US 23-27-31 used to end together
US 31 into Mobile
US 302 into Montpelier
US 84 into Brunswick GA
US 280 into Savannah
US 82 into Las Cruces
US 180 east end several spots
US 219 into Princeton WV
US 17 into Fredericksburg
US 264 east end
US 117 with US 421 into Wilmington
US 411 into Bristol

Current examples not yet mentioned:
US 264 at US 64 Raleigh
US 360 at US 58 Bus Danville VA
US 211 at US 29 Bus Warrenton VA
US 42 and US 322 useless multiplex with US 6 to end in Cleveland
US 221 at US 460-501 Bus Lynchburg VA
US 25 at US 42-127 Cincinnati
US 33 at US 250 Richmond VA
US 340 at US 15 Frederick MD
US 17 at US 11-50-522 Winchester VA
US 401 north end with US 1
US 176 with US 25 Bus Hendersonville NC
« Last Edit: March 29, 2018, 09:13:38 PM by Mapmikey »
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paulthemapguy

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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2018, 09:09:02 PM »

OP did a really good job of pointing out really asinine ones.  Some terminal duplexes make sense, because drivers using the terminating route will want to know how to reach the route hosting its terminus, and vice versa.  US218 at I-35 is a good example of this--signing US218 along that stretch of US14 will help I-35 traffic find its way to US218, and vice versa.  It's a good communication practice.

As for US69/96/287 and the others mentioned in the OP, come on, man what the hell.  Why are these here
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2018, 11:08:16 PM »

  • 69, 96, and 287
  • 63 in Louisiana
  • 14 and 16
  • 40 and 322
  • 270 in Kansas
  • 319 at 98
  • most of 400
  • 18 at 20
  • 25 and 341

I see no use for any of these; if they end at the same point, pick one, otherwise, truncate the one that ends there. Is there any reason why these exist, historical or otherwise? (Note: 270 has its own thread.)

Also, feel free to list more examples.

They exist as a trail blazer. Leaving AC for a tourist, you may forget that 322 ends and 40 takes you the rest of the way. It is to basically show you how to get out of the location with what US routes that road surface leads to.
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2018, 12:21:18 AM »

US 69 and US 380 in Greenville, Texas. 380 nominally terminates at the 69 junction on the northwest side of town, but the highways are co-signed to I-30.
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #19 on: March 30, 2018, 01:51:58 AM »

US 69 and US 380 in Greenville, Texas. 380 nominally terminates at the 69 junction on the northwest side of town, but the highways are co-signed to I-30.

That's likely due to the fact that US 380 continues (more or less) due west from the I-30 trajectory east of Greenville and functionally serves as a northern DFW bypass (although over the years the north suburbs have reached and crossed 380).  Its regional role is more relevant to I-30 traffic than US 69 traffic, hence the relatively short multiplex.
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Brian556

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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2018, 02:11:50 AM »

US 72-Ends in Chattanooga TN, but could end in Kimball TN
US 81-Ends at I-35W in N Ft Worth TX, but could end at Bowie, TX
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2018, 03:03:50 AM »

US 26 used to qualify until the OTC decided it was useless: The overlap on US 101 from Astoria at US 30 to the split between Seaside and Cannon Beach.
I actually miss that one.
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #22 on: March 30, 2018, 04:09:25 AM »

US 48 can go on this list now, since it has officially been extended and signed all the way west to Weston, WV, but the reason is to give Corridor H one continuous number.

Is it the only US route that has both ends at an interstate?
US-10 qualifies (its western end is at I-94 and its eastern end is at I-75)
So does US 2's western segment, I-5 on the west end and I-75 on the east end.
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #23 on: March 30, 2018, 04:17:23 AM »

Michigan really doesn't have a ton of US highways. US 10 use to run multiplexed with US 23 and I-75 as well as US 24 just to end in Detroit it now ends in Bay City about 110 miles north of Detroit. I can think of a state highway example that it seems to make no sense but the purpose I believe is to let people know that the route is there and the example I'm talking about is M-43 ending at I-96 after multiplexing with M-52 for it's last mile or so. US 223 ends multiplexed with US 23 for some reason and that one really doesn't make any sense, as a matter of fact US 223 really doesn't make any sense anyway it does end both ends at other US highways but it's only about 45 miles long and could be downgraded to a state highway. At least if that happened then they could eliminate the stupid multiplex it has with US 23.
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Re: US routes that end concurrent with other US routes: why do they exist?
« Reply #24 on: March 30, 2018, 07:01:32 AM »

US 264 at US 64 Raleigh

Hopefully US-264 will be truncated back to Zebulon once it becomes I-587 between Zebulon and Greenville.
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