California 92 West


California 92 west
Leaving downtown Hayward, this is the first California 92 west reassurance shield (posted at the Watkins Street traffic signal). This shield is located southwest of the large intersection with Mission Boulevard, Foothill Boulevard and Jackson Street. The overpass in the distance carries the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) over California 92. The BART currently extends south to Fremont, and plans call for its eventual extension south to San Jose. Photo taken 12/30/04.
After the Interstate 880 (Nimitz Freeway) interchange, westbound California 92 approaches Exit 25B, Hesperian Boulevard in the city of Hayward. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The right two lanes of California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) west become exit only for Exit 25B, Hesperian Boulevard. Use Hesperian Boulevard north to Chabot College, the Hayward Air Terminal, and the unincorporated community of San Lorenzo. To the south, Hesperian Boulevard passes Mount Eden High School, then changes into Union City Boulevard upon entering Union City. The next exit along California 92 west is Exit 25A, Industrial Boulevard. Photos taken 02/18/12 and 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 reaches Exit 25B, Hesperian Boulevard. The next off-ramp is Exit 25A, Industrial Boulevard. Photo taken 02/18/12.
A new left lane will form ahead for high occupancy vehicles and carpools during commuting hours. This mileage sign after Exit 25B provides the distance to the next three exits/points of interest on California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) west: Exit 25A, Industrial Boulevard; Exit 24, Clawiter Road (Mount Eden Road) and Eden Landing Road; and the toll plaza for the San Mateo Bridge. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) reaches Exit 25A, Industrial Boulevard. The next exit is Exit 24, Clawiter Road (Mount Eden Road) and Eden Landing Road. The pull-through sign uses the San Mateo Bridge as the control point. Note the addition of the high occupancy vehicle (carpool) lane on the left, making westbound carry four through lanes. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Use Exit 24 to the Hayward Regional Shoreline and the Hayward Interpretive Center via Breakwater Avenue, the north frontage road to the freeway. This bayshore area allows for wildlife viewing near the salt evaporation ponds that are found on both sides of California 92 west of Exit 24. Photo taken 07/05/06.
This mileage sign after Exit 25A provides the distance to the next three exits/points of interest on California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) west: Exit 24, Clawiter Road (Mount Eden Road) and Eden Landing Road; the toll plaza for the San Mateo Bridge; and Exit 14B, Foster City Boulevard. The distance between exits is about ten miles. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) west reaches Exit 24, Clawiter Road (Mount Eden Road). Upon exiting, follow the signs for Breakwater Avenue to get to the interpretive center on the north side of the freeway; turn south to follow Eden Landing Road. To the north, Clawiter Road passes through industrial west Hayward, connecting with Winton Avenue near the Air National Guard Base at the Hayward Air Terminal. Photo taken 07/05/06.
California 92 passes under Clawiter Road. Photo taken 02/18/12.
A pedestrian bridge soars across the freeway with an arc, and a banner touting FasTrack, the electronic toll collection system, was posted on the bridge's fence. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Another mileage sign for westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) is posted shortly thereafter. The toll plaza is one mile ahead, and the ensuing three exits are on the Peninsula: Exit 14B, Foster City Boulevard; Exit 14A, Baker Way to Bridgepointe Parkway; and Exits 13B-A, U.S. 101 (Bayshore Freeway). At this point, all traffic is dedicated to crossing the bay. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Now approaching the toll plaza, the redesigned and widened freeway has a dedicated lane for FasTrack users. Photo taken 07/05/06.

The toll plaza has a variety of signs for specific users of the bridge: FasTrack users, high occupancy vehicles/carpools, trucks, and wide loads. During certain hours, high occupancy vehicles may use the bridge for free (which is common practice at all Bay Area toll bridges). Photo taken 07/05/06.
With the widening and retrofitting of the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge in the early and mid-2000s, the toll plaza was replaced and improved. After this toll plaza, California 92 will leave the mainland and travel on a causeway over San Francisco Bay. Photo taken 07/05/06.
A bank of metering lights are placed after the toll plaza to regulate the flow of traffic onto the bridge during times of heavy use. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 prepares to leave the mainland and cross the seven-mile San Mateo-Hayward Bridge. The causeway section of the San Mateo Bridge extends five miles across the bay before rising at the high-rise steel girder bridge, which accounts for the remaining two miles. The San Mateo Bridge ends in Foster City in San Mateo County. Photo taken 07/05/06.
California 92 - San Mateo-Hayward Bridge west
Originally built as a crossing in 1929, the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge was replaced with the current span in 1967 and widened in 2004 to its current six-lane configuration with full shoulders. This upgrade was coupled with improvements along California 92' eastern approach from Interstate 880 to the toll plaza. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Call boxes for emergencies are located at regular intervals along the bridge on both sides of the bridge. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The low clouds and fog that had dominated the morning sky began to dissipate as we continue west along California 92/San Mateo Bridge. When originally built in 1929, the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge was the longest bridge in the world. Other bridges have since usurped that title. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Close to mid-span, westbound California 92 leaves Alameda County and the city of Hayward and enters San Mateo County and the city of Foster City. With four square miles, Foster City is notable for being almost entirely located on landfill in what would otherwise be San Francisco Bay. With the Marina Lagoon acting as Foster city's western border, the city is almost entirely surrounded by water. Per the 2000 Census, 28,803 people call Foster City home. Photo taken 07/05/06.
On the south side of the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge, tall Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) power transmission lines parallel the bridge. The tall pylons follow California 92 west to the Peninsula, then connect to transmission lines that travel north toward San Francisco. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The tall steel girder section of the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge comes into view as the causeway section approaches its end. Photo taken 07/05/06.
When the causeway section of the bridge ends, the right and left shoulders end. The freeway then ascends over the high part of the bridge to allow boats to cross under the bridge. Photos taken 07/05/06.
Now descending from the high point of the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge, the skyline of Foster City comes into view, as well as an additional fog bank that hugs the Santa Cruz Mountains in the distance. California 92 will travel over the Santa Cruz Mountains as a two-lane highway for the connection to Half Moon Bay. Photos taken 07/05/06.
California 92 west
The next exit along westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) is Exit 14B, Chess Drive to Foster City Boulevard and E. Hillsdale Boulevard. Upon exiting, follow Chess Drive east to Foster City Boulevard, then turn south on the boulevard to east-west Hillsdale Boulevard. Photos taken 02/18/12 and 07/05/06.
Use Exit 14B to Third Avenue via Foster City Boulevard north. Traveling east, Third Avenue enters the city of San Mateo and becomes J. Hart Clinton Drive. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) reaches Exit 14B, Chess Drive to Foster City Boulevard and E. Hillsdale Boulevard. The next exit is Exit 14A, Mariners Island Boulevard and Edgewater Boulevard. California 92 leaves Foster City and enters the city of San Mateo' Marina Lagoon neighborhood. Photos taken 02/18/12 and 07/05/06.
The next exit along California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) is Exit 14A, Baker Way to Fashion Island Boulevard. Photo taken 02/18/12.
Several Pacific Gas and Electric power lines cross over California 92. Photo taken 02/18/12.
California 92 enters the city of San Mateo (population 97,207 as of the 2010 Census). The city was home to 92,482 people as of the 2000 Census after the city experienced a 8.2% growth rate between 1990 and 2000. Several neighborhoods constitute the city of San Mateo: To the north of California 92 west of U.S. 101 is the Hayward Village neighborhood, and to the south is the Hillsdale neighborhood. Photo taken 02/18/12.
Shortly thereafter, westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) reaches Exit 14A, Baker Way to Fashion Island Boulevard, which connects to Mariners Island Boulevard (north) and Edgewater Boulevard (south). Edgewater Boulevard reenters Foster City to the south. Photos taken 02/18/12 and 07/05/06.
The next five exits on westbound California 92 are Exit 13B, U.S. 101 (Bayshore Freeway) north to San Francisco; Exit 13A, U.S. 101 (Bayshore Freeway) south to San Jose and Los Angeles; Exit 12C, Delaware Street; Exit 12B, California 82 (El Camino Real) north to San Mateo; and Exit 12A, California 82 (El Camino Real) south to Belmont and San Carlos. This sign features a rare white on green U.S. 101 shield. Photos taken 02/18/12 and 07/05/06.
A California 92 west reassurance shield is posted shortly thereafter. Photo taken 02/18/12.
The right two lanes of westbound California 92 become exit only for Exit 13B, U.S. 101 (Bayshore Freeway) north to San Francisco and Exit 13A, U.S. 101 (Bayshore Freeway) south to San Jose and Los Angeles. The left two lanes continue west on California 92 to Half Moon Bay. Photos taken 02/18/12 and 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 reaches Exit 13B, U.S. 101 (Bayshore Freeway) north to San Francisco. The next exit is Exit 13A, U.S. 101 (Bayshore Freeway) south to San Jose and Los Angeles. U.S. 101 is one of two major north-south freeway corridors on the Peninsula, and it is the most direct route from here to San Francisco (an alternate is Interstate 280). In addition, California 82 (El Camino Real) offers the local route through the Peninsula cities. Photos taken 02/18/12 and 07/05/06.
Shortly thereafter, westbound California 92 reaches Exit 13A, U.S. 101 (Bayshore Freeway) south to San Jose and Los Angeles. California 92 passes through the heart of the city of San Mateo. The following off-ramp will be Exit 12C, Delaware Street. Photos taken 02/18/12 and 07/05/06.
The next four exits on westbound California 92 are Exit 12C, Delaware Street; Exit 12B, California 82 (El Camino Real) north to San Mateo; Exit 12A, California 82 (El Camino Real) south to Belmont and San Carlos; and Exit 11, Alameda de las Pulgas. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Briefly gaining an auxiliary lane after the U.S. 101 interchange, the right lane becomes exit only for Exit 12C, Delaware Street. Use Delaware Street south to the San Mateo County Fairgrounds. This exit also serves Concar Drive, a Caltrain Station, and post office. The Caltrain offers commuter rail service between San Jose and San Francisco. The left two lanes continue west on California 92. Photo taken 07/05/06.
An increasingly rare butterfly gantry (signbridge) serves as the gore point for the westbound California 92 off-ramp to Exit 12C, Delaware Street. The next interchange along westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) is Exits 12B-A, California 82 (El Camino Real). The section of California 92 between U.S. 101 and Alameda de las Pulgas is also sometimes referred to as the 19th Avenue Freeway. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The next exit on westbound California 92 is Exit 12B, California 82 (El Camino Real) north to San Mateo. The second exit connects to Exit 12A, California 82 (El Camino Real) south to Belmont and San Carlos. California 82 follows the original route of U.S. 101 along the Peninsula from San Jose north to San Francisco. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Immediately thereafter, westbound California 92 reaches Exit 12A, California 82 (El Camino Real) south to Belmont and San Carlos. The next interchange along California 92 west is Exit 11, Alameda de las Pulgas. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Climbing the Santa Cruz Mountains foothills, a California 92 west reassurance shield assembly is posted after the junction with California 82 (El Camino Real). The California 92 freeway is much narrower here, with only a jersey barrier separating the two directions of travel. In the distance ahead is Exit 11, Alameda de las Pulgas. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 reaches Exit 11, Alameda de las Pulgas. Use Alameda de las Pulgas north to Hillsborough and south to Belmont. Parts of this road were built to divided highway standards south of California 92. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The next three exits along California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) west are Exit 10, Hillsdale Boulevard; Exit 9B, De Anza Boulevard/Polhemus Road; and Exit 9A, Ralston Avenue. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The next exit along California 92 west is Exit 10, Hillsdale Boulevard. Hillsdale Boulevard parallels California 92 between Exit 14B and Exit 10 to the south of the freeway. Use this exit to the College of San Mateo via Hillsdale Boulevard west. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 reaches Exit 10, Hillsdale Boulevard. From this interchange to the junction with Interstate 280, westbound California 92 will actually travel due south or southwest. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The next exit along California 92 west (south) is Exit 9B, De Anza Boulevard/Polhemus Road. This interchange serves unincorporated community of The Highlands (west of the freeway) and western San Mateo (east of the freeway). Photo taken 07/05/06.
The final three exits along California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) west are Exit 9B, De Anza Boulevard/Polhemus Road; Exit 9A, Ralston Avenue; and Exit 8, Interstate 280 north to San Francisco and south to San Jose. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) reaches Exit 9B, De Anza Boulevard/Polhemus Road to The Highlands and western San Mateo. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The next exit along California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) west is Exit 9A, Ralston Avenue. This interchange serves Polhemus Road north to The Highlands and Ralston Avenue east to the city of Belmont. California 92 itself remains within the city of San Mateo until reaching this exit; afterward, California 92 enters unincorporated San Mateo County. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The final two exits along California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) west are Exit 9A, Ralston Avenue and Exit 8, Interstate 280 north to San Francisco and south to San Jose. After Interstate 280, the freeway ends and California 92 continues west as a two-lane highway. California 92 meets California 35 (Skyline Boulevard), and the two routes will share an alignment through the San Francisco State Fish and Game Refuge near Lower and Upper Crystal Springs Reservoirs. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) reaches Exit 9A, Ralston Avenue. The next interchange is Exit 8, Interstate 280 (Father Junipero Serra Freeway) north to San Francisco and south to San Jose. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Shortly thereafter, westbound California 92 (J. Arthur Younger Freeway) reaches Exit 8, Interstate 280 (Father Junipero Serra Freeway) north to San Francisco and south to San Jose. Known as one of the most scenic freeways in the nation, Interstate 280 (Father Junipero Serra Freeway) provides a bypass of most peninsular cities between San Jose and San Francisco. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The Interstate 280 interchange is a massive stack, with the connection to southbound Interstate 280 afforded via a subway. Other tall transition ramps make the other connections between Interstate 280 and California 92. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The freeway ends in one-quarter mile. This is the first time California 92 has dropped below freeway grade since leaving downtown Hayward at the Interstate 880 interchange. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The tallest transition ramp connects northbound Interstate 280 with California 92 west. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Lurking on the west side of the massive Interstate 280 interchange is a traffic signal for Canada Road, which travels south through the San Francisco State Fish and Game Refuge, then emerges in the city of Woodside, where it meets California 94/Woodside Road. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The J. Arthur Younger Freeway ends, and California 92 continues west via Canada Road for a short distance (until meeting California 35 (Skyline Boulevard) north). For this short distance, California 92 will travel north alongside Interstate 280. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Now on two-lane California 92, the aforementioned tall transition ramp from Interstate 280 (Father Junipero Serra Freeway) merges onto westbound. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The next intersection along westbound California 92 is with California 35 (Skyline Boulevard) north. Use California 35 north to Interstate 280 at Exit 34. California 35 (Skyline Boulevard) continues on its own at Exit 41 near San Andreas Lake, aiming north toward Daly City and ultimately its northern terminus at California 1 (19th Avenue) in San Francisco. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 (Canada Road) meets California 35 (Skyline Boulevard) north at this traffic signal. California 35 south and California 92 merge together for the remaining distance through the state refuge. Photo taken 07/05/06.
California 35 south & 92 west
A reassurance shield assembly for California 92 west and California 35 south is posted shortly after the Skyline Boulevard intersection. From here west, California 92 is known as Half Moon Bay Road. Photo taken 07/05/06.
California 92 west and California 35 south travel along an isthmus formed between the Lower Crystal Springs Reservoir to the north and Upper Crystal Springs Reservoir to the south. These reservoirs are the termination point for the massive Hetch Hetchy aqueduct, which carries freshwater from the Hetch Hetchy reservoir in the Sierra Nevada near Yosemite National Park. This reservoir stores water used by the city of San Francisco for drinking. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The final seven miles of California 92 cover mountainous and winding terrain before descending to Half Moon Bay. Frequent curves and grades are common. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The routes prepare to divide: California 92 continues west over the Santa Cruz Mountains to Half Moon Bay, while California 35 turns south again toward Kings Mountain and Sky Londa. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Prior to the California 35/92 split, a right turn to Skylawn Drive connects to a cemetery. Photo taken 07/05/06.
California 92 west continues straight ahead, while California 35 south makes a left turn. To the south of Half Moon Bay, California 1 follows the coast and is the best route from here to Santa Cruz (hence why Santa Cruz appears as destination city for westbound California 92 - the idea is not to use California 35, which is a much slower and leisurely drive). Photo taken 07/05/06.
Use California 35 (Skyline Boulevard) south to Big Basin Redwoods State Park via California 9 south to California 236 south. California 92 continues west toward Half Moon Bay. Notably, at the time this picture was taken, California 1 was closed at Devil's Slide, meaning that access to Pacifica and San Francisco via California 1 was not possible due to ongoing repair work. Photo taken 07/05/06.
California 92 west
Dropping down the Santa Cruz Mountains, a concrete barrier separates the two directions of traffic along westbound California 92 (Half Moon Bay Road). On this day, the fog grew deeper as the highway approached the Pacific Ocean, and temperatures quickly dropped from the 80s to the 60s. Photos taken 07/05/06.
The eastbound lanes of California 92 include an uphill climbing lane, while the westbound lane has no passing zones. Tall retaining walls help protect the highway from runoff from the nearby mountains. Traffic was especially high this day because of the California 1 north (Devils Slide) closure. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Crossing Pilarcitos Creek, westbound California 92 (Half Moon Bay Road) begins to straighten out. The state route will follow Pilarcitos Creek west to Half Moon Bay. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Residences, ranches, and small farms line California 92 as it proceeds west toward Half Moon Bay. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Westbound California 92 enters the city of Half Moon Bay. Home to 11,842 people as of the 2000 Census, Half Moon Bay was incorporated as a city in 1959 after a growth spurt after World War II. Discussions from that era included the conversion of California 92 into an expressway or freeway from Interstate 280 west to California 1. Photo taken 07/05/06.
Approaching Main Street, California 92 skirts the northern edge of downtown Half Moon Bay. Turn left (south) on Main Street to enter downtown and visit its many shops, restaurants, and other attractions. An old concrete bridge (built in 1900) carries Main Street over Pilarcitos Creek. Photo taken 07/05/06.
In addition to being a tourist draw, Half Moon Bay is a working fishing village. Several stores sell fresh fish, including many in Princeton and El Granada north of Half Moon Bay. Westbound California 92 meets Main Street at this traffic signal. Photo taken 07/05/06.
After Main Street, westbound California 92 approaches California 1. Travel north on California 1 to El Granada, Princeton, Pillar Point Harbor, Moss Beach, Montara, and Devils Slide. Once California 1 north reopens, the highway can be used to connect with Pacifica, Daly City, and San Francisco. Photo taken 07/05/06.
An end California 92 shield assembly is posted at the junction with California 1. To the south, California 1 travels along the coast toward San Gregorio, Pescadero Point, Pigeon Point Lighthouse, Point A-o Nuevo, Davenport, and Santa Cruz. Much of the route to Santa Cruz is two lanes; from Santa Cruz south to Monterey, California 1 has some freeway segments. Photo taken 07/05/06.
The right lane of California 92 transitions onto northbound California 1, while the left two lanes turn south onto California 1. Use California 1 south to Kelly Avenue west to Half Moon Bay State Beach. The Half Moon Bay Ritz Carlton hotel is also reached via California 1 south to Fairway Drive west. Photo taken 07/05/06.


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Page Updated September 23, 2013.

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