AARoads Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

New rules for political content in signatures and user profiles. See this thread for details.

Author Topic: Massachusetts  (Read 216991 times)

Ben114

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 262
  • yep that's me

  • Age: 16
  • Location: far far away
  • Last Login: Today at 04:43:12 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1275 on: October 05, 2019, 07:48:08 PM »

I am not sure what the solution is for the Pike east of I-84.  Another bad aspect of that road is that drivers slow down on upgrades.  So...flatten it out. :D
I would favor a cars only/all vehicles split, widen to 12 lanes total.
That's rather extreme. 8 lanes should suffice for most circumstances.

I would say 8 lanes east of I-84, 10 lanes inside 495, and 12 lanes inside 128 up to Allston/Brighton.  Inside of there, it gets a little tough with the city street grid.
With this, probably include a better connection from the Pike to Storrow Drive to keep traffic flowing with the lane drop after the interchange.
Logged

Alps

  • Everybody Obeys the Octagon
  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12875
  • Elimitante the truck trarffic,

  • Age: 36
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 01:36:56 PM
    • Alps' Roads
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1276 on: October 06, 2019, 12:02:59 AM »

I am not sure what the solution is for the Pike east of I-84.  Another bad aspect of that road is that drivers slow down on upgrades.  So...flatten it out. :D
I would favor a cars only/all vehicles split, widen to 12 lanes total.
That's rather extreme. 8 lanes should suffice for most circumstances.

I would say 8 lanes east of I-84, 10 lanes inside 495, and 12 lanes inside 128 up to Allston/Brighton.  Inside of there, it gets a little tough with the city street grid. 
I still disagree. 8 lanes seems fine all the way up to 128 unless you're really in a peak day like Thanksgiving. Inside there would take more study.

DJStephens

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 632
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Dona Ana NM/Tucson AZ
  • Last Login: Today at 04:46:13 AM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1277 on: October 06, 2019, 01:35:31 AM »

I am not sure what the solution is for the Pike east of I-84.  Another bad aspect of that road is that drivers slow down on upgrades.  So...flatten it out. :D
I would favor a cars only/all vehicles split, widen to 12 lanes total.
That's rather extreme. 8 lanes should suffice for most circumstances.

I would say 8 lanes east of I-84, 10 lanes inside 495, and 12 lanes inside 128 up to Allston/Brighton.  Inside of there, it gets a little tough with the city street grid.

The Turnpike is a pre-Interstate design.   Yes it should be reconstructed at some point between 84 and 128, completely, by opening up the median, blasting rock faces outwards, and flattening vertical curves.   All new two span bridges, also, replacing early/mid fifties four span overpasses. 
Don't believe any widening could be done E of 128, due to a narrow footprint, and air right construction over the highway itself.  Newtonville and Newton Corner.   Have to wonder though why the Turnpike authority in the early sixties did not specify an eight lane cross section all the way out to 128.     The section E of route 128 was known for a long time as the Turnpike Extension, as the section W of 128 had been finished and open for at least 10-12 years before the Extension construction was underway.   
« Last Edit: October 06, 2019, 01:39:40 AM by DJStephens »
Logged

PaulRAnderson

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 21
  • Location: West Boylston MA
  • Last Login: October 06, 2019, 03:14:01 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1278 on: October 06, 2019, 03:14:01 PM »

Quote
I would say 8 lanes east of I-84, 10 lanes inside 495, and 12 lanes inside 128 up to Allston/Brighton.  Inside of there, it gets a little tough with the city street grid.

The portion between I-84 and I-290 is choked up more than any other stretch.  Start with eight lanes there.
Logged

RobbieL2415

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1140
  • Location: Hartford County, CT
  • Last Login: December 08, 2019, 07:09:44 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1279 on: October 06, 2019, 03:26:15 PM »

Quote
I would say 8 lanes east of I-84, 10 lanes inside 495, and 12 lanes inside 128 up to Allston/Brighton.  Inside of there, it gets a little tough with the city street grid.

The portion between I-84 and I-290 is choked up more than any other stretch.  Start with eight lanes there.
Or add climbing lanes.
Logged

Route99

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 2
  • Location: Eastern Mass.
  • Last Login: December 05, 2019, 11:35:26 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1280 on: October 06, 2019, 09:26:01 PM »

I am not sure what the solution is for the Pike east of I-84.  Another bad aspect of that road is that drivers slow down on upgrades.  So...flatten it out. :D
I would favor a cars only/all vehicles split, widen to 12 lanes total.
That's rather extreme. 8 lanes should suffice for most circumstances.

I would say 8 lanes east of I-84, 10 lanes inside 495, and 12 lanes inside 128 up to Allston/Brighton.  Inside of there, it gets a little tough with the city street grid.

The Turnpike is a pre-Interstate design.   Yes it should be reconstructed at some point between 84 and 128, completely, by opening up the median, blasting rock faces outwards, and flattening vertical curves.   All new two span bridges, also, replacing early/mid fifties four span overpasses. 
Don't believe any widening could be done E of 128, due to a narrow footprint, and air right construction over the highway itself.  Newtonville and Newton Corner.   Have to wonder though why the Turnpike authority in the early sixties did not specify an eight lane cross section all the way out to 128.     The section E of route 128 was known for a long time as the Turnpike Extension, as the section W of 128 had been finished and open for at least 10-12 years before the Extension construction was underway.   

At the time the Extension was built, construction of the Inner Belt (I-695) was still planned, with an interchange in the area where Comm. Ave crosses the Pike.  It was probably expected that much less traffic would use the part of the Pike west of that, since Rte 2 and the unbuilt SouthWest Expy (original I-95) would have been easily accessed alternatives.

That section should ideally be widened to 4 lanes, but it is probably not practical. One improvement that could be made would be to redesign the messy interchange with Rte 95/128 and Rte 30 now that the tollbooths are gone. 
Logged

PHLBOS

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6904
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Greater Philly, PA
  • Last Login: Today at 01:54:00 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1281 on: October 07, 2019, 09:24:15 AM »

Have to wonder though why the Turnpike authority in the early sixties did not specify an eight lane cross section all the way out to 128
Much of the Pike's Boston Extension was constructed adjacent to very active railroad corridors & tracks.  An 8-lane corridor plus shoulders would've drastically impacted those rail lines.

Historic note: Fred Salvucci's grandmother was evicted from her home due to the construction of the Boston Extension.  This would be the same Fred Salvucci that would later become Gov. Dukakis' Transportation Secretary and the master architect of the Big Dig.

At the time the Extension was built, construction of the Inner Belt (I-695) was still planned, with an interchange in the area where Comm. Ave crosses the Pike.  It was probably expected that much less traffic would use the part of the Pike west of that, since Rte 2 and the unbuilt SouthWest Expy (original I-95) would have been easily accessed alternatives.
Quite true.  Had the inner Belt (I-695) & the Route 2 Connector been built, a fair amount of east-west traffic would've used those roadways instead of the Boston Extension.

That section should ideally be widened to 4 lanes, but it is probably not practical.
See above.  Much of the Boston Extension abuts active railroad tracks.

One improvement that could be made would be to redesign the messy interchange with Rte 95/128 and Rte 30 now that the tollbooths are gone.
It's worth noting that some minor tweaks were done to that interchange, mostly on the Pike's end since those toll booths came down.  Given the surrounding area & unlike the I-495 interchange in Hopkinton, I don't believe there's too much one can do with the Weston (I-95 (MA 128)/MA 30) interchange without totally disturbing the surrounding area.  Not to mention that traffic would still need to be maintained during the construction process.
Logged
GPS does NOT equal GOD

roadman

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 3864
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Boston, MA
  • Last Login: Today at 04:47:30 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1282 on: October 07, 2019, 10:25:20 AM »

Quote
I would say 8 lanes east of I-84, 10 lanes inside 495, and 12 lanes inside 128 up to Allston/Brighton.  Inside of there, it gets a little tough with the city street grid.

The portion between I-84 and I-290 is choked up more than any other stretch.  Start with eight lanes there.
Or add climbing lanes.

Grades are not severe enough between I-84 and I-290 in either direction to justify climbing lanes.  However, at a minimum, they should extend the fourth lane eastbound that begins at I-84 from beyond the current lane drop to well past the entrance from the eastbound Charlton service plaza.  This is probably the biggest recurring congestion point, even when traffic is relatively light otherwise.
Logged
"And ninety-five is the route you were on.  It was not the speed limit sign."  - Jim Croce (from Speedball Tucker)

"My life has been a tapestry
Of years of roads and highway signs" (with apologies to Carole King and Tom Rush)

Rothman

  • *
  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 5201
  • Last Login: Today at 04:44:22 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1283 on: October 07, 2019, 12:04:18 PM »

Drivers on the Pike have begun to slow down on the weakest of grades.
Logged
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

RobbieL2415

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1140
  • Location: Hartford County, CT
  • Last Login: December 08, 2019, 07:09:44 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1284 on: October 07, 2019, 05:41:46 PM »

Drivers on the Pike have begun to slow down on the weakest of grades.
It's the trucks that are the problem.  They take the center lane to pass someone and then they slow down on the upgrade.
Logged

Rothman

  • *
  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 5201
  • Last Login: Today at 04:44:22 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1285 on: October 07, 2019, 07:53:58 PM »

Drivers on the Pike have begun to slow down on the weakest of grades.
It's the trucks that are the problem.  They take the center lane to pass someone and then they slow down on the upgrade.
I don't think so.  Plenty of passenger vehicles slow down of their own accord.
Logged
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

Alps

  • Everybody Obeys the Octagon
  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12875
  • Elimitante the truck trarffic,

  • Age: 36
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 01:36:56 PM
    • Alps' Roads
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1286 on: October 07, 2019, 09:52:03 PM »


Historic note: Fred Salvucci's grandmother was evicted from her home due to the construction of the Boston Extension.  This would be the same Fred Salvucci that would later lead the effort to kill off the Inner Belt, Southwest and Northeast Expressways, and brag about it.
FTFY. Source: had him as a lecturer.

PHLBOS

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 6904
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Greater Philly, PA
  • Last Login: Today at 01:54:00 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1287 on: October 08, 2019, 09:07:43 AM »

Historic note: Fred Salvucci's grandmother was evicted from her home due to the construction of the Boston Extension.  This would be the same Fred Salvucci that would later lead the effort to kill off the Inner Belt, Southwest and Northeast Expressways, and brag about it.
FTFY. Source: had him as a lecturer.
While the contents of your edit are, no doubt, true; such doesn't change the fact that he was Gov. Dukakis' Transportation Secretary from 1975-1979 and 1983-1991 and backed the Big Dig while serving under Gov. Dukakis.  Local newspapers, the Boston Herald in particular, in the mid-to-late 1980s referred to the Big Dig project as Freddie's Nightmare.

Initially the Big Dig proposal only involved replacing the Central Artery but no Third Harbor (Ted Williams) Tunnel.  Such changed sometime during the 1980s when the proposed alignment of the tunnel (originally planned to run through the Fort Point Channel (based on old plans/reports)) was realigned to what was ultimately built. 

With regards to your above-edit/fix to my earlier post; I would've personally have done the following:

Quote from: PHLBOS unedited reply
This would be the same Fred Salvucci that would later become Gov. Dukakis' Transportation Secretary and the master architect of the Big Dig.

Quote from: Suggested Alps quote
This was also the same Fred Salvucci that would later lead the effort to kill off the Inner Belt, Southwest and Northeast Expressways, and brag about it.  I know this because I had him as a lecturer.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2019, 09:19:02 AM by PHLBOS »
Logged
GPS does NOT equal GOD

roadman

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 3864
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Boston, MA
  • Last Login: Today at 04:47:30 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1288 on: October 08, 2019, 09:32:09 AM »

Salvucci backed the Big Dig largely because of the public transportation improvements that were promised as mitigation.  While work on the Green Line Extension, which has taken way too long to complete and has gone horribly over budget, is still under way, the MBTA has cancelled restoration of light rail to Arborway and has delayed the Red-Blue Line connector.
Logged
"And ninety-five is the route you were on.  It was not the speed limit sign."  - Jim Croce (from Speedball Tucker)

"My life has been a tapestry
Of years of roads and highway signs" (with apologies to Carole King and Tom Rush)

Rothman

  • *
  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 5201
  • Last Login: Today at 04:44:22 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1289 on: October 08, 2019, 04:47:07 PM »

Salvucci backed the Big Dig largely because of the public transportation improvements that were promised as mitigation.  While work on the Green Line Extension, which has taken way too long to complete and has gone horribly over budget, is still under way, the MBTA has cancelled restoration of light rail to Arborway and has delayed the Red-Blue Line connector.
From what I've seen in his interviews, public transportation benefits were nowhere near "largely" a reason for his support of the Big Dig.
Logged
Please note: All comments here represent my own personal opinion and do not reflect the official position(s) of NYSDOT.

SectorZ

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1011
  • Age: 41
  • Location: Tewksbury, MA
  • Last Login: Today at 03:24:33 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1290 on: October 08, 2019, 09:52:07 PM »

Drivers on the Pike have begun to slow down on the weakest of grades.
It's the trucks that are the problem.  They take the center lane to pass someone and then they slow down on the upgrade.
I don't think so.  Plenty of passenger vehicles slow down of their own accord.

That's not just the Pike in Massachusetts. 495, on the tiny grades near the Chelmsford rest area or the borderline-unnoticeable hill near MA 133 in Tewksbury, traffic slows considerably and in rush hour grinds to a halt briefly. Wish people knew how to use cruise control...
Logged

roadman

  • *
  • Online Online

  • Posts: 3864
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Boston, MA
  • Last Login: Today at 04:47:30 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1291 on: October 09, 2019, 09:42:17 AM »

Drivers on the Pike have begun to slow down on the weakest of grades.
It's the trucks that are the problem.  They take the center lane to pass someone and then they slow down on the upgrade.
I don't think so.  Plenty of passenger vehicles slow down of their own accord.

That's not just the Pike in Massachusetts. 495, on the tiny grades near the Chelmsford rest area or the borderline-unnoticeable hill near MA 133 in Tewksbury, traffic slows considerably and in rush hour grinds to a halt briefly. Wish people knew how to use cruise control...

Also the minor grade on I-95 (128) south of Washington Street in Woburn.
Logged
"And ninety-five is the route you were on.  It was not the speed limit sign."  - Jim Croce (from Speedball Tucker)

"My life has been a tapestry
Of years of roads and highway signs" (with apologies to Carole King and Tom Rush)

5foot14

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 39
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Middlesex County, MA, USA
  • Last Login: Today at 02:30:55 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1292 on: October 09, 2019, 12:40:23 PM »

So the sign replacement project on I-495 has been progressing and I noticed some oddities at the end of the Ward Hill Connector...

The first pic shows the new paddle sign going NORTH on 125 right at the split.

The second pic, going south right at the split...

See what they did there?
I'm assuming they will correct that at some point.

Also the third pic shows the paddle sign where the connector ends at 125. I find it extremely unusual they chose an airport sign panel over ya know referencing route 125 South?

SM-G900P

Logged

jp the roadgeek

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 3095
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Outside the I-291 beltway
  • Last Login: Today at 01:21:41 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1293 on: October 22, 2019, 09:06:48 PM »

Saw an odd thing when I looked at Apple Maps in the area of Clayton, MA and North Canaan, CT: there is a MA 73 shield on Clayton Rd and Canaan Rd through the town of New Marlborough.  The road passes from North Canaan into New Marlborough, then crosses back into North Canaan a couple miles later.  Is there any history behind this numbering, or is it an obvious error?
Logged
Interstates I've clinched: 97, 290 (MA), 291 (CT), 291 (MA), 293, 295 (DE-NJ-PA), 295 (RI-MA), 384, 391, 395 (CT-MA), 395 (MD), 495 (DE), 610 (LA), 684, 691, 695 (MD), 695 (NY), 795 (MD)

Alps

  • Everybody Obeys the Octagon
  • *
  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 12875
  • Elimitante the truck trarffic,

  • Age: 36
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Last Login: Today at 01:36:56 PM
    • Alps' Roads
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1294 on: October 22, 2019, 11:45:05 PM »

Saw an odd thing when I looked at Apple Maps in the area of Clayton, MA and North Canaan, CT: there is a MA 73 shield on Clayton Rd and Canaan Rd through the town of New Marlborough.  The road passes from North Canaan into New Marlborough, then crosses back into North Canaan a couple miles later.  Is there any history behind this numbering, or is it an obvious error?
Error

Pete from Boston

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 5282
  • Location: Massachusetts, and all the roads radiating out of it
  • Last Login: October 26, 2019, 12:02:51 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1295 on: October 22, 2019, 11:56:18 PM »

Salvucci backed the Big Dig largely because of the public transportation improvements that were promised as mitigation.  While work on the Green Line Extension, which has taken way too long to complete and has gone horribly over budget, is still under way, the MBTA has cancelled restoration of light rail to Arborway and has delayed the Red-Blue Line connector.

Heís been pretty clear that they had a holistic transportation vision in place, of which all these pieces were part. One thing he has emphasized time and time again is that the mitigation efforts were designed to mitigate in affected corridors, and that his successors abandoned that core principle by making substitutions like suburban parking lots rather than urban transit projects.

And from the horseís mouth, the last time I talked to him (as he kept his head down in the back of a Watertown church basement showing of a documentary on Hood Rubber, where his father worked), Mr. Salvucci reiterated that it was *his* childhood home obliterated by the Turnpike Extension.
Logged

Pete from Boston

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 5282
  • Location: Massachusetts, and all the roads radiating out of it
  • Last Login: October 26, 2019, 12:02:51 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1296 on: October 25, 2019, 03:49:43 PM »

Were there ever any fanciful plans to expand Route 16 west of I 93? The 1960 overpasses over Main St. (Mass. 38) and 93 are really overbuilt, even with evening backups, and the one over Main St has pavement actually closed off by guardrail.

Logged

Stephane Dumas

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1920
  • Last Login: Today at 03:41:40 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1297 on: October 26, 2019, 10:58:03 AM »

Were there ever any fanciful plans to expand Route 16 west of I 93? The 1960 overpasses over Main St. (Mass. 38) and 93 are really overbuilt, even with evening backups, and the one over Main St has pavement actually closed off by guardrail.



Could that freeway stub would had been part of the cancelled Inner beltway? http://www.bostonroads.com/roads/inner-belt/
Logged

Roadsguy

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 1568
  • Age: 20
  • Location: Here
  • Last Login: Today at 04:31:47 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1298 on: October 26, 2019, 11:04:02 AM »

Were there ever any fanciful plans to expand Route 16 west of I 93? The 1960 overpasses over Main St. (Mass. 38) and 93 are really overbuilt, even with evening backups, and the one over Main St has pavement actually closed off by guardrail.



Could that freeway stub would had been part of the cancelled Inner beltway? http://www.bostonroads.com/roads/inner-belt/

No, the Inner Beltway would have ended here where the ramps to Storrow Drive now tie in.
Logged
[thing you don't like] is better than [thing you like]

Pete from Boston

  • *
  • Offline Offline

  • Posts: 5282
  • Location: Massachusetts, and all the roads radiating out of it
  • Last Login: October 26, 2019, 12:02:51 PM
Re: Massachusetts
« Reply #1299 on: October 26, 2019, 12:03:44 PM »

Were there ever any fanciful plans to expand Route 16 west of I 93? The 1960 overpasses over Main St. (Mass. 38) and 93 are really overbuilt, even with evening backups, and the one over Main St has pavement actually closed off by guardrail.



Could that freeway stub would had been part of the cancelled Inner beltway? http://www.bostonroads.com/roads/inner-belt/

No, the Inner Beltway would have ended here where the ramps to Storrow Drive now tie in.

I know, thatís something else entirely.
Logged

 


Opinions expressed here on belong solely to the poster and do not represent or reflect the opinions or beliefs of AARoads, its creators and/or associates.