Nevada 374


Nevada 374 north (east)
Nevada 374 approaches the unincorporated town of Beatty, elevation 3,300 feet above sea level. The population of Beatty was 1,154 as of the 2000 Census. This view looks northwest toward Beatty Mountain (elevation 4,282 feet above sea level) and the Amargosa River, which winds through downtown Beatty and provides some water to an arid region. Photo taken 11/11/08.
Ahead on the right (C Avenue) is the Nye County Sheriff's Office and Justice Court. Watch your speed, as the remainder of Nevada 374 is all downhill on a 25-mile-per-hour limit into the center of town. Photo taken 11/11/08.
Known as the Gateway to Death Valley, Beatty has affordable lodging and restaurants for those visiting Death Valley National Park. many who visit Death Valley use Beatty as a base of operations due to its proximity to the valley and multitude of services, including some casinos. Photo taken 11/11/08.
Curving into town, Nevada 374 approaches Irving Street, which travels east to the Beatty Medical Clinic. After the Irving Street intersection on the right ahead is Beatty Museum and Historical Society, which can provide information on the local mining history and offer tourist information for the region. Settled by 1905, Beatty has its origins in mining like many towns in western Nevada. The nearby mining towns of Rhyolite and Bullfrog west of Beatty experienced the boom-and-bust cycle associated with gold mining. Only Beatty retains a population today due to its location on U.S. 95 and more recent increase in tourism (Gateway to Death Valley) and military activity (the nearby Nevada Test Site is a large military reservation that encompasses a significant portion of Nye County and includes the controversial Yucca Mountain project). Photo taken 11/11/08.
The next intersection along Nevada 374 (Main Street) northeast is with Fourth Street. The Stagecoach Hotel and Casino marquee is visible ahead on the left. Photo taken 11/11/08.
At the next intersection (Third Street), turn left to the Beatty Lions or right to the Beatty Town Park. Photo taken 11/11/08.
Northbound Nevada 374/Main Street approaches its junction with U.S. 95. Surprisingly for a rural Nevada state route, there are no approach signs other than this one for the U.S. 95 and Nevada 374 junction in downtown Beatty. Turn right to follow U.S. 95/Second Street southeast to Las Vegas, or proceed straight ahead for U.S. 95/Main Street north to Goldfield and Tonopah. Photo taken 11/11/08.
At this stop sign, Nevada 374 meets U.S. 95. No end shield is present here. Photo taken 11/11/08.

Nevada 374 south (west)
Nevada 374 begins in the unincorporated town of Beatty, elevation 3,300 feet above sea level. The population of Beatty was 1,154 as of the 2000 Census. Leaving the downtown Beatty intersection with U.S. 95, southbound Nevada 374 follows Main Street southwest toward Rhyolite. Initially, the state route passes through the town of Beatty as a four-lane highway, then eventually will narrow to two lanes and find itself on a rural highway toward Daylight Pass and Death Valley National Park. Photo taken 11/11/08.
Most motorist services (gas, food, lodging) are available in Beatty, as well as gambling and camping. The town is situated along the Amargosa River, which travels southwest into the Amargosa Desert and eventually northwest into Death Valley. Photo taken 11/11/08.
Settled by 1905, Beatty has its origins in mining like many towns in western Nevada. The nearby mining towns of Rhyolite and Bullfrog west of Beatty experienced the boom-and-bust cycle associated with gold mining. Only Beatty retains a population today due to its location on U.S. 95 and more recent increase in tourism (Gateway to Death Valley) and military activity (the nearby Nevada Test Site is a large military reservation that encompasses a significant portion of Nye County and includes the controversial Yucca Mountain project). After the turnoff to the town library and museum, southbound Nevada 374 narrows to two lanes (one in each direction) as it leaves town. Photo taken 11/11/08.
The first Nevada 374 south reassurance shield is posted at the top of the hill as we leave the town of Beatty. The local Mormon (LDS) church is located ahead on the right, and the Nye County Sheriff is on the left. Photo taken 11/11/08.
This mileage sign provides the distance to the Death Valley National Park boundary (eight miles). Unlike Nevada 267, the national park boundary is not located at the Nevada-California state line. The state line is a few more miles further west of the national park boundary; however, Nevada 374 ends as a state maintained highway at the entrance to Death Valley National Park. Photo taken 11/11/08.
A second mileage sign provides the distance to Stovepipe Wells (33 miles) and Lone Pine (114 miles) via Nevada 374, Daylight Pass Road (National Park Service road), and California 190. Photo taken 11/11/08.


Page Updated July 14, 2012.

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