Interstate 10 East - New Mexico - Sierra Blanca


Interstate 10 east
Welcome to Texas! For the next 881 miles, the Lone Star State will be your companion as you drive along IH 10. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
The first exit on IH 10 East serves Anthony. Anthony was incorporated in 1952 as a two-state city, catering to agricultural needs. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for Loop 375, the Trans-Mountain Highway. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
The Trans-Mountain Highway crosses the Franklin Mountains, which bisect El Paso. When constructed in 1967-70, it was TXDot's largest excavation project. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 9 serves Redd Road, which enters the suburbs of El Paso. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for Exit 11, Mesa St. Mesa St. is one of the old alignments of US 80 through El Paso. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Mesa Street, also Texas 20, is the old inland alignment of US 80, away from the Rio Grande. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.

Advance signage for Sunland Park Drive. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Sunland Park is a major interchange, serving the Sunland Park racetrack and Sunland Park mall, one of the two major shopping malls in El Paso. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Sunland Park also serves Paisano Drive, US 85 which rejoins another alignment of US 80 through El Paso (Doniphan drive north of this point). Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
After passing the idled Asarco Smelter, travelers find Exit 18A which serves the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and downtown. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 18B serves Porifiro Diaz Street and Franklin Avenue. We are winding into downtown El Paso at this point. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
This sign advises motorists to use the Downtown exit (Exit 19) to access Juarez, Mexico (via Stanton Street and US 62/85). Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
TX 20 (former US 80) crosses IH 10 at Exit 19, again as Mesa Street before turning into Texas Street downtown. Use Exit 19 for Downtown El Paso. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
The downtown section of IH 10 was completed in 1969, bridging the gap between the older sections east and west of downtown. Bridges through downtown are painted in Southwest colors, to add color to the sunken freeway. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.

Exit 20 serves Dallas and Cotton Streets. Cotton Street connects with TX 20 to the south. First photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle, second photo taken January 14, 2006.

Exit 21 serves Piedras Street. Advance signage for US 54/hidden IH 110, along with Chamizal National Memorial, can be found on this overhead sign assembly. First photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle, second photo taken January 14, 2006.
TxDOT replaced several overhead sign assemblies along IH 10 between 2005 and 2006. This new sign assembly features advance signage for US 54 and SH 478, Copia Street. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Copia Street (SH 478) is served by Exit 22A. Note the sign placement for Chamizal National Memorial - this is placed to tell motorists to exit US 54 for the Memorial, however the sign does not state which exit to take. Freeway junction signs are placed the same way in Houston for left or right exits. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for US 54, the Patriot Freeway and hidden IH 110. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
The Chamizal National Memorial commemorates the settling of a border dispute with Mexico. Before 1963, there was a disputed section of land just east of Downtown that was claimed by both Mexico and the U.S. due to a shift in the Rio Grande. After the dispute was settled, the land was turned into a national memorial. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
On the ramp from IH 10 East to US 54/IH 110. IH 110 travels south from this point as an unsigned interstate to the Bridge of the Americas. Traffic to the Chamizal National Memorial should use IH 110/US-54 south, signed here as "Mexico". Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Approaching the only stack in El Paso. The ramp to the right is the ramp from IH 10 East to US 54/IH 110. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for Raynolds Street is found under the four-level stack. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 23A serves Raynolds Street. The next exit is Paisano Drive, US 62/180. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 23B (with the missing overhead signs) serves Paisano Drive, US 62/180. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Exit 24A is Trowbridge Drive. The next exit is Geronimo Drive. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Heading to the eastern side of El Paso at Exit 24B for Geronimo Drive. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 25 is Airway Boulevard. Use Airway Boulevard to reach El Paso International Airport and US 62/180. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 26 serves Hawkins Boulevard. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Exit 27 serves Viscount Boulevard and Hunter Drive. The next exit is McRae Boulevard, FM 2316. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 28A, FM 2316 runs between IH 10 and US 62/180 to the north, serving the eastern suburbs of El Paso. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 28B serves Yarborough Drive. The next exit is Lomaland Drive. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 29, Lomaland Drive. The next exit is Lee Trevino Drive. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Lee Trevino Drive exits here, at Exit 30. The next exit is Zaragoza Drive. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Advance signage for TX 659, Zaragoza Drive. As IH 10 progresses further east, the city thins out and the freeway returns to rural Texas. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 32, Zaragoza Drive also serves George Dieter Drive. TX 659 runs between TX Loop 375 (the next exit) on both north and south ends. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
The next exit is Exit 34, Loop 375, also serving Americas Avenue and Joe Battle Boulevard. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Use Exit 34 to reach the Zaragosa International Bridge into Mexico. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Use Exit 34 to reach the El Paso Missions Trail loop. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Loop 375 was first designated in 1962, and has been extended numerous times into the present-day freeway. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Exit 34 also serves the El Paso Museum of History. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Loop 375 exits here, as Exit 34. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
The Loop 375 interchange is a cloverleaf interchange. The actual connections between both freeways are accessed via the frontage roads. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
The Loop 375 bridge is elaborately decorated. This bridge was rebuilt in 2004-2005 to add the elaborate decorations. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Advance signage for Exit 35, Eastlake Drive. Eastlake drive proceeds northeast to Horizon City. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 35 for Eastlake Drive. The next exit is for FM 1281, Horizon Drive. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
With most of the city behind, travelers find Exit 37, Horizon Drive (FM 1281) serving Horizon City. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
With El Paso completely behind us, the next control city becomes Van Horn. Only a short 548 miles to San Antonio! Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 42 serves the south end of the El Paso Mission Loop. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Advance signage for Exit 42, FM 1110 serving Clint. We are paralelling TX 20 at this point, which is old US 80. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Distance sign to Fabens and Sierra Blanca. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Advance signage for FM 793 at exit 49, serving Fabens. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Distance sign to the first rest area outside El Paso. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
FM 793 was designated in 1959 with the construction of IH 10, and simply serves Fabens. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
There is a rest area just past exit 49. This is the second rest area on IH 10 eastbound (the first is the welcome center). Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Exit 55 serves Tornillo. No towns exist along IH 10 due to the realignment away from old US 80/TX 20. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 55 departs from IH 10 here. Photo taken January 14, 2006.
Crossing into Hudspeth County, the speed limit increases due to the light population density. Photo taken July 31, 2006 by Kevin Trinkle.
Interstate 10 will have a daytime speed limit of 80 MPH for the next 400 miles. Photo taken July 31, 2006 by Kevin Trinkle.
However, trucks and vehicles hauling trailers are still limited to 70 MPH. Photo taken July 31, 2006 by Kevin Trinkle.
Active at-grade crossings are still found on IH 10 in West Texas. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for Exit 68, Acala Road. Acala Road heads west to Acala, also along old US 80/TX 20. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 68 for Acala Road. The next exit is for Fort Hancock. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for Spur 172, Fort Hancock Road. The ruins of Fort Hancock can be reached by this road. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for TX 20 and McNary. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Use Exit 78 to reach old US 80. McNary marks the southeastern terminus of TX 20, which started in El Paso. All of TX 20 is former US 80. At this point, IH 10/US-80 turns inland, away from the Rio Grande to enter the high plains of West Texas. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for FM 2217, Exit 81. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
FM 2217 paralells the Rio Grande to the small town of Esperanza. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Mileage sign for Sierra Blanca and San Antonio. Through West Texas, San Antonio remains the second control city. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for Exit 85, Esperanza Road. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 85, Esperanza Road. Esperanza Road also serves the small town of Esperanza. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Advance signage for Exit 87, FM 34. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
FM 34 leads south to the ruins of Fort Quitman. Between here and Sierra Blanca is the US Border Patrol inspection station. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Welcome to Sierra Blanca. Sierra Blanca, named after the nearby mountains, was the juncture point of the Texas & Pacific and Southern Pacific Railroad in 1881. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Old US 80 is Business Loop 10 (BL 10) through Sierra Blanca. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 105 is the western end of the Business Loop. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
FM 1111 runs through Sierra Blanca north to US 62/180 between Cornudas and Salt Flat. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.
Exit 107, FM 1111 and downtown Sierra Blanca. Sierra Blanca has an estimated population of 533 people. Photo taken February 27, 2005 by Kevin Trinkle.

Page Updated August 2, 2006.

© AARoads