U.S. 30

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U.S. 30 stretches 334.5 miles across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, from Greene Township, east of Chester, West Virginia, to the Benjamin Franklin Bridge (Interstate 676) across the Delaware River. The designation overlays the Lincoln Highway across Pennsylvania as part of its transcontinental route from New York to San Francisco. Through the Keystone State, many portions of the 1913 Lincoln Highway were bypassed by freeway or expressway alignments.

Spanning the width of the state, U.S. 30 angles southeast from the panhandle of West Virginia through Beaver County to Imperial in Allegheny County, where the route combines with U.S. 22 along a freeway (William Penn Highway) east towards Pittsburgh. The pair proceed east to Pennsylvania 60, where the 2010-extended Interstate 376 joins the route for the continuation to Carnegie and the Steel City.

Known as the Penn-Lincoln Parkway West, Interstate 376 and U.S. 22-30 travel an overcrowded freeway east to the Fort Pitt Tunnel and the Fort Pitt Bridge across the Monogahela River. This stretch of expressway was designated a part of Interstate 279 until June 10, 2009, when the first leg of I-376's extension west and north was made. East from the Fort Pitt Bridge end, U.S. 22 & 30 line Penn-Lincoln Parkway East, remaining along side I-376 along an older freeway that hugs the shoreline of the Monogahela River eastward to Schenley Park.

U.S. 30 leaves Penn-Lincoln Parkway East at Wilkinsburg, following Ardmore Boulevard and the Lincoln Highway southeast to Westmoreland County and Greensburg. Meeting the Pennsylvania Turnpike for the first time at Adamsburg, U.S. 30 commences a parallel course to the toll road that extends to Chester County in Southeast Pennsylvania. The route carries four lanes through much of Westmoreland County, but reduces to a two lane roadway east of Ligonier to Bedford, where another short stretch of freeway for U.S. 30 exists.

While running north of Interstate 76 between Greensburg and Bedford, U.S. 30 stays in close proximity to the toll road between Bedford and Sideling Hill, with a second freeway bypass carrying the route around Everett. Beyond the Turnpike split with I-70, U.S. 30 branches southward to Connellsburg, leaving Interstate 76 for an east-west stretch across Chambersburg, Gettysburg, Lancaster and Coatesville. This portion includes a freeway bypass of York and an older freeway from Stonybrook to Columbia and Lancaster.

U.S. 30 spans Codorus Creek just north of Interstate 83 and the borough of North York along this bridge carrying Arsenal Road. Photo taken June 21, 2012.

The freeway bypassing Lancaster dumps traffic from both U.S. 30 and Pennsylvania 283 east from Harrisburg onto an arterial stretching across eastern Lancaster County to Chester County. This leads motorists onto another freeway section that bypasses Coatesville, Thorndale and Downingtown. Until 1993, U.S. 30 left that freeway for a surface alignment through Exton, but that too was bypassed with a limited access highway.

Through travelers shift away from U.S. 30 onto U.S. 202, a freeway from West Chester to King of Prussia and the Schuylkill Expressway (Interstate 76) between Exton and Philadelphia. U.S. 30 remains on a surface alignment through Malvern, Paoli, Berwyn, Saint Davids, Bryn Mawr and Ardmore before entering the city. Lancaster Avenue carries U.S. 30 shields southeast to Girard Avenue, which leads the route east to I-76. The easternmost extent of U.S. 30 overlaps with Interstate 76 (Schuylkill Expressway) to I-676, and along the Vine Street Expressway and Ben Franklin Bridge to Camden, New Jersey.

U.S. 30 Reconstruction - Lancaster

A major project completely redesigned the U.S. 30 freeway in Lancaster County from Rohrerstown Road east to the Lincoln Highway East wye interchange between 1996 and November 2002. Costing $87.5 million, the largest project undertaken in south central Pennsylvania at the time widened the four lane freeway to six lanes from Pennsylvania 283 to U.S. 222 north of Lancaster, while adding auxiliary lanes elsewhere. Split into three sections, the 2.5-mile central portion was completed in December 2001, though two years after its original scheduled completion date. The western section was also fully opened to traffic in December 2001, six months ahead of schedule. The bulk of roadwork on the eastern section was completed on October 6, 2002, with sound wall and rumble strip installation continuing through November of that year.1

U.S. 30 Pennsylvania Highway Guides

U.S. 30 east - Breezewood
Departing the community of Breezewood on U.S. 30 en route to McConnellsburg. The Lincoln Highway reaches Crystal Springs and Pennsylvania 915 (Crystal Springs Road) in three miles. Photo taken 08/07/04.
U.S. 30 west - Breezewood
Entering the community of Breezewood on U.S. 30 (Lincoln Highway) westbound. The mountains of Sideling and Rays Hills open up to motels, gas stations, and fast food franchises as U.S. 30 nears the trumpet interchange with Interstate 70 & 76 (Pennsylvania Turnpike). An Interstate 70 Pennsylvania shield coincides the junction signage for the Turnpike. Notably absent is Interstate 76 from the fray. Photo taken 08/07/04.
The interchange between the Pennsylvania Turnpike connector and U.S. 30 is almost a complete trumpet with the exception of the missing directional ramp from the Lincoln Highway west onto the Turnpike access road south. Instead U.S. 30 motorists are directed to make a left turn to access Interstates 70 west and 76. Ahead Interstate 70 east joins U.S. 30 along the signalized stretch of the Lincoln Highway. Photo taken 08/07/04.
U.S. 30 scenes
Greenfield Road westbound at Hempstead Road in Lancaster, adjacent to the parclo interchange with U.S. 30. Before U.S. 30 was rebuilt through Lancaster, a folded diamond interchange joined Greenfield Road with the Lancaster Bypass. This entailed a loop ramp from Hempstead Road onto U.S. 30 west, which was eliminated for a new on-ramp directly from Greenfield Road Photo taken 09/18/04.
Four control cities adorn the guide sign for the U.S. 30 westbound on-ramp of Greenfield Road south. Westbound drivers quickly encounter Pennsylvania 23, U.S. 222, and the Pennsylvania 283 westbound split for Harrisburg. Photo taken 09/18/04.

Sources:

  1. "Work finished on Route 30 upgrade." Intelligencer Journal (Lancaster, PA), October 8, 2002.


Photo Credits:

    08/07/04 by AARoads. 09/18/04 by AARoads and Carter Buchanan.

Connect with:
Interstate 70
Interstate 83
Interstate 476
Interstate 676
U.S. 202
U.S. 222
Pennsylvania 10
Pennsylvania 283
Pennsylvania 896

Page Updated 06-07-2013.